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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Shelby NC
    Posts
    129

    Default Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    These folks had their gas logs hooked up to a grill tank. Any issues with that?

    NHIE Practice Exam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    I see it often.. As far as I know it is OK and no different than a gas grill. I'm not sure about that flexible appliance connector though. It is not designed for portable use and extended removal of the tank.

    We have several areas that do not have NG and folks use propane to run their fireplace gas logs. I think I would note that you did not check the gas logs to see if they were for NG or propane.

    Where's Bob Harper when you need him.......

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Shelby NC
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    I see it often.. As far as I know it is OK and no different than a gas grill. I'm not sure about that flexible appliance connector though. It is not designed for portable use and extended removal of the tank.

    We have several areas that do not have NG and folks use propane to run their fireplace gas logs. I think I would note that you did not check the gas logs to see if they were for NG or propane.

    Where's Bob Harper when you need him.......
    First for me but I see something different every inspection. Yesterday I saw a swan decoy in a crawl. believe me, the house was singing it's swan song. As far as this item I just marked it up as not anchored, subject to damage, CSST not bonded yada yada.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    Just to be first for a change, that's not CSST.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Shelby NC
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Robinson View Post
    Just to be first for a change, that's not CSST.
    If it's not Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing what is it?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    Not approved for several reasons. First of all, that is a "flexible appliance connector" listed to ANSI Z21.24--not CSST and therefore not approved where "piping" is required. Flex connectors can be used only within 6 ft of any appliance but limited to 3ft except ranges and dryers, which can be 6ft. It also cannot be used where subject to damage such as outside.

    That is a single stage low pressure regulator. Two stage regulation required for all indoor appliances.

    What is the BTU input of the gas logs?

    Un-sleeved non-galvanized steel nipple through wall.

    Bonded?

    I seriously doubt that 20lb cylinder even when full can meet the vaporization rate for the appliance. This would result in a delayed ignition, sooting, low flame, and carbon monoxide production.

    What are the clearances to sources of ignition, building openings, etc. per NFPA 58?

    Does that nipple penetrate straight into the firebox or enter the building, turn and eventually end up in fireplace? Length of run? Any other appliances?

    If serving only gas logs, a DOT cylinder piped directly through wall into fireplace can be done without a shutoff inside if: serves only one appliance, is "readily accessible" and properly labeled. The tank shutoff is not labeled.

    If in a flood plain, the tank would need to be secured.

    Anymore pics?

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Shelby NC
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Smallest propane supply ever. Is that OK

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    Not approved for several reasons. First of all, that is a "flexible appliance connector" listed to ANSI Z21.24--not CSST and therefore not approved where "piping" is required. Flex connectors can be used only within 6 ft of any appliance but limited to 3ft except ranges and dryers, which can be 6ft. It also cannot be used where subject to damage such as outside.

    That is a single stage low pressure regulator. Two stage regulation required for all indoor appliances.

    What is the BTU input of the gas logs?

    Un-sleeved non-galvanized steel nipple through wall.

    Bonded?

    I seriously doubt that 20lb cylinder even when full can meet the vaporization rate for the appliance. This would result in a delayed ignition, sooting, low flame, and carbon monoxide production.

    What are the clearances to sources of ignition, building openings, etc. per NFPA 58?

    Does that nipple penetrate straight into the firebox or enter the building, turn and eventually end up in fireplace? Length of run? Any other appliances?

    If serving only gas logs, a DOT cylinder piped directly through wall into fireplace can be done without a shutoff inside if: serves only one appliance, is "readily accessible" and properly labeled. The tank shutoff is not labeled.

    If in a flood plain, the tank would need to be secured.

    Anymore pics?
    Hey Bob, Thanks for the explanation. I have never seen it done like this so anyone's thoughts help. To answer a few questions, It does serve only one appliance, a set of gas logs. They were operating. The length of run from the tank to the logs was about 20' through a thin copper line once it got through the foundation and not including the amount of connector at the tank. It did enter the crawl and then turn Don't have any more pics of anything involving this setup. While I realize it is a appliance connector, why would it be improper to refer to it as CSST since it is made up of CSST and being used for supply like CSST and should be bonded like CSST? Cab you cite the ANSI for the two stage regulation. I want to review for future inspections.


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