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  1. #1
    Richard Roshak's Avatar
    Richard Roshak Guest

    Default Vinyl over brick

    Never saw this before, vinyl installed over brick. Can't see how this was allowed. My concern is how the vinyl is attached and what damage has occurred, also how are they sealing moisture out at the top (could not mount wet roof). Any input welcomed.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Presumably it would be installed over furring strips. Detailing (for example at windows and doors) would be a real bear, though.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Richard - Is it just the chimney you're concerned about? If so, I would be, too. Those guys need to breath!

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  4. #4
    Richard Roshak's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Yes, I already know the liner is badly deteriorated, I just would like to know the condition of the chimney above the roof line. I will likely recommend removal of the siding.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Roshak View Post
    Never saw this before, vinyl installed over brick. Any input welcomed.
    Richard,

    I would write it up as an improper install ( Flat against The Roof) let the installer explain
    how it is correct.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  6. #6
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    Question Re: Vinyl over brick

    What does the code say about clearances to combustibles? What is this was aluminum siding? Put your thinking caps on.
    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Richard,

    Sorry, misread your post - I though they had sided the entire house (I've seen it done over stucco).


  8. #8
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Just a question... did you see the brick in the attic?

    If you didn't mount the roof, how could you tell it was brick and not a framed chase?

    rr


  9. #9
    Richard Roshak's Avatar
    Richard Roshak Guest

    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Its a 55 year old home, all the homes on the block have brick chimneys and the chimney was visible in the garage.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Roshak View Post
    Its a 55 year old home, all the homes on the block have brick chimneys and the chimney was visible in the garage.
    I would simply note that the brick chimney has been unconventionally clad with vinyl siding and that I can not see the structure or its condition; then I would add that unconventional items tend to perform in unconventional way's. I would then recommend a Level ll inspection of the chimney by a qualified blah blah blah.

    If you can't see it don't guess, just report on what you can see.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  11. #11
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    Exclamation Re: Vinyl over brick

    Whether the vinyl siding itself at zero clearance to a chimney which requires a 1" clearance to combustibles or if there is combustiblke sheathing or furring beneath it, it should be removed. You can have heat conduction through the chimney, flame impingement through cracks or sparks or burning creosote causing a piloted ignition from above. I think you need to reinforce Scott's comments with a note about it being a fire hazard and not simply unconventional. You must warn them of what the hazard is. Does it simply not meet codes or is there something more practical to worry about?

    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  12. #12
    David Banks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    I believe this is what Bob is referring to.
    IRC: R1001.15 Any portion of a masonry chimney located in the interior of the building shall have a minimum air space clearance to combustibles of 2 inches. Chimneys located entirely outside the exterior walls of the building, including chimneys that pass through the soffit or cornice, shall have minimum air space clearance of 1 inch. The air space shall not be filled, except to provide fire blocking accordance with section R1001.16.
    Exceptions not included. No time to type whole section. Maybe Jerry has it.


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Vinyl over brick

    This is what Dave was posting and what Bob was referring to:

    (bold and underlining are mine)
    - R1003.18 Chimney clearances. Any portion of a masonry chimney located in the interior of the building or within the exterior wall of the building shall have a minimum air space clearance to combustibles of 2 inches (51 mm). Chimneys located entirely outside the exterior walls of the building, including chimneys that pass through the soffit or cornice, shall have a minimum air space clearance of 1 inch (25 mm). The air space shall not be filled, except to provide fire blocking in accordance with Section R1003.19.

    - - Exceptions:
    - - - 1. Masonry chimneys equipped with a chimney lining system listed and labeled for use in chimneys in contact with combustibles in accordance with UL 1777 and installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions are permitted to have combustible material in contact with their exterior surfaces.
    - - - 2. When masonry chimneys are constructed as part of masonry or concrete walls, combustible materials shall not be in contact with the masonry or concrete wall less than 12 inches (305 mm) from the inside surface of the nearest flue lining.
    - - - 3. Exposed combustible trim and the edges of sheathing materials, such as wood siding and flooring, shall be permitted to abut the masonry chimney side walls, in accordance with Figure R1003.18, provided such combustible trim or sheathing is a minimum of 12 inches (305 mm) from the inside surface of the nearest flue lining. Combustible material and trim shall not overlap the corners of the chimney by more than 1 inch (25 mm).

    When the chimney is outside the structure, as the one in that photo is, the combustible trim, siding, etc. may *abut* the chimney, however, it may only *overlap* not more than 1 inch of the masonry chimney, meaning that the masonry chimney is not allowed to be 'wrapped or enclosed' with combustible material.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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