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  1. #1
    RobertSmith's Avatar
    RobertSmith Guest

    Default Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Last edited by RobertSmith; 12-20-2007 at 08:54 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    Robert,

    I know for a fact that RH36 is not rated for exterior use so replacement is needed.

    As for the paint.....I doubt it is okay to do that but maybe Bob H or Dale F. will be surfing latter and can comment.
    Looking at the installation manual for the RH36 I can't find anything that says it can't be installed in an exterior porch like the one in the picture.
    http://content.hearthnhome.com/downl...s/4044_153.pdf

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    Looking at the installation manual for the RH36 I can't find anything that says it can't be installed in an exterior porch like the one in the picture.
    http://content.hearthnhome.com/downl...s/4044_153.pdf
    Scott. What about section 2 and 3?
    Location of the fireplace and chimney will effect performance as shown in Fig-2.1 The chimney should
    : Be installed through the warm air space enclosed by the building envelope......
    : Location of the fireplace in a basement, near frequently opened doors, central heat outlets or returns or other locations of considerable air movement can effect the performance and cause intermittent smoke spillage from the front of the fireplace.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Quote Originally Posted by David Banks View Post
    Scott. What about section 2 and 3?
    Location of the fireplace and chimney will effect performance as shown in Fig-2.1 The chimney should
    : Be installed through the warm air space enclosed by the building envelope......
    : Location of the fireplace in a basement, near frequently opened doors, central heat outlets or returns or other locations of considerable air movement can effect the performance and cause intermittent smoke spillage from the front of the fireplace.
    I don't know. That section has to due with the chimney structure and not the firebox. I'm going to guess that they make a stainless steel unit that will not rust outside and that is the reason that the RH36 is not for outdoor use. My question would be what it does not state "For Indoor Use Only" on the label.

    Truth be known, I have never even thought about looking at the FP units in the outdoor porches. I'm seeing a good deal of them now a days, so I guess I need to start. The battle is going to be that the label on the unit does not say it can or can't be used. Supporting document from the manufacturer would be very helpful.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertSmith View Post
    Here is the response I just got from Heat & GLO so Jeff, you be right!

    ************************************************** ********
    Mr. Smith,

    Thank you for your inquiry.

    The RH-36 cannot be installed in an outdoor application. This must be
    installed in the warm enclosure of the home. We do have a wood burning
    outdoor fireplace, the Montana-36. We do not recommend painting the
    refractory, it will flake and peel.

    Customer Service & Support
    Internal Code: cspw
    ************************************************** ********
    Good info. Builders here paint the refractory on every other new house I see. And, of course, it does peel off after the first or second fire. This quote will be put to good use.

    Thanks,

    Aaron


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Near Philly, Pa.
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    Talking Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Aside from the aesthetics, painting firebox refractory does change the heat signature of the fireplace. From that standpoint alone I would say no.

    From the aesthetic standpoint, any paint including high temp. (1,200F) rated will scorch. You will see a truncated cone behind the burner, grate. Due to the shades, it will standout even more than had they left it natural.

    Installing any fireplace outdoors presents a totally different challenge from indoor. With such variables in air currents, the heat signature can be radically different from indoors. Therefore, clearances are much more suspect. I've seen the flame leaning hard to one side for extended periods so the side wall of the enclosure gets too hot to touch. Oops!

    If you look at the printed propaganda on those outdoor fireplaces, you generally don't see them outdoors in a chase attached directly to the house. They are usually shown in a separate "appurtenant structure" such as an island around the BBQ. This is reminiscent of the old colonial cookhouse. If catches fire, you don't burn down the main house!

    HTH,
    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Heat&Glo Fireplace, Model# RH36

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    If you look at the printed propaganda on those outdoor fireplaces, you generally don't see them outdoors in a chase attached directly to the house. They are usually shown in a separate "appurtenant structure" such as an island around the BBQ. This is reminiscent of the old colonial cookhouse. If catches fire, you don't burn down the main house!
    Bob,

    Good point with "If catches fire, you don't burn down the main house!" ...

    The outdoor fireplaces I'd seen were a combination (so to speak) of the two types ... separate from the house at a rear porch, on a side or back corner, while 'separate from the house' regarding walls and chase, they were 'common to' the rear porch roof.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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