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  1. #1
    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Laundry room exhaust

    Can someone point me to a code which states the need for exhaust ventilation in laundry rooms, cant seem to locate it.

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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    To the best of my knowledge, it's not in the IRC, it is a hold over from other codes.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  3. #3
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    To the best of my knowledge, it's not in the IRC, it is a hold over from other codes.
    You mean other than the dryer vent, of course.


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    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Yes other than...
    Thanks JL


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    MM: They are not required in laundry rooms - not even in kitchens. Perhaps someday the anachronistic and illogical at the IRC will catch up with reality, but likely not in our lifetime.


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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    MarcM, California, right?:

    I am still unclear as to just what you are asking about "laundry room exhaust".

    1. You have defined the area as a Laundry ROOM which means more from Calif codes than just "Laundry" or Laundry Area. This implies that the ROOM contains nothing other than LAUNDRY i.e. no storage, utility room appliances, etc.

    2. Residence?

    Most importantly, since in follow up you have indicated you are not inquiring about dryer vent exhaust...

    3. Are you actually inquiring about VENTILLATION required for non-habital but occupiable spaces, specifically a laundry area?

    To address this we must first remember the distinctions between Habital areas and non-habital areas. Then we must address and remember the distinctions and requirements for OCCUPIABLE AREAS and the requirements for HUMAN OCCUPANCY of an AREA. Since you have defined the LAUNDRY area as a LAUNDRY ROOM Assume the area is enclosed or separated from other areas via walls, floor, ceiling and DOOR. You have not indicated if presumed door is indoor or outdoor, louvered or solid, etc. Inside or outside the CONDITIONED SPACE of the occupancy, and what side of the thermal/building envelope. (I.e. garage or unconditioned basement laundry ROOM). IF NO DOOR then shared space ventillation may apply, unknown if shared space is "habital" or non-habital.

    This gets us to the required natural ventillation and natural lighting requirements of the OCCUPIABLE area, and in lieu of same the requirements for mechanical ventillation and artifical lighting for the OCCUPIABLE AREA.

    4. If the Laundry area is below the first level (basement or partial sub-grade) or not is also of issue. If the laundry area is a part of a dwelling unit or a shared space brings other issues/considerations into play (ex. laundry connected to bathroom; in garage; off kitchen; etc.. Egress, natural ventillation and natural lighting can be served by the same. Unknown if operable window nor size either.

    Local ammendments may further restrict, provide, or require.

    Suggested resources (besides local office): 2007 California Building Code (Part 2 of Title 24) Chapter 12 "INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS", and the California Mechanical Code and California Energy Codes if applicable to the circumstances.

    You might start with Secs. 1201 GENERAL (esp. 1201.1 Scope), 1203 VENTILATION (esp. 1203.1 General, 1203.3 Ventilation and 1203.5 Other ventilation and exhaust systems), 1204 TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Esp. 1204.1 and exceptions) & 1205 LIGHTING. After reviewing the Definitions of HABITABLE SPACE & OCCUPIABLE SPACE; HABITAL STORY; and the Distinctions between the Definitions of CONDITIONED FLOOR AREA; CONDITIONED SPACE; CONDITIONED SPACE, DIRECTLY; and CONDITIONED SPACE, INDIRECTLY and the categorical breakdowns of RESIDENTIAL SPACE TYPE (or NONRESIDENTIAL FUNCTION AREA OR TYPE OF USE - which includes multi-family residential, if applicable to your questioned area) and BUILDING ENVELOPE.

    Subchapter 1 - All Occupancies - General Provisions

    Chapter 2 - Definitions

    Chapter 12 - Interior Environment


    California Mechanical code:

    Pages - CaliforniaMechanicalCode


    For your convenience and to get you started (bold, color & underlining mine for emphasis):

    Quote Originally Posted by CBC

    1203.1 General.
    Buildings shall be provided with natural ventilation in accordance with Section 1203.4, or mechanical ventilation in accordance with the California Mechanical Code.
    Exception: [OSHPD 1, 2, 3 & 4] For restrictions on natural ventilation, see California Mechanical Code.


    Sec. 1203.3. Ventilation. Habitable rooms within a dwelling unit shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area of not less than one twentieth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 5 square feet (0.46 square meters).

    In lieu of required exterior openings for natural ventilation, a mechanical ventilating system may be provided. Such system shall be capable of providing two air changes per hour in habitable rooms with a minimum of 15 cubic feet per minute (7 liters per second) of outside air per occupant during such time as the building is occupied.

    Bathrooms, water closet compartments, laundry rooms and similar rooms shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area not less than one twentieth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 1 1/2 square feet (0.14 square meters).

    In lieu of required exterior openings for natural ventilation in bathrooms containing a bathtub or shower or combination thereof, laundry rooms, and similar rooms, a mechanical ventilation system connected directly to the outside capable of providing five air changes per hour shall be provided. Such systems shall be directly connected to the outside, and the point of discharge shall be at least 3 feet (914 mm) from any opening which allows air entry into occupied portions of the building. Bathrooms which contain only a water closet or lavatory or combination thereof, and similar rooms may be ventilated with an approved mechanical recirculating fan or similar device designed to remove odors from the air.
    Hope that helps. Couldn't be more specific without the specifics of the so-called "Laundry ROOM", if said laundry ROOM is strictly and ONLY a Laundry (otherwise it is something else!) what you mean by "exhaust", where specifically located, etc.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    Can someone point me to a code which states the need for exhaust ventilation in laundry rooms, cant seem to locate it.
    Marc,

    Used to be required. Back in the mid '90s it was dropped.

    CREIA CCI & Evil Genius
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Ventilation is still required. Mechanical ventilation requirements depend on the quantity, sufficiency and availability of natural ventilation.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 12-02-2009 at 05:15 PM.

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    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Laundry room was a 10x10 room that is enclosed and includes a gas dryer. The room is within the residence, the house is a one story. The doors are solid w/no openings of any kind. There are three doors total. There is a vent for the dryer but i was more interrested in the rooms ability to ventilate, much like a bathroom. I see the verbage from CMC which is helpful.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    Laundry room was a 10x10 room that is enclosed and includes a gas dryer. The room is within the residence, the house is a one story. The doors are solid w/no openings of any kind. There are three doors total. There is a vent for the dryer but i was more interrested in the rooms ability to ventilate, much like a bathroom. I see the verbage from CMC which is helpful.
    Marc,

    The problem (as I see it) with mechanical ventilation in this particular case, is that turning on an exhaust fan would lower the air pressure in the laundry room. I wonder how this will affect the dryer's ability to exhaust if the doors are closed. Granted, the dryer has a fan, but makeup air is still necessary.

    CREIA CCI & Evil Genius
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    Laundry room was a 10x10 room that is enclosed and includes a gas dryer. The room is within the residence, the house is a one story. The doors are solid w/no openings of any kind. There are three doors total. There is a vent for the dryer but i was more interrested in the rooms ability to ventilate, much like a bathroom. I see the verbage from CMC which is helpful.
    Glad you found the links and citations helpful.


  12. #12
    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Yea HG AKA (snowbird)
    good stuff...I appreciate it. We used to have a lot of snowbirds when I lived in AZ.

    Oh yea, the best part of this room was they had a "return" in the center of the room. Classic.
    Gunner, perhaps this will make up for any Neg pressure.


  13. #13
    Dan Harris's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    Yea HG AKA (snowbird)
    good stuff...I appreciate it. We used to have a lot of snowbirds when I lived in AZ.

    Marc, the darn birds are still here, and arriving everyday in their RV's

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    An air-to-air exchanger would suffice.


  15. #15
    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Harris View Post
    Marc, the darn birds are still here, and arriving everyday in their RV's
    Ha HA... man, I remember when they came to town, the whole town would have crazy traffic for months. And I mean crazy traffic. It was always jammed plus they drive like crap. And forget about going shopping for anything.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Don't have to travel like a turtle or a snail. Multiple homes. Snowbird doesn't imply R.V.


  17. #17
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    Don't have to travel like a turtle or a snail. Multiple homes. Snowbird doesn't imply R.V.
    HG: A man with two houses is like a man with two wives: in double trouble.


  18. #18
    Marc M's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laundry room exhaust

    HG, didnt mean any disrespect. I'm sure you drive very well.


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