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  1. #1
    Terry Sandmeier's Avatar
    Terry Sandmeier Guest

    Default Moving Company???

    Hello All,

    Looking for a different direction to handle this. How do some of you handle this situation?

    Personal belongings in an occupied residence are preventing the inspection of items specifically, Electrical Panels.

    Example: A dish hutch fully loaded with dishes is blocking 1/3 of the electrical panel in the dinning room and the panel door cannot be opened to shut off a breaker let alone take the cover off to inspect the panel.

    Reported as not inspected and a safety hazard as there was not access to the panel.

    I'm relatively a young guy and could defiantly have moved the hutch, but the liability of moving the furniture (as each dish was displayed on a perch) exceeded the inspection itself.

    The listing agent I believe had some one move the item. I made a second trip to inspect the panel. I want to cut this cost.

    I know the first response is to charge a trip fee , but my client was reluctant to do so believing that this an important item of the inspection and should be included in the inspection fee, I agree.

    Trying to collect $$ from another source is chasing a rabbit down its hole.

    Efficient superior service is what I am looking for.

    Any thoughts?

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  2. #2
    MaMa Mount's Avatar
    MaMa Mount Guest

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    No way would I try and move a china cabinet.

    Charge them to go back. Tell the buyer to insist that the seller pay him back.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,365

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Sandmeier View Post
    Hello All,

    Looking for a different direction to handle this. How do some of you handle this situation?

    Personal belongings in an occupied residence are preventing the inspection of items specifically, Electrical Panels.

    Example: A dish hutch fully loaded with dishes is blocking 1/3 of the electrical panel in the dinning room and the panel door cannot be opened to shut off a breaker let alone take the cover off to inspect the panel.

    Reported as not inspected and a safety hazard as there was not access to the panel.

    I'm relatively a young guy and could defiantly have moved the hutch, but the liability of moving the furniture (as each dish was displayed on a perch) exceeded the inspection itself.

    The listing agent I believe had some one move the item. I made a second trip to inspect the panel. I want to cut this cost.

    I know the first response is to charge a trip fee , but my client was reluctant to do so believing that this an important item of the inspection and should be included in the inspection fee, I agree.

    Trying to collect $$ from another source is chasing a rabbit down its hole.

    Efficient superior service is what I am looking for.

    Any thoughts?
    I know where you're coming from and functionally it makes sense but realistically it's not a good idea.

    Once you offer to move things for a fee you're responsible to determine which things should be moved. Basically, look into the future and determine where the invisible problems are.

    I agree that some things, like an electric panel, are obviously in need of inspection. But, where do you draw the line? I can promise you it's in a different place than your buyer or his/her attorney would claim it should be drawn once a big problem (that was behind a piece of furniture) was found.

    I used to struggle with the same thing you elude to. You could put out a very small effort and save the sellers, buyers or whomever a very large effort. The saying 'No good deed goes unpunished' is never more meaningful than this instance.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Sandmeier View Post
    I know the first response is to charge a trip fee


    Because that is the only response.

    , but my client was reluctant to do so believing that this an important item of the inspection and should be included in the inspection fee, I agree.


    Do as stated below:

    Quote Originally Posted by MaMa Mount View Post
    No way would I try and move a china cabinet.

    Charge them to go back. Tell the buyer to insist that the seller pay him back.
    EXCEPT ... tell your client that it was BOTH AGENTS responsibility to make sure that it was accessible, that *unless BOTH AGENTS* are new agents, THEY SHOULD KNOW THAT, so do not accept an "I didn't know that was needed' for either agent, THEN ... tell your client that, to come back, you WILL have to charge a trip fee, and that they can get their money back from EITHER, or BOTH, AGENT.

    It is the seller's responsibility to provide access, but it is the agent's responsibility to advise the seller of that and to make sure they do.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    Terry, this will happen many times over the years if you stay in the business long enough. Your first must address this issue in your pre-inspection agreement. You should request that your client forward to his agent, the listing agent or to the seller (depending on the circumstances) your requirements to complete the inspection.

    The list should include items such as all utilities on and in use, pilot lights lit, access to electrical panels, crawl space, attic space, etc. As part of the list you can add the fee for a return trip based on whatever you want to base it on.

    I normally email this as part of my pre-inspection process. When people have been notified ahead of time, it makes your position much clearer. It is important that they receive the information ahead of time. The majority of the time the agents won't do anything, but at least you have notified them ahead of time.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  6. #6
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    This a something i like to send out to the agent and the buyer/selers along with the inspection contract.

    THE FOLLOWING IS A CHECK LIST FOR THE PREPARATION OF YOUR HOME FOR INSPECTION/WORK

    PROPERTY ADDRESS___________________________________________ _________________________
    DATE OF INSPECTION/WORK______________________________________________ ________________

    (1) LOCATE AND CLEAR ALL STORAGE ITEMS FROM THE SUB-AREA ACCESS
    TRAP DOOR.
    (2) LOCATE AND CLEAR ALL STORAGE ITEMS FROM THE ATTIC ACCESS.

    ( 3 ) REMOVE ALL STORAGE ITEMS FROM UNDER THE KITCHEN SINK AND.
    BATHROOM SINK AREAS.

    ( 4 ) CLEAR ALL STORAGE ITEM ADJACENT TO GARAGE WALLS.

    ( 5 ) CLEAR ALL STORAGE ITEMS ADJACENT TO EXTERIOR OF THE
    STRUCTURE.

    ( 6) SECURE YOUR CATS AND DOGS

    ( 7 ) AN INSPECTION MAY TAKE 2 OR 4 HR OF YOUR TIME.

    This will help big time...

    Best

    Ron


  7. #7
    Terry Sandmeier's Avatar
    Terry Sandmeier Guest

    Default Re: Moving Company???

    Thanks for the feed back.

    Being pro active is defiantly the best way to go.

    I found limiting the time dealing with issues after the inspection (reporting, follow up inspection, or consulting) is the best for all parties and is a better business practice.

    Sending an e-mail with the preparation I believe is going to be the most effective.

    Thanks again for the post,

    Best Regards, Terry


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