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  1. #1
    daniel nantell's Avatar
    daniel nantell Guest

    Default basement bedrooms without egrees

    When Inspecting a basement bedroom without egrees windows, It is a good idea to recommend installing egress windows for the safety of occupant, or would this just cause more problems than the seller or buyer wants to hear.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egrees

    If it is does not have egress, it is not a bedroom.

    Do you really base your inspection report on what people want to hear?

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egrees

    I think you might want to check it out further. I believe it has expanded further past just bedrooms in lower levels that do not have egress.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egress

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    If it is does not have egress, it is not a bedroom.

    Not true.

    If it is a bedroom it is a bedroom, egress or not.

    Report it as a 'Fry Room 1 - you are not getting out of there alive.'

    There are always three choices: 1) ignore it; 2) take money for it; 3) fix it/change it (i.e., in this case install EERO or make it not a bedroom)

    But to just call it a 'Bedroom without the required emergency escape and rescue opening' does not get their attention. Calling it 'Fry Room 1' does get their attention - and that is what you want - their attention, NOW address what their choices are.

    Yes, their choices include (getting back to what you asked) PROPERLY installing a PROPER emergency escape and rescue opening which includes a proper window well and a proper cover to keep people from falling in while not allowing anything to be set on top and keep one from getting out - I don't go for those flat grilles over the openings, someone could set a bunch of trash on that and you might as well not have a EERO. Angle it out and down from the wall so nothing can be set on it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egress

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    I think you might want to check it out further. I believe it has expanded further past just bedrooms in lower levels that do not have egress.
    You are correct. ALL basements must have at least one EERO, and a basement with sleeping rooms is required to have an EERO in each sleeping room.

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 04-20-2009 at 07:06 PM. Reason: Thank you Daniel, MUST HAVE
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    daniel nantell's Avatar
    daniel nantell Guest

    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egrees

    Jerry Did you mean must have instead must not have egrees exit. ?


  7. #7
    daniel nantell's Avatar
    daniel nantell Guest

    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egrees

    would two exit doors take the place of the window.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: basement bedrooms without egress

    Quote Originally Posted by daniel nantell View Post
    Jerry Did you mean must have instead must not have egress exit. ?
    Yep, thank you, went back and changed it.

    Quote Originally Posted by daniel nantell View Post
    would two exit doors take the place of the window.
    If not sleeping rooms and just habitable space, then the door from upstairs and a door up from the basement to the yard.

    If sleeping rooms, then each sleeping room needs its own 'second exit', i.e., an EERO, which could be a door. Say you have a daylight walkout basement and two bedrooms against that wall, each could have a door to the outdoors. However, a common door in a hall would not be acceptable, would have to be directly from the bedroom.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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