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  1. #1
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    From what i see after all my years of inspecting 95 % of the work on my reports never is address. All the little things in out reports are just stuff they don"t want to known. Minor crack in the kitchen cabinet, minor water stains on the window sill or minor moss on the roof. and so on...
    Not that this stuff is not worth addressing as it has a cost to it.

    But Have you ever put together a limited report program ?

    Something like only inspecting the Roof, Electrical, Plumbing, Foundation and overall construction of the home? And forget all the little crap.

    And offer a report like this for around $ 250.00 ?

    Best

    Ron

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Bibler View Post
    From what i see after all my years of inspecting 95 % of the work on my reports never is address. All the little things in out reports are just stuff they don"t want to known. Minor crack in the kitchen cabinet, minor water stains on the window sill or minor moss on the roof. and so on...
    Not that this stuff is not worth addressing as it has a cost to it.

    But Have you ever put together a limited report program ?

    Something like only inspecting the Roof, Electrical, Plumbing, Foundation and overall construction of the home? And forget all the little crap.

    And offer a report like this for around $ 250.00 ?

    Best

    Ron

    You will be doing the same work for less money.

    All you will not be doing is writing some of those things down, which some HIs do not write down anyway.

    But you would still need to walk, go, climb, crawl to all the same places.

    So ... why would do that for less money?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    I considered trying the same thing Ron but the more I thought about it, I realized how difficult it would be for me to just not look at something or ignore it altogether because it was not included in a lmited inspection. And like Jerry said, you'll probably end up doing the same amount of work anyway.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Bibler View Post
    From what i see after all my years of inspecting 95 % of the work on my reports never is address. All the little things in out reports are just stuff they don"t want to known. Minor crack in the kitchen cabinet, minor water stains on the window sill or minor moss on the roof. and so on...
    Not that this stuff is not worth addressing as it has a cost to it.

    But Have you ever put together a limited report program ?

    Something like only inspecting the Roof, Electrical, Plumbing, Foundation and overall construction of the home? And forget all the little crap.

    And offer a report like this for around $ 250.00 ?

    Best

    Ron
    Seems to me that most only care about the little crap anyway. I always ask my clients if there is something that they have seen or have concerns about. "Yeah, I saw a light bulb out" or " The carpeting is dirty, be sure and write that up for me."

    And this is the house they are looking at.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Fella called yesterday and asked how much I would discount the inspection if I did not inspect the receptacles or kitchen appliances. He wanted a detailed list of everything I was going to inspect and he would check off those things he wanted and not wanted inspected. Home inspection ala carte.

    Ok, if the crawlspace is wet but I am not looking at the landscaping because it is lovely, and the gutters and downspouts are obviously installed, and the plumber already said he did a perfect fix last time he was here, then how do I determine why the crawlspaced is wet? A house is more than just a collection of parts, it is a integrated system that works in concert.

    A limited inspection for a specific problem makes sense. The crawlspace is wet, figure out why. Then I am limiting my inspection to those areas that could effect the problem. The client is not limiting what I look at, the house is limiting what I need to look at.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    It's never made sense to me: I still have to block out the normal time for inspection, I've still got the same liability (or perhaps greater, due to potential misunderstandings of the scope of inspection) and as others have mentioned there's often not a practical line of demarcation between inspected and not inspected systems and areas. And when I'm asked to do a four-point inspection, lately it's usually on some absolute dog of foreclosure where I'm going going to have to spend more time on-site and reporting than I would at house in better condition.

    I've got a good example of this on my desk at the moment from a foreclosure I did earlier in the week: as part of the disclosure the bank released a list of violations from the city and a previous report by another inspector - a cut rate "foreclosure inspection for major defects". (Or so I hear, I don't see any statement of exclusions on the report).

    The reports a bad joke - the inspector missed (or at least did not report) that every rafter is bowing at last 2-3" (you can see the roof surface dishing from the street, I noticed it before I was out of the vehicle), that the "structural' brick wall supporting the rear of the house is collapsing (and I mean, it's literally collapsing, was obviously built by homeowner when then enclosed the rear porch and likely has no foundation or footing), that a trimmer on one side of the framing for the basement stairs had been entirely cut through to install and HVAC boot and the wall above it is sagging, and half a dozen other is equally in-your-face but not quite as serious problems.

    I also don't see any copyright notice on the report. And I'm REALLY tempted to remove the identifying information, scan his handwritten report, put it up on my website - my report on one side, his on the other - item by item - and direct price-shoppers there when they ask why I can't give them a discount, or why I'm $150 more expensive than this guy for the "same" inspection.

    Last edited by Michael Thomas; 06-11-2009 at 11:16 AM.
    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    There are two types of professions that really like limited inspections; Real Estate Agents and Attorneys for the plaintiff. As EC Jerry said the difference in TOT is small, but the legal exposure huge ! As some old inspector once said you can do thousands of inspections flawlessly, but folks will remember you for the large crack you missed in the foundation stem wall behind the wood piled against it.

    Long ago I gave up caring if any defect I reported was ever fixed or replaced. Home inspectors are purveyors of information of which much may be negative and if we don't impair an agent's sale (income) we will at the very least cost either the buyer or seller some money and thatís why we are so bloody popular. Those that are survivors in this industry who have any sort of successful track record provide well for their families and donít lose any sleep at night. Show me a successful inspector and Iíll show you a guy who has a safety deposit box at the local bank. When a client asked me if they could pay me in cash my standard reply went like this: ďAbsolutely, cash is always in good taste.Ē

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  8. #8
    Don Belmont's Avatar
    Don Belmont Guest

    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    First issue I see is clearly defining the scope in such a way that it would survive a first year law student . No doubt in my mind that if something left out turned serious the client would develop a memory loss as to what they wanted me to do at the time of the inspection.


  9. #9

    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Do a "verbal only" walk through. Wear gloves (no finger prints) Steal someone else's shoes and throw them away in the next county. Wear a disguise. Rent a car for the inspection. Get paid in cash only. No problem! "I was never there!"

    True Professionals, Inc. Property Consultant
    877-466-8504

  10. #10
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Quote Originally Posted by Dana Bostick View Post
    Do a "verbal only" walk through. Wear gloves (no finger prints) Steal someone else's shoes and throw them away in the next county. Wear a disguise. Rent a car for the inspection. Get paid in cash only. No problem! "I was never there!"
    Sounds like the OJ Simpson school of home inspection!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  11. #11
    Mike Richart's Avatar
    Mike Richart Guest

    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    They call them a four point inspection. Roof, A/C - Heat, Electric, and Plumbing. Some realitors require them.


  12. #12
    gary gramling's Avatar
    gary gramling Guest

    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    How do you handle it when the property is being sold by a bank, the utilities are off; and, neither the bank nor the Realtor will pay to have them turned on?
    Gary


  13. #13
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    Default Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Quote Originally Posted by gary gramling View Post
    How do you handle it when the property is being sold by a bank, the utilities are off; and, neither the bank nor the Realtor will pay to have them turned on?
    Gary
    I inspect it as it is. I document everything I see and note what I can't inspect due to the utilities being off. For example, I can't determine if the plumbing will drain if I have no water. Furnace won't operate without gas.........

    And I have told many clients that it is foolish to buy a home and not have the utilities on for inspection purposes. If the bank or seller will not turn them on then maybe they should shop for another home. There is too many of them on the market to play games over utilities.

    rick


  14. #14
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    Post Re: They don't plan on fixing any thing anyway

    Like Jerry and Nick, I decided a long time ago that it was nonsense to do limited inspections. The fee should actually be much higher for limited inspections, as the liability is increased. That may be the way to answer requests for limited inspections: double the fee.

    With foreclosed or vacant properties with the utilities off, there are two options from my perspective: 1) the utilities must be turned on and pilots lighted, or 2) all systems inoperable due to the utilities being off will be documented as non-functional. Any lawyer could argue "how could you say that?" to which the reply is "how could I not?" Where there is no evidence or proof that the system is functioning, it must be documented as non-functional. Generally, in my experience, offering an explanation to this effect results in the utilities being turned on.

    Why accept any liability for a poor choice by the bank or the real estate broker?




    Randall Aldering GHI BAOM MSM
    Housesmithe Inspection
    www.housesmithe.com

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