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  1. #66
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,517

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Aaron,

    Do you not do any summary pages on your report?

    I recently was considering it, only to have a list of all the defects together so the client could see them without having to go through each category on the original.

    I've seen a lot of inspectors doing that lately, but I've always listed mine in each category.

    Thanks,
    Rick

    Elite MGA Home Inspector E&O Insurance

  2. #67
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Rick,

    I started adding the summary pages about a year ago.

    I lift the items noted as "In Need of Repair" from the body of the report and put at the end of the report in a "summary" and I keep each item under its respective category.

    A duplication of items already noted, but I've had comments from many clients who have appreciated the summary as it has made their planning or even repair list easier to manage.

    Goes without saying it also helps them (with their agent) prepare a list as part of negotiation for offers/counter-offers, but in my discussions with clients I've not focused on that. That was not my original intent and I struggled with the change for a long time, but the client input was my main support for the change.

    Most programs allow for easy linking of such items to be put into a summary with a lot of additional effort in the report generation process.


  3. #68
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Aaron,

    Do you not do any summary pages on your report?

    I recently was considering it, only to have a list of all the defects together so the client could see them without having to go through each category on the original.

    I've seen a lot of inspectors doing that lately, but I've always listed mine in each category.

    Thanks,
    Rick
    Rick:

    In my opinion it is doing the client a disservice. If they do not read the entire text of the report, and they certainly will not if you provide a summary, then they will not get the gist of what you have to say. The whole summary idea, as I see it, besides being a nod to the A.D.D. culture we are living in, is to facilitate the agent's job by making what will definitely be used as a "repair request". This is a document that is not mentioned in our inspector SOP.

    Be careful if you do provide one to make sure that it has a disclaimer attached in STRONG language regarding the purpose of the summary. Replicate that warning in the main body of the report and in your pre-inspection agreement. I would even make that disclaimer a separate paragraph in the contract with a block for the client's initials.

    Otherwise, don't do it . . .

    Aaron


  4. #69
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,517

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Thanks Nolan and Aaron.

    The only reason I haven't used a summary page in the past is that I didn't want it to be strictly by the agent to do a repair request.

    I know the realtor would sit down with the client and first thing flip past the entire report and just read the summary.

    All of the other information such as disclaimers, comments about inaccessible areas and such would not be brought up.

    You and I both know, we have had clients call us after moving in and have problems with something. We panic and look up the report only to find out that we noted that problem on the report or we had a comment that we couldn't inspect that item for some reason.

    The point is no matter what you do, these folks do not throughly read the reports.

    You could have a statement in bold print that acceptance of the report allows the inspector to drop by after they have moved in and have lunch at his discretion and none of them would notice it. LOL


  5. #70
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Rick,

    That was and still is my struggle with the "summary". Aaron's input on notices/disclaimers are well taken, but as you both have noted ... agents flip to the back of the report and that is the end of that.

    At least without the summary you force the client/agent to at least thumb through the report to find the 'nuggets'.

    This may give me pause to not include the summary over the next few inspections and see what kind of 'noise' I hear.


  6. #71
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nolan Kienitz View Post
    Rick,

    That was and still is my struggle with the "summary". Aaron's input on notices/disclaimers are well taken, but as you both have noted ... agents flip to the back of the report and that is the end of that.

    At least without the summary you force the client/agent to at least thumb through the report to find the 'nuggets'.

    This may give me pause to not include the summary over the next few inspections and see what kind of 'noise' I hear.
    Nolan:

    Do take that pause. In addition to all that has been said, consider this. The agents and clients, though perhaps clamoring for a Reader's Digest Version for ease of viewing, are doing themselves a disservice. By not reading the entire text of the report it is often not possible to ascertain the severity of any given problem. Thus, all items listed in the summary appear to them to be severe. This makes for long "repair requests", pissed-off sellers, and fewer sales where sales likely should have happened.

    Also, in making a summary available you are, in essence (and in their minds), providing them with a prioritized repair list. This is now way over the line into the subjective land where you should not dare to go. The "noise" you may hear from the clients and agents is a mere whisper to what's in store for you if you get a client who is ethically challenged . . .

    It's just a subpoena away,

    Aaron


  7. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    York SC Licensed in NC and SC
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    In NC we are required to have a summary following the cover page.
    SC does not have any requirement either way but requires reporting the presence and even the non presence and condition of many things.

    If I can not inspect something for some reason, I actually list it in the summary as a recommendation to have it inspected. This way it may not be overlooked as easy by the client and will be present on the partial print outs agents make of just the summary.


    The NC report can not contain safety upgrades or other upgrades either. (If a safety item is present and faulty it can go in the summary)

    Starting Dec. 1 we have to put either the word "Repair:" or "Investigate:" in front of every single summary item. The summary has to be in the same order as the NC SOP and the report body also.


    Some items that used to just be mentioned, such as minor rot on the garage door jambs will now say Repair:
    Some items that would have been general will now have to be listed under the Structural heading where they appear much more serious than they may be.

    The whole reason for NC's rules is to accomodate the realtors requests who are on the Inspector Board. Now they have caused the reports to look even worse for the buyer with all the "Repair:" headings.

    Some may say that reporting the minor rot is not required. This just shows that they have never read some of the disciplinary actions posted on NC's website where the NC investigator has re-inspected a house and written up inspectors for lesser items than that.


    Here is part of the report concerning the Summary:
    (The first 3 sentences are required by NC to be present)

    This summary is not the entire report. The complete report may include additional information of concern to the client. It is recommended that the client read the complete report. The report is typically over 15 pages and the client should ensure they have the complete report and take the time to read it. This inspection has reduced your risk with purchasing the property but can not eliminate it.

    Its tough meeting the requirements, I inspect some 1500 sf houses that take 6-7 hours to inspect and report by the rules.


  8. #73
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Bruce:

    J-e-e-z! And I thought the Texas SOP sucked . . .

    Aaron


  9. #74
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    Nolan: ... Do take that pause. ... This makes for long "repair requests", pissed-off sellers, and fewer sales where sales likely should have happened. ... providing them with a prioritized repair list.
    Aaron,

    Points well received. Can't count the number of times both agent and client ask for "what would you consider major or important"? I won't go there in a heartbeat.

    Also ... so many times, as you noted, the "summary" has been sent to seller/seller's agent asking for everything to be repaired.

    Thanks again.


  10. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    York SC Licensed in NC and SC
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Why do my inspections seem to take so long?

    I think most of my summaries end up being presented to the seller in whole also. I think they work it out eventually on most homes.

    I have had to inspect multiple homes for the same client on several occasions and seen agents have breakdowns. I don't market to agents and am busy without them so I report and move on.

    One of the tricks agents have learned to use:
    (Don't let this happen to your client)

    Agent calls inspector and just rambles along about the report.
    Agent then calls client and says "I talked with the inspector and....."

    Some Clients call me and ask if I told the agent xxx was minor?
    I inform client that no, I did not verbally change the report.

    What happens to the clients that believe the agent?
    I include in my report that it is required to notify me if anyone presents a different opinion from the report.


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