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Thread: Re-Inspections

  1. #1
    Jeff Eastman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    When they ask you!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Tell your client that they should obtain copies of receipts from whoever performed the repairs along with any warranty information.

    If we have a client you really wants a re-inspection I will do it. I charge 50% of the original inspection to go back. I require a copy of the repair request furnished by my client to the seller. We inspect only the items on that list and we are only commenting that some type of repair has been performed.

    It not done correctly in my opinion, I simply state that so and the client should call the repair person prior to closing to correct any issues.

    We do not warrant any of the repairs and our contract states this about re-inspections.

    As long as your client knows that information, we have never had a complaint about it. Not one.


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    There are quite a few inspector who decline re-inspections because they don't want the liability. I don't understand the reasoning. It is still a visual inspection, just as was the initial inspection. If one were concerned about what could not be seen in the re-inspection then why would the first one be any different?

    I agree that having the receipts is golden - those alone can tell you a lot about the contractor's work. They're often vague, don't address what you had in your report and the re-inspection can often determine that the work indicated on the receipt was simply not done. In fact, when I do re-inspections, rarely was all the work done correctly.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  5. #5
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric stated: "In fact, when I do re-inspections, rarely was all the work done correctly."

    I would remove the word (from my experiences) "correctly". Hell, it is rare that all the work was done! More than 50% of the time the lists will include items that haven't been touched/ repaired but were on the repair list.

    I've been told... "Well, when the HVAC guy got there, he said the trap vent didn't need to be past the trap. So he didn't do anything"

    My reply-- "It no longer matters what he thinks... the contract ammendment (signed by the seller) stated that repairs will be made to that item".

    That's just one of the fights that goes on and on.

    Rich


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Jeff, I tell my clients that my E&O does not cover me on reinspects and it's the truth. Many policies will not extend coverage to you for reinspections. Makes my decision pretty easy.


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Here is a find today on a re-inspection. The seller was requested have the water supply lines on the water heater insulated and other water heater defects repaired by a Licensed Plumbing contractor with receipts to show work performed.

    This is what my client got as a repair.

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I used to tell them that, sure, I can charge you to come out and look at the repaired area, but I will not be able to tell you how they did whatever they did, or even if they did what they were supposed to do, all I would be doing is taking you money from you and giving you no good usable information for it ... but, if you insist, my re-inspection fee is $150 per hour, with a 3 hour minimum ... are you really sure you want me to waste your money?

    I had one taker on that, and about an hour later they called back and said 'I get it, you will not be able to tell me anything, and *I* will have to pay you $450 for that 'nothing'. Never mind coming out.'

    I would have already told them to get receipts from LICENSED CONTRACTORS and warranties on all repairs, make sure the warranties are transferable to the new owner, you.

    It would always end up the same - no receipts by licensed contractors and no warranties.

    It took a few years, but most of the inspectors in South Florida felt the same and we convinced our clients that it was better to just take the money and they can contract out for the repairs.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Russel Ray's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I think that if one is afraid to do re-inspections of work that has been done, then one should never inspect a brand new house that has never been lived in either. Same difference.

    And if the work was not done correctly, and in some cases not done at all, I sure want my Clients to know that information, and I'm probably the only one qualified or willing to tell them.


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    hey, those towels were in my drawer last week! what the F, damb gremlins


  11. #11
    Kevin Luce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Russel Ray View Post
    I think that if one is afraid to do re-inspections of work that has been done, then one should never inspect a brand new house that has never been lived in either. Same difference.

    And if the work was not done correctly, and in some cases not done at all, I sure want my Clients to know that information, and I'm probably the only one qualified or willing to tell them.
    Agree


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    It's amazing how fewer people want reinspections when they are charged appropriately for them. That's been the solution for me. I don't charge what Jerry did per hour, but I do calculate a half day's earnings and charge that because I can't be booked two places at one time.

    But never fall for the, "It will be paid at closing" or "the builder (or seller's agent) will pay you for the reinspection." If you elect to do reinspections, insist on payment before you give them the results. People tend to get upset when it doesn't go well the second time around.

    I subscribe to the get and retain receipts theory and try my best to get my clients to do so. My line is, "I'll take as much of your money as you're willing to give me, but I'll feel better if I can give you something valuable in return."

    The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    There are quite a few inspector who decline re-inspections because they don't want the liability. I don't understand the reasoning. It is still a visual inspection, just as was the initial inspection. If one were concerned about what could not be seen in the re-inspection then why would the first one be any different?

    I agree that having the receipts is golden - those alone can tell you a lot about the contractor's work. They're often vague, don't address what you had in your report and the re-inspection can often determine that the work indicated on the receipt was simply not done. In fact, when I do re-inspections, rarely was all the work done correctly.
    Eric and Russel,
    I'll answer your statements and questions with this example:

    Home inspector goes out and finds three leaks in a 10 year old shingle roof. The homeowner has the repairs done by a handyman working under a GCs license. The home inspector comes back and says all the repairs were done after viewing the invoice.

    First rain storm comes along and the new homeowner has several roof leaks. The contractor did not give any warranty.

    A licensed roofer comes out and says that all of the repairs were done improperly which explains the leaks and now, in order to do the proper repairs, the roofer says that the entire roof will have to be replaced at a cost of $15,000.00.

    I would imagine that when this gets to court, the home inspector will have to pay.

    For minor items, leaky drains and such, I tell my clients that they don't need me to come hold their hands at $350.00 per hour to see if a drain line is leaking or if a GFI trips.

    Major items such as roofs, a/c systems, and structural items are to be repaired by licensed contractors with warranties. NO exceptions. Also, I tell my clients that you want to see proposals and warranties before you buy the home. The other option is like Jerry said, take the money and hire your own contractors.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  14. #14
    Michael Greenwalt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Don't do re-inspections period. Insurance doesn't cover me, my attorney tells me its a door you cant come back from liability wise, and it is never a good idea. I prefer to refer to those I pay to protect me and to do otherwise is foolish. Theorize all you want but if no one can protect my back I don't choose to jeopardize my business and my family over a small fee.


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    My opinion here.

    If an inspector is not willing to do a re-inspection he certainly cannot say he is full service. In essence, I think that an inspector who will not assist with a re-inspection is leaving his client high and dry. Too often on this forum there are negative comments about all the lousy contractors yet there seems to be little concern for leaving the client to fend for themselves after the initial inspection.

    In looking through some websites I see inspectors making some significant claims as to their abilities. What I seem to be hearing here is that some inspectors would not know how to tell if a repair was done correctly. If that is the case then there would be question as to whether that inspector could have recognized problems on the initial inspection.

    I have absolutely no hesitation or reservation about conducting re-inspections. I see no increased liability issue. My clients know that if any contractor disputes my findings that I will step to the plate and backup my reports. I do not charge to go back out and meet such contractors - it's a service that I promote.

    Sorry for the bluntness, but those of you who are "afraid" of re-inspections, of any liability, of being wrong - you and I are in different leagues and I cannot identify with your reasonings. Perhaps some websites should be changed to reflect that followup re-inspection support is not provided. Let the client know up front what he can expect after he pays you for your service. It's the fair and professional thing to do.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    If an inspector is not willing to do a re-inspection he certainly cannot say he is full service.
    -
    Sorry for the bluntness, but those of you who are "afraid" of re-inspections, of any liability, of being wrong - you and I are in different leagues and I cannot identify with your reasonings. Perhaps some websites should be changed to reflect that followup re-inspection support is not provided. Let the client know up front what he can expect after he pays you for your service. It's the fair and professional thing to do.
    "you and I are in different leagues"

    I suppose we were, mine was top end service and I gave my clients what they wanted, expected, and the I gave them more.

    "and I cannot identify with your reasonings"

    Obviously. But that does not make you right either.

    Unlike some inspectors clients (apparently, anyway) my clients were not dumb, they understood why they hired me, and why them paid me top dollar.

    My clients fully understood why I would not, could not, give them the 'A OK' for repairs which were done when I was not there and which were no longer visible and accessible enough to say 'Yep, that'un was done alrighty.'

    My clients were smarter than than, and they hired me because I was smarter than that.

    I felt there was no need to respond to Russel, but there was a need to respond to the above post.

    Like you, sorry if I'm blunt - but it is needed at times.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    My opinion here.

    If an inspector is not willing to do a re-inspection he certainly cannot say he is full service. In essence, I think that an inspector who will not assist with a re-inspection is leaving his client high and dry. Too often on this forum there are negative comments about all the lousy contractors yet there seems to be little concern for leaving the client to fend for themselves after the initial inspection.

    In looking through some websites I see inspectors making some significant claims as to their abilities. What I seem to be hearing here is that some inspectors would not know how to tell if a repair was done correctly. If that is the case then there would be question as to whether that inspector could have recognized problems on the initial inspection.

    I have absolutely no hesitation or reservation about conducting re-inspections. I see no increased liability issue. My clients know that if any contractor disputes my findings that I will step to the plate and backup my reports. I do not charge to go back out and meet such contractors - it's a service that I promote.

    Sorry for the bluntness, but those of you who are "afraid" of re-inspections, of any liability, of being wrong - you and I are in different leagues and I cannot identify with your reasonings. Perhaps some websites should be changed to reflect that followup re-inspection support is not provided. Let the client know up front what he can expect after he pays you for your service. It's the fair and professional thing to do.
    It is not that some of us, especially here in South Florida, are "afraid" of re-inspections, it is that we realize that we are not inspecting, we are guaranteeing someone elses work.

    Would you guarantee your dentists or doctors work?

    Although I don't charge as much as Jerry did, my clients are also smart enough to know what they are paying me for. If they want me to hold their hands, I will... but it will come with a steep price.

    What I seem to be hearing here is that some inspectors would not know how to tell if a repair was done correctly. If that is the case then there would be question as to whether that inspector could have recognized problems on the initial inspection.
    I gave an example above. It is not fiction. It has happened and the company put a roof on for free. It was the first thing I did when I started working for that company back in 1988. I didn't do the inspection, one of their highly trained inspectors did.

    You tell me exactly how you can "visually" tell a roof has been repaired properly with out being there to see the work being done. To use your phrase, I'll be blunt, you can't.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Van De Ven View Post

    A licensed roofer comes out and says that all of the repairs were done improperly which explains the leaks and now, in order to do the proper repairs, the roofer says that the entire roof will have to be replaced at a cost of $15,000.00.

    I guess I would ask myself why I didn't recognize the problems (that the roofer noticed) when I went and re-inspected the roof. If the problem was not visible at the time of the re-inspection, then that goes beyond the scope of an inspection which would be the same standards used during the first inspection.

    A buyer calls me to do a home inspection. I get there and the seller shows me a receipt showing that part of the roof has been repaired two days ago, do I (as a home inspector) inform my client (the buyer) that I will not be inspecting that repaired part of the roof?

    Limitation: I (the home inspector) did not inspect recently repaired part of roof due to ???.

    For me to understand, I really need somebody to fill in where the question marks are.


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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric, Now this is beginning to fall into place. Where did the guaranteeing part come from? I have never considered a re-inspection as a guarantee of someone else's work. An initial inspection is not a guarantee. No matter what the circumstances, my (our) inspections are visual and I fully agree with you, you can't comment on what you can't see. That's spelled out in my contract just as it probably is in most other inspection contracts as well as any SOP that I have ever seen. If I go out to look at a roof repair and all looks well I will tell the client it looks good. But I make sure that the client understands that looking good can still leak.

    I think that if the client understands the reality and limitations of home inspections they can accept them for what they are which is far more than not using us at all. Perhaps if re-inspections are such a concern to some inspectors then perhaps the scope and breadth of our work has not been clearly laid out on the table. Getting client expectations in line is vital.

    I have had some re-inspection requests in which there would have been no way for me to know if the repair corrected the problem such as leakage from a condensing furnace. For those I decline the re-inspection and say why and stress the importance of a detailed receipt as well as warranty info from the contractor.

    Thanks for the reply, it explains why we were on such different pages.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    Where did the guaranteeing part come from? I have never considered a re-inspection as a guarantee of someone else's work.
    Exactly.

    *WE* never considered re-inspections to be a guarantee either.

    BUT ...

    The clients did/do/have.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Luce View Post
    I guess I would ask myself why I didn't recognize the problems (that the roofer noticed) when I went and re-inspected the roof. If the problem was not visible at the time of the re-inspection, then that goes beyond the scope of an inspection which would be the same standards used during the first inspection.

    A buyer calls me to do a home inspection. I get there and the seller shows me a receipt showing that part of the roof has been repaired two days ago, do I (as a home inspector) inform my client (the buyer) that I will not be inspecting that repaired part of the roof?

    Limitation: I (the home inspector) did not inspect recently repaired part of roof due to ???.

    For me to understand, I really need somebody to fill in where the question marks are.
    Kevin,

    You listed two totally separate and distinct scenarios as though they are the same.

    Here is why they are not the same.

    1) You go to inspect a roof and point out what you see and what was done wrong (those repairs) regarding the part you can still see.

    You report the roof needs so-and-so work done.

    2) You now go and re-inspect the repairs made to so-and-so work.

    In 1) above, you knew nothing about 'what was there before the repair', you are only commenting on what is visible.

    In 2) above, you know about 'what was there before the repair', AND, you are there to say it was done, done correctly, not done, or not done correctly.

    Saying 'it was done' as the same as saying 'it was done correctly'.

    Saying 'it was not done' is the easy one - it either was done, or was not (no work done at all).

    Saying 'it was not done correctly' is possible but not necessarily correct in your assessment as, the part which may no longer be visible may actually 'be correct', just the part you can see is 'not correct'. To say the repair is 'not correct' leaves you open to being wrong if another roofer opens the repair up and finds the underlying preparation work correct, just the finishing off of the repair was incorrect. To iffy to address this aspect.

    Saying (this is the riskiest part as you really have no idea if what was done was actually *what YOU reported it needed*) 'it was done correctly' when you really have no idea *HOW* *IT WAS DONE* below the top surface you can see. Yet, you were handed a receipt, by a licensed roofing contractor, and you are being paid (or doing it at no charge - your choice) to come down and tell everyone 'This is what I wrote up and this is what the licensed contractor did, *AND IT IS OKAY*.' Yet you have *no idea* of what was done below that top layer of the repair.

    Yet, the next inspector in (or the next roofer in) may say 'That's all wrong.' Why? Because they *SUSPECT* (don't know until the repair is ripped open) that the repair is wrong, because 'those repairs are always done wrong'. The next inspector cannot see anything you cannot see, but you have pre-existing knowledge of that area which they do not, so you judge it differently. The next roofer coming in sees the same thing the next inspector does, a repair with no previous knowledge of what it was like, and, like the next inspector, he knows his guys always do this wrong, and he knows other roofers always do this wrong, so he takes the safe bet and says 'It's done wrong.' Oh, yeah, he will also have the advantage that, if when he opens the repair up and finds it is actually right, to repair it back right, and then come down off the roof and say 'Yep, just as I suspected, they had done it wrong.'

    Would anyone know, or even suspect, anything different? Nope.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I guess I would ask myself why I didn't recognize the problems (that the roofer noticed) when I went and re-inspected the roof. If the problem was not visible at the time of the re-inspection, then that goes beyond the scope of an inspection which would be the same standards used during the first inspection.
    Here is why: The hardest thing to do is to go in after someone else has been there and fix what they did wrong. In the example I gave, the roof was ten years old and had two valley leaks and a field leak. The handyman "repaired" the valleys and "repaired" the field leak.

    After the homeowner moved in, everything started leaking. When they called a roofer, the roofer started to take the roof apart and there was no metal in the valley where the repair was made. He told the homeowners that he wasn't going to do the repair unless he replaced the valley and the other valley as well. The other re[paired valley connected to another valley and that was now leaking due to the repair of the other valley.

    At this point, the roofer wanted nothing to do with the roof and said the only way he would do anything was if he replaced the roof because he suspected that several other things were wrong.


    Where did the guaranteeing part come from? I have never considered a re-inspection as a guarantee of someone else's work.
    Perhaps you should contact an attorney and ask him about that. His answer may make you re-think your views on this.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I would like to add this to the discussion.
    My insurance company (and several others) does not cover me for: progress construction inspections, OR follow up re-inspections.

    They DO cover me for FULL inspections of homes, new or old.

    THAT alone is enough for me to NOT do re-inspections.

    That said, I have done re-inspections ever since I started business (about 18 years now). However, when I found out I wasn't covered (my bad for not reading the entire policy before), I have moved away from doing them.

    I am faced with the dilemma of trying to give my clients the best possible service, and trying to protect myself from lawsuits.

    There have been many times during re-inspections (and during regular inspections) that it just isn't possible to see everything you need to see to determine if it is A-OK. It is never a comfortable situation, however in a re-inspection mode, I think you are at a higher risk than during the initial inspection, since they want to "know" it has been taken care of properly.

    JF

    Last edited by Jack Feldmann; 04-22-2007 at 01:45 PM. Reason: Changed spelling from along to alone

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric,

    If an attorney thinks that a re-inspection is a guarantee then he's pulling that out of thin air. I'd really like to know where that expectation comes from. It's not from our profession. No doubt that attorneys can create pause for consideration but they also are no reason to scurry under the bushes either. Between a SOP, an inspection contract and communicating with clients expectations can be kept in line - this is vital.

    As for insurance coverage not covering re-inspections - I don't have that restriction in my policy.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Jerry, I had to read your last post a couple of time to make sure I understood the point you were making. I feel I know what you are saying, but it sounds like a lawyer trying to win a case on a technicality.

    I personally don't see the difference between inspecting a "just repair roof" during the first inspection or going back and inspecting a "just repair roof" during a re-inspection. In both causes, the clients are relying on you to inform them if any visual problems or potential problems. Reporting the limitation is always done in a report.

    I really enjoy reading everyones post here. It makes me re-think what type of service I provide and the possible consequences. At this time, I will continue offering this service until I decide not to or my insurance changes.

    Thank you!

    Last edited by Kevin Luce; 04-22-2007 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Messed up on spelling Jerry name.

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    If an attorney thinks that a re-inspection is a guarantee then he's pulling that out of thin air. I'd really like to know where that expectation comes from. It's not from our profession.
    Eric B.,

    The point is, it does not matter who or where the attorneys get their ideas from. Once gotten, it is easy to find judges, juries, and precedent to substantiate the supposition that, if, as a professional paid inspector, the inspector 'should have been able to' determine that the repair was not made in accordance with what that same inspector previously reported as needing to be done.

    From that point on, the professional inspector will be held to a higher standard for repairs made to items in their reports than they will be held to for 'unknown conditions' which are lurking beneath the surface. In the first case, you were there, your professional opinion was that it was wrong and needed repair (and that's what you reported), and now you are being asked to bless the repair based on the color of the paint applied over the surface (exaggerating the point that you are only reporting on only what you can now see), and you do so ... versus ... having no previous knowledge of a specific roof and reporting on 'what is not right' about it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Luce View Post
    Jerry, I had to read your last post a couple of time to make sure I understood the point you were making. I feel I know what you are saying, but it sounds like a lawyer trying to win a case on a technicality.
    My post was meant to make one think about the entire concept in broader terms, and you did.

    You don't think you would lose on a technicality?

    By the way, 'on a technicality' simply means 'based on facts in evidence and the wording of the law and the charge against a person'. If you stab someone with a knife and you are charged with shooting them, you will get off.

    "It's just a technicality" that you stabbed them instead of shooting them, they are still dead.

    It happens all the time.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  28. #28
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric B.

    I agree with your philosophies - especially regarding service to the client. It's all about setting the "table of expectations" with each and every client (regardless of how smart I think they are). If this vital step is overlooked, or abbreviated, regardless of the kind of inspection (whole-house or re-), you better hold on to your hat! In my opinion, pre-inspection protocol is the SINGLE most important thing you can do to manage your risks (outside of a quality inspection).

    Now, if an inspector's E&O does not cover them for re-inspections, then by all means act accordingly.

    The whole "last man in" argument has always baffled me. What if a client buys a house you inspected and decided not to ask for any repairs - that you recommended? Guess what? You're the last man in! This happens all the time and is essentially no different than the position you're in after a re-inspection.

    I guess what I'd like to know is why do the E&O insurance companies not cover re-inspections? Can anyone answer this?


  29. #29
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    The whole "last man in" argument has always baffled me. What if a client buys a house you inspected and decided not to ask for any repairs - that you recommended? Guess what? You're the last man in! This happens all the time and is essentially no different than the position you're in after a re-inspection.
    I'll try to make this as simple as possible:

    If no repairs were done, too bad for your client. You found the things wrong you were supposed to.

    After the repairs were done, you inspected "the repairs", someone else's work. Not your work. The initial inspection was "your work".

    In my early days, when I did re inspections, I said that a drain line was no longer leaking. It had been repaired and was no longer leaking. It looked OK.
    Three weeks later, I was at the same house fixing this drain line the right way. It was the last re inspection I ever did for a fee.

    I wonder where Jeff Hooper is. I am pretty sure he has dealt with this in a courtroom.

    For anything further on this, see Jerrys post above. Someday, when it happens to you, you will remember this thread.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  30. #30
    Shane Pouch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric V.

    I don't think it is as big a deal as you make it out to be, no more so than the original inspection.

    But, we can agree to disagree.


  31. #31
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Pouch View Post
    Eric V.

    I don't think it is as big a deal as you make it out to be, no more so than the original inspection.

    But, we can agree to disagree.
    I have given two examples in my posts above. That is why I will not "agree to disagree". I have facts that it can, will, and did happen.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric B.,

    I'm sure you have checked with your insurance company - but I "thought" I was covered until I started checking. I followed this topic up with several insurance companies at the ASHI conference in CA in January and found the ones I talked to had similar policies (no pun intended). I didn't talk to every insurance company there, though.

    Obviously, yours may be different.
    JF


  33. #33
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Pouch View Post
    Eric V.

    I don't think it is as big a deal as you make it out to be, no more so than the original inspection.

    But, we can agree to disagree.
    Eric V.,

    When someone says 'we can agree to disagree', like Russel frequently said, that means their mind is made up and has been closed to further thought and opposing views.

    We can take a horse to water, but some will drown themselves just so they do not have to take a drink.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    or....... my favorite.......
    Some will read about it.......
    some will listen ............
    Some actually have to urinate on that electric fence to see if it is live......


  35. #35
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Eric V.,

    When someone says 'we can agree to disagree', like Russel frequently said, that means their mind is made up and has been closed to further thought and opposing views.

    We can take a horse to water, but some will drown themselves just so they do not have to take a drink.
    I always viewed those statements as a "cop out" because there isn't any factual argument for the other side.

    Since this topic has most likely exhausted itself,

    Enjoy:

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  36. #36
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I always viewed those statements as a "cop out" because there isn't any factual argument for the other side.


    There has been plenty of factual argument for "the other side", you just haven't been listening. You operate as you do, because you have "facts", and that makes you right. Therefore, you don't see any merit in remarks made by “the other side”. You view “the other side” as wrong, and making bad judgments in how they choose to conduct business.

    If there is a "cop out", it is not serving the client when they request it - just because one has experienced adverse conditions in the past, or thinks he might in the future.

    Like I said before, it's all about setting the table of expectations.

    When someone says 'we can agree to disagree', like Russel frequently said, that means their mind is made up and has been closed to further thought and opposing views.
    Wow! Simply stating an opinion on something and being committed to it now means that I’m close-minded. No, it means that I’m stating my opinion. I know it's going to be hard for you to believe, but there really are folks out there who want to hear testimonials from opposing ways of thinking to help them form their own way of doing things.

    For you to tell me I'm close-minded is the funniest thing I've heard all weekend! What makes you, or Eric V., any less close-minded than me, or Eric B.? Who is the judge of that? You? Don't tell me I'm being close-minded - what a joke.


  37. #37
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    "If there is a "cop out", it is not serving the client when they request it "

    I once had a potential client that asked if I would be able to check if there had ever been pets in the house. I said that since the house was 25 or so years old, I would have NO IDEA if there had been. She then asked if I couldn't go around and smell the carpet. No I couldn't and she should find another inspector that might be willing to do that for her, or was psychic and could tell if the carpet was ever replaced in 25 years too. There was more to the conversation, but you get the point.

    There are many times that the clients "expectations" are far greater than we are able to deliver, even IF we are more than willing to provide a great service. Sometimes we just can not do something a client wants, or "expects" us to do.

    There might be that client that "requests" that you climb that 12/12 slate roof during a freezing rain storm. Is it a cop out to tell them NO?

    I'm sure Mr. Super Inspector would fly his personal helicopter to check out the roof for those clients, and with his x-ray goggles be able to tell them how many and what kind of fasteners were used too. But I think that most of us would have to say "sorry, no I can't".
    JF

    Last edited by Jack Feldmann; 04-22-2007 at 08:44 PM. Reason: correction edit

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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    "If there is a "cop out", it is not serving the client when they request it - just because one has experienced adverse conditions in the past, or thinks he might in the future."

    This is called operating your business as you see fit. One could also say your current and future business decisions are based on past mistakes or decisions that didn't work out as planned. For example, I used to perform pre-drywall inspections but no longer. Why? After having three separate pre-drywalls inspections canceled within a couple hours of the scheduled time due to resistance from the builder in allowing the client to have the inspection, I said enough. I would no longer clog a slot on my schedule for a job that only earned me 1/3 of the fee of a full inspection. If you'd like me to come perform a full pre-settlement inspection when the house is in a finished state, I'd be happy to assist you.

    Just because somebody asks for something doesn't mean they are going to get it. There are far too many scenarios to list but just to name a few..........

    "I understand there is standing water on the floor in front of the service panel but you are going to check the inside aren't you? I need to know if something is wrong for my negotiations."

    "I'd like you to move the entertainment center to check that outlet or HVAC register."

    "I'm going to postdate this check for a week from today when I get paid. But I'll still receive my report tomorrow, correct?"

    Whoever came up with the phrase "the customer is always right" didn't know what they were talking about.


  39. #39
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Ostrowski View Post
    I would no longer clog a slot on my schedule for a job that only earned me 1/3 of the fee of a full inspection. If you'd like me to come perform a full pre-settlement inspection when the house is in a finished state, I'd be happy to assist you.

    Our fees for Phase Inspections generally command a Higher contracted rate over an extended period in comparison to a Standard Inspection due to the nature of the Inspection requested.

    Client expectations may vary...


  40. #40
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Nick,

    Whoever came up with the phrase "the customer is always right" didn't know what they were talking about.

    Noooooooo, no, no...that is an employer talking to his/her employee about customer service.

    At the hospital I work at at night I get requests to do things that are insane. My boss/administration thinks I/we should do what ever is asked of us no matter what to *satisfy* the customer whether they are *right* or *wrong* no quetions asked.

    BTW, in *Corporate America*, they (customers) are *never* wrong in the eyes of your employer.

    Sad, but too often true

    Oh...and just one more thing: A few months back a coworker/friend of mine was terminated from the hospital for having a disagreement with a visitor over a stupid TV. The visitor was wrong, but went complaining to administration. Long story short, my buddy lost his job! The powers that be didn't care that my buddy was *right* and the visitor was *wrong*. He made the complaint and that was the end of this guy's career after 7 years of service. Administration is not concerned with right and wrong only the customer survey reports.

    This is one of the many reasons I got into HI so that I could work for myself and get away from that kind of crap.

    Last edited by Tim Moreira; 04-22-2007 at 10:42 PM.

  41. #41
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    There has been plenty of factual argument for "the other side", you just haven't been listening. You operate as you do, because you have "facts", and that makes you right. Therefore, you don't see any merit in remarks made by “the other side”. You view “the other side” as wrong, and making bad judgments in how they choose to conduct business.
    I see merit in an open discussion.
    Here is the "factual argument" you are making:

    I have had some re-inspection requests in which there would have been no way for me to know if the repair corrected the problem such as leakage from a condensing furnace. For those I decline the re-inspection and say why and stress the importance of a detailed receipt as well as warranty info from the contractor.
    Using your quote above, you have no way of knowing if certain repairs were made, like the leaking condensing furnace. Using that as a precedent, you also would not be able to see if plumbing pipes in a wall were repaired, a roof, especially a flat roof was repaired properly and I could go on. You don't inspect the major repair items.

    My question is, what repairs do you inspect?
    Do you do the same thing, a "visual" re inspection that your client could do? Then, you actually charge them for something that they could do?
    How is that serving your client? It sounds like someone extracting every last dollar from a client!

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  42. #42
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    "My boss/administration thinks I/we should do what ever is asked of us no matter what to *satisfy* the customer whether they are *right* or *wrong* no quetions asked."

    Tim, I don't care who is saying it to who. The customer is not always right and is quite often wrong. Your bosses just don't want to deal with the headaches and there are fewer of them if the employees just give the customers what they want (therefore, let the customers THINK they are right). Your bosses know the customer isn't always right and so does corporate America which I was a part of as a C/S supervisor for 5 years prior to HI work. Trust me, I know all about this convoluted notion and the game companies play. And in your friend's case who had his employment terminated after 7 years over a disagreement about a TV, your employer is doing the employees a diservice if they will fire them so quickly over one incident.


  43. #43
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Nick,

    your employer is doing the employees a diservice if they will fire them so quickly over one incident.
    You bet ya...but that is the world we live in.. They are not concerned with the discervice to the employees.

    Very sad but true.


  44. #44
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Do you do the same thing, a "visual" re inspection that your client could do? Then, you actually charge them for something that they could do?
    I trust that you don’t try to talk them out of paying you to perform a visual whole-house inspection – something that they could do?

    I can only speak for my experiences, and 8 to 9 tenths of the folks I run across most likely wouldn't know a repair if it jumped up and shook their hand. So, being a consultant, I provide them with the re-inspection service they’re after. Now, all these silly examples that have come out in this thread are just that, silly. Of course discretion is used when dealing with clients during re-inspections. Part of setting “the table of expectations” includes declining unreasonable requests.

    Did any of you who are dreaming up all these silly "what if" scenarios ever think that maybe, just maybe, part of the re-inspection protocol includes talking a client out of wasting their money for the dumb thing??? Geeesh. Just because I say "I do re-inspections" doesn't automatically mean every time someone requests it. But you can be sure that if the scenario is right, and the expectations are understood, I will.

    How is that serving your client? It sounds like someone extracting every last dollar from a client!
    I’m a consultant. I get paid for my time – that’s it. And if I do a re-inspection, I will certainly collect a reasonable fee for my time.


  45. #45
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Shane, you say that you do some reinspections but not others. Since my scenarios are silly, please enlighten us with what reinspection requests you will accept and which ones you will turn down?


  46. #46
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Pouch View Post
    I trust that you don’t try to talk them out of paying you to perform a visual whole-house inspection – something that they could do?

    I can only speak for my experiences, and 8 to 9 tenths of the folks I run across most likely wouldn't know a repair if it jumped up and shook their hand. So, being a consultant, I provide them with the re-inspection service they’re after. Now, all these silly examples that have come out in this thread are just that, silly. Of course discretion is used when dealing with clients during re-inspections. Part of setting “the table of expectations” includes declining unreasonable requests.

    Did any of you who are dreaming up all these silly "what if" scenarios ever think that maybe, just maybe, part of the re-inspection protocol includes talking a client out of wasting their money for the dumb thing??? Geeesh. Just because I say "I do re-inspections" doesn't automatically mean every time someone requests it. But you can be sure that if the scenario is right, and the expectations are understood, I will.


    I’m a consultant. I get paid for my time – that’s it. And if I do a re-inspection, I will certainly collect a reasonable fee for my time.

    Shane,
    I want to make sure you don't think this is personal with you. It isn't.

    That having been said, the scenarios I listed above were not dreamed up. They happened. They are fact. They happened to me and they can happen to others.

    As for me taking money from individuals for doing a visual inspection that they could do, they couldn't do what I do. I have had electricians and engineers tell me, I wouldn't have seen that or thought about it. Glad I am paying you for it!

    I had one guy who waited until I was almost through with my verbal report to tell me he was an electrician and knew where I was headed. (FPE panel, aluminum wire, every circuit double tapped). The bottom line was about $13,000.00 to rewire the home.

    Most individuals have never heard of FPE panels, aluminum wiring, polybutene, FRT plywood and so on. That is why they are paying me.

    As Nick asked, I too would be curious as to what you would or wouldn't inspect. Also,, why.

    Eric Van De Ven Magnum Inspections Inc. (772) 214-9929
    www.magnuminspections.com
    I still get paid to be suspicious when I got nothing to be suspicious about!

  47. #47
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    Thumbs up Re: Re-Inspections

    I'm doing a re-inspection for this guy tomorrow. How could I say no? Here is his note to me after the inspection.

    "Mr. Whitfield,

    Thank you for being so thorough with the inspection today (especially being
    Easter Monday!). I appreciate you taking the time to explain in detail all
    the issues (especially the safety issues) that should be addressed. Your
    professionalism and personal care for your work is exemplary. I will
    recommend you to all that may need your services. If by chance, you also do repair work or could recommend someone for repairs that takes as much pride in their work as you do l would appreciate your services or advice.

    Thanks again,

    Dale Hon****""

    He knows nothing about a house. That is why he hired me...to look after him. Excuse me while I do my job. The main repair was a rotten floor under the bathtub that had also done damage to the floor joist. Who should he call...another inspector?

    BTW...I did not do the repairs or recommend anyone.


  48. #48
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    I did my re-inspection and the repairs were terrible. The house closes Monday so I am not sure what they are going to do. Again he was most appreciative.
    I will most likely do a third inspection if they buy the house.


  49. #49
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    For Nick O.:

    Those who would believe that the "customer is always right", probably had very few.

    12/12 roof in an ice storm? I believe that somewhere in/on the clients' table of expectations, one should probably find words like no/not/decline, and with or without explanation(s).

    Will you walk the 12/12 in a storm? NO

    Will you pull the panel screws while standing in 3 inches of water? PROBABLY NOT

    Would you mind using my child's trampoline to get through that scuttle hole? I WOULD HAVE TO DECLINE

    In my very humble opinion, in this world we live in, the customer is VERY SIMPLY STATED, N O T A L W A Y S R I G H T ! ! ! ! Would any statement to the contrary not imply perfection? Let me hear from all HIs who have clients who are omnipotent. NOT those who BELIEVE they are, but those who ARE.

    But, as one stated earlier, I remind you that the above is merely an opinion, and I am ALWAYS open to opposing viewpoints. Part of my "risk management" program !


  50. #50
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Van De Ven View Post
    You tell me exactly how you can "visually" tell a roof has been repaired properly with out being there to see the work being done. To use your phrase, I'll be blunt, you can't.
    But that goes for brand new construction, as well. Unless you were there to see it being built, you cannot say that it was built properly. Same difference.

    Re-inspections are a very lucrative part of my business since I charge for my time and knowledge.


  51. #51
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    There is no arguing with folks who have their alleged minds made up and I gave that up last week.
    My goodness, if one’s own insurance carrier will not cover one for doing re-inspects what kind of message will it take to wake one up to reality? Personally I like home inspectors who do re-inspections of corrective work by others and then bless it as acceptable as this scenario has added a tidy sum to my bank account related to my legal EW work.


    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  52. #52
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    What is the correct way to tell a previous client that you will not re-inspect the same house they entrusted to you two weeks earlier? The insurance thing is not going to cut it in my opnion. Too much like "I have already got your money so screw you...I don't need you no more!"


  53. #53
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    James
    Here is a section of California Real Estate Association’s (C.A.R.) contract that practically every RE agent working in our state uses:
    CAR Residential Purchase Agreement – Form RPA-CA (revised 10/02
    10. REPAIRS: Repairs shall be completed prior to final verification of condition unless otherwise agreed in writing. Repairs to be performed at Seller’s expense may be performed by Seller or through others, provided that the work complies with applicable Law, including government permit, inspection and approval requirements. Repairs shall be performed in a good, skillful manner with materials of quality and appearance comparable to existing materials. It is understood that exact restoration of appearance or cosmetic items following all Repairs may not be possible. Seller shall: (i) obtain receipts for Repairs performed by others; (ii) prepare a written statement indicating the Repairs performed by Seller and the date of such Repairs; and (iii) provide Copies of receipts and statements to Buyer prior to final verification of condition.


    Here’s a copy of a common reinspection disclaimer that should be included in all contracts and also within the body of the report.
    All are welcome to modify all or any part of the following as they wish:
    Reinspections are only performed on items not accessible at the time of original inspection or that were unable to be inspected due to utilities not turned on. Should repairs be necessary we suggest appropriate persons perform them and that the work complies with applicable Law, including governmental permit(s), inspection(s), and approval requirements. Buyer should obtain from seller receipts for Repairs performed by others; a written statement indicating the date of Repairs performed by Seller and provide Copies of receipts and statements of seller prior to final verification of condition. (Ref: Residential Purchase Agreement Form RPA-CA, page 4 item 10.)

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  54. #54
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    All that sounds great except you have not helped your client. I agree with getting the receipts and documentation about the repairs but some folks still want/need your advice. Jerry's price for a re-isnpection is not the norm in my area. I'll stop by for a $100 for a hour or so. I'll stop by for free sometimes...can you believe that!


  55. #55
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    You missed the point.

    The point is about "gracefully" getting out of doing a re-inspection.

    Re-inspections are a bad idea. Most seasoned veterans (that are the cream of the crop) say that, not just on this board. Listen to them, even if you don't get it what they say. JUST DO IT.

    What I'm doing is pricing my client out of paying my fee and then I give them a reasonable viable alternative which makes sense to them and saves me a little "face".

    Remember , the ultimate bottom line is protecting you and your family. So if my client thinks I'm providing a dis-service by not doing re-inspection, then so be it. I don't want the payouts and lawsuits that comes with them. You want to limit the number of bullets being shot at you and doing a re-inspection is a bullet I don't want to take.

    And Remember, The Jerryies are waiting for you if screw up


  56. #56
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    "I'll stop by for a $100 for a hour or so. I'll stop by for free sometimes..."

    Ditto here too!

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  57. #57
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by James Duffin View Post
    All that sounds great except you have not helped your client. I agree with getting the receipts and documentation about the repairs but some folks still want/need your advice.
    You are totally missing Jeff's, and our (both West Coast and East Coast Jerry) point.

    Doing a re-inspection *is not* doing your client a service or helping them, *and* it is doing them a disservice, as well as a disservice to yourself.

    THEY are asking you to bless the repair, or tell them it is bad, in which case they will need to call you again to bless the new repair, or tell them it is bad, in which case they will need to call you again ...

    *IF* THEY get the proper documentation and warranties from the "licensed contractors", THEY can hold those licensed contractors to the warranties and correct bad repairs.

    As soon as the HI blesses the repair, the license contractor if (so to speak) *off the hook*.

    Guess who is now *on the hook*? You get four guesses: A) you, B) you, C) you, D) all of the above.

    All that you have not helped you client.

    I sure hope you guys do it for *free*, otherwise, you are taking their money and giving them little, if anything, in return.

    Russel said it most honestly: "Re-inspections are a very lucrative part of my business ... "

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  58. #58
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Jeff...I am the cream of the crop and the Jerry's do not faze me.

    Last edited by James Duffin; 05-12-2007 at 07:38 PM. Reason: Changed phase to faze..

  59. #59
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by James Duffin View Post
    Jeff...I am the cream of the crop and the Jerry's do not faze me.
    Wow!

    Man, I hope to reach that level of self confidence and knowledge one day.

    In the meantime, though, I will be struggling with knowing all that I do not know while I try to find even more that I do not yet know I do not know.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  60. #60
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    James, where in NC are you located?
    I do not see you listed in the NC directory for HI's yet.


  61. #61
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    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    How about when you find problems with a chimney? Chimney crown all cracked up, no rain cap or spark screen and you notice cracked flues down inside.

    You go back, crown looks OK, and now there a nice new rain cap/screen secured to a the top of the flue tile. Can't get the rain cap off because they stripped the bolt head off when they installed it.

    If this was the first part of my inspection, I would say that as far as I could tell, it looks OK. But in this case, I know I saw damage when I looked down the flue, but now I can't.

    As far as telling a client I can't do something because of insurance goes, not a problem for me. Same thing as telling them that I can't give them a termite letter. "I'm not licensed to do that work".

    They don't feel like signing a pre-inspection agreement? Sorry, my insurance company REQUIRES that I have it signed.

    As far as not taking care of my client? My inspection is just one part of the home buying process. I do the inspection and give them the report. I do not set down with them and help them decide what they should ask for, or help negotiate the dollar amounts for the repiars. I don't even tell them what MUST be repaired/replaced or upgraded. I make observations an suggestions.

    My involvement is just one step in a multi step process. You could carry the "customer service" banner too far. I guess if you wanted to be the foremost inspector known for the best bedside manner you could:
    Do the inspection.
    Determine what and who for repairs.
    Select the repair person.
    Go oversee the purchase of materials.
    Supervise the repair process.
    Issue your re-inspection report
    Re-inspect the entire house again, just in case something changed since the original inspection. Find something you missed or that went down in the meantime. The start the process all over again.

    You might also want to help them secure the best possible mortgage rates, direct them to the best homeowners insurance company, etc, etc etc.

    Obviously you have to draw the line somewhere. I draw mine at doing re-inspections. I drew that line because of my insurance company.


  62. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Well as one seasoned inspector, apparently in the minority, re-inspections are part of my service. I am completely confident in doing them and have never had a negative experience. As for the insurance - don't know who some of you are using but they're not covering you is a strange one. My carrier has no such restriction - and yes, I've checked with the underwriter.

    But all of this basically boils down to business decisions that we each have to make. For those in my area that don't do re-inspections, pass my name on to your clients, I'd be happy to accommodate them.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  63. #63
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Eric,

    What E&O carrier are you using?

    Thanks


  64. #64
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Healdsburg, CA
    Posts
    1,741

    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    Whenever I hear a home inspector say. “I’ve never been sued” I usually add under my breath, “yet.” In California the fat lady doesn’t sing until four years after the date of the inspection according to California Civil Code 7199, and until that specific time arrives all home inspectors are vulnerable to litigation. “Blessing” corrective work by others at best doubles the chances of litigation and unless an inspector thinks he/she can make up what the suit may cost them by charging for inspecting corrective work I fail to understand the motive for living so dangerously? Home inspectors are the purveyors of information, no more, no less, and at times much of that information can be of a negative nature. The chief problem is the value of their service is pathetically undervalued by not only the public, but by the inspectors themselves especially when you compare it to the value real estate agents provide and the amount of their reward. (BTW, I like Jack’s comments)

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  65. #65
    Kevin Luce's Avatar
    Kevin Luce Guest

    Default Re: Re-Inspections

    How many times do we go back out and see that the "so called fix" was done wrong. A lot. If you were buying the house, would you want to have that person come back to see if that problem was fixed properly? I would think yes. Charge for you to come back is your choice.

    Why are home inspectors sooo under valued? If we only did one inspection 5 days a week for the average price of $275.00 (the price is the low side of normal around here). That would be $71,500 a year. That is only one job per day for five days out of that week. If you averaged 6 jobs a week for $325.00 (the price is the high side of normal around here). That would be $101.400 a year. I don't know about you, but a one job per day for only five days a week is an easy week. 5 to 6 hours at the most to do the inspection and write up the report and 2 to 3 hours to do the miscellaneous things.

    For a one person business, that is not bad. Of course, if you wanted to make more money per year, this business will allow you by offering add on services. Offering termite inspections in this area normally pays for my E&O insurance. And if we are that good (as a home inspector) then you should be able to charge what ever your want and the other home inspectors prices shouldn't matter.

    Jerry, if you don't mind, what did you charge for a home inspection compared to other home inspectors in your area?


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