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  1. #1
    darryl washington's Avatar
    darryl washington Guest

    Default Pre-cast deck support blocks

    Our continuing education in North Carolina this license year is on decks. Part of the seminar deals with pre-cast deck supports. The seminar states that these blocks must be set below the frost line but the manufacturer claims in their instructions that the blocks can be set on the surface minus grass. They also state that there is a 5 foot height max for 4x4 posts.
    Does anyone have any experience with the code and these devices.?



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  2. #2
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Pre-cast deck support blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by darryl washington View Post
    Our continuing education in North Carolina this license year is on decks. Part of the seminar deals with pre-cast deck supports. The seminar states that these blocks must be set below the frost line but the manufacturer claims in their instructions that the blocks can be set on the surface minus grass. They also state that there is a 5 foot height max for 4x4 posts.
    Does anyone have any experience with the code and these devices.?

    DW: I assume you mean this crap:

    http://www.decorprecast.com/installa...e_DekBlock.pdf

    Looks like DIY junk to me.


  3. #3
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Pre-cast deck support blocks


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Pre-cast deck support blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by darryl washington View Post
    The seminar states that these blocks must be set below the frost line but the manufacturer claims in their instructions that the blocks can be set on the surface minus grass.

    Mostly not allowed, but there are exceptions, such as if the deck is totally free standing and not attached to the house in anyway, then the footings do not need to extend to below frost level.

    There still are, however, uplift requirements in most areas (see link Aaron posted showing that aspect), along with other limitations.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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