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  1. #1
    Joe Nernberg's Avatar
    Joe Nernberg Guest

    Thumbs down A Little Hypocritical

    A new condensing unit was installed by a home warranty vendor. In California, this unit must be raised 3-inches above grade and anchored. No building permit found for same.

    Typically, a home warranty policy will exclude coverage if they can justify an improper installation or code violation. Does this seem hypocritical to you?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,741

    Default Re: A Little Hypocritical

    That is surprising to me, after all, insurance companies, always hire the best and most qualified people to do repairs, without regard to expense.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,517

    Default Re: A Little Hypocritical

    Joe,

    That looks like the typical condo type installation we see around here.

    Grade around here is the soil to installers, so take in consideration the 3-4 inches of that concrete and you have your 3 inches.

    I see they don't strap the electrical wiring there either. Is the disconnect around the corner?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,829

    Default Re: A Little Hypocritical

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Nernberg View Post
    A new condensing unit was installed by a home warranty vendor. In California, this unit must be raised 3-inches above grade and anchored. No building permit found for same.

    Typically, a home warranty policy will exclude coverage if they can justify an improper installation or code violation. Does this seem hypocritical to you?
    You need a building permit in your area to replace a condensing unit?

    The 3" pad or raised height above the grade is the norm around the country from what I have seen. In fact I think many of the manufacturers require them. But the unit in your picture is sitting on a concrete pad already, so unless it is in an area that is prone to high water it would be a moot point raising it up another 3". When the code states "grade", I take that as the earthen ground.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Posts
    613

    Default Re: A Little Hypocritical

    Permits are required here, as well. Apparently, some confusion must have existed. In the attached "What Doesn't require a permit" City link you'll see where they specifically emphasized condensing units.

    Official web site for City of Corpus Christi, Texas

    The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
    - Paul Fix

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