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  1. #1
    Roni Litmanovic's Avatar
    Roni Litmanovic Guest

    Default Floor Condensation

    I have a client who lives in a residential building who is suffering as a result of condensation on his bedroom floor. Apparently, the neighbor downstairs runs his central a/c most of the day and from what I can tell, the concrete slabs are not insulated in any way, on either side. Can you guys help with possible causes of this problem and available solutions? Should the return plenums be insulated also? I dont think the neighbor downstairs has insulation anywhere.

    Thanks,

    Roni

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Floor Condensation

    "Can you guys help with possible causes of this problem..."

    To much moisture in the air


    "... and available solutions?""
    Dehumidify the room

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Floor Condensation

    Quote Originally Posted by Roni Litmanovic View Post
    I have a client who lives in a residential building who is suffering as a result of condensation on his bedroom floor. Apparently, the neighbor downstairs runs his central a/c most of the day and from what I can tell, the concrete slabs are not insulated in any way, on either side. Can you guys help with possible causes of this problem and available solutions? Should the return plenums be insulated also? I dont think the neighbor downstairs has insulation anywhere.

    Thanks,

    Roni
    I think you have figured it out already. The room below is cooler than the room above. The concrete floor is cooler than the air in the room, the RH is high so it does not take much of a temperature differential to reach the dew point and allow condensation to form.

    About the only solution I can think of, would be to run the A/C in the room that has the moisture problem. The A/C will dry the air (remove the humidity), this in turn will lower the dew point in the room and should stop the condensation or reduce it.

    The return plenum does not need to be insulated, but it sure would not hurt anything.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
    Matt Vozzella's Avatar
    Matt Vozzella Guest

    Default Re: Floor Condensation

    This is an unusual occurence. I mentioned it to my boss and his first thought was a leaky/split duct which is forcing air up against the ceiling/floor.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Frankfort, KY
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: Floor Condensation

    You could have multiple issues going on here Roni.

    It sounds like a classic case of building depressurization in a humid climate.

    Have you recorded any temperature readings or any other data in this building?

    Measured Performance more than just a buzzword

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: Floor Condensation

    A dehumidifier would be your best bet at removing basement humidity.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    49

    Smile Re: Floor Condensation

    Similar problem, Monday I'm looking at a Condo with poured concrete ceiling. Problem, at night owner is saying water pours out of ceiling ???
    I'm thinking it's condensation caused by conditioned air difference between these two units. One above the other. I remenber a thread discussing this problem, but searching archives, I can't locate it. Can anyone help me locate the thread. Thanks, love this site.

    Joseph, Palm Bch County, Fl.
    HomeSafeSouthFlorida.com

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