Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: size of unit

  1. #1
    wes owens's Avatar
    wes owens Guest

    Default size of unit

    The unit on that modular home is an International Comfort System commercial unit.

    I looked it up in the Carson Dunlop reference book but it did not list anything.

    I wanted to make sure of the size.

    The model # is PHD360000KTP0C1

    If anyone knows the size or can direct me to a link I would appreciate it.

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: size of unit

    That's a 3 ton condenser. The 36 in the model # is the clue.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,243

    Default Re: size of unit

    Quote Originally Posted by wes owens View Post
    The unit on that modular home is an International Comfort System commercial unit.
    Any time I see a "commercial" something on a residence I check further as not all "commercial" appliances are approved for use in residences too.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    wes owens's Avatar
    wes owens Guest

    Default Re: size of unit

    I figured the 36 or the 60 was the number, but the check off sheet from the manufacturer calls it a 5 ton unit.

    The home is 3,200 s.f. so I want to make sure what the tonnage is.

    Thats why I wanted to make sure how I needed to read it.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,243

    Default Re: size of unit

    Quote Originally Posted by wes owens View Post
    I figured the 36 or the 60 was the number, but the check off sheet from the manufacturer calls it a 5 ton unit.

    That you would need to check on.

    The number in the model number is one digit too long, i.e., 360000 could be 36000 0 or 3 60000 with 36000 as 36,000 Btu or 60000 as 60,000 Btu, with the other digit being some other identifier.

    I'm going to guess that it is 5 ton based on the information on this page: Navigator=

    Although the link for this: PAD3 R410A 2.5 - 5 Ton Technical Support Manual (9-08) is not working so I cannot verify it - but based on the PAD3 ... I would guess that model number is PAD3 60000 ...

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 01-09-2010 at 08:29 PM. Reason: added links
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    1,984

    Default Re: size of unit

    They better hope it's 5 ton, 3 tons of AC is not going to cut it in a warm State for 3200 sqft.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Memphis, TN.
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: size of unit (Determining Capacity)

    Quote Originally Posted by wes owens View Post
    The unit on that modular home is an International Comfort System commercial unit.

    I looked it up in the Carson Dunlop reference book but it did not list anything.

    I wanted to make sure of the size.

    The model # is PHD360000KTP0C1

    If anyone knows the size or can direct me to a link I would appreciate it.

    A ton is equivalent to 12,000 BTUs per hour. One rule of thumb is that one ton of capacity is needed for each 550 square feet of living space. Keep in mind that this is only a guideline; there are many other factors that determine sizing requirements, such as ceiling height, insulation present, heat loss through windows and doors, and direction and amount of sunlight. Almost all systems have a "data plate" located on the compressor-condenser, which includes information such as the model number. Within the model number, the inspector should find a two-digit number divisible by six (such as 30, 36, 42, or 48), which represents thousands of BTUs. Example, a model number 28CC048-2 or BTC480C would have a capacity of 48,000 BTUs (48 times 1000), which is equivalent to four tons (48,000 divided by 12,000). Some manufacturers might also have two- or three- digit numbers at the end of the model number that denote either thousands of BTUs or the actual number of tons (for example 31 would be 31,000 BTUs or 004 would be four tons).


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Memphis, TN.
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: size of unit (Determining Capacity)

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Koen View Post
    A ton is equivalent to 12,000 BTUs per hour. One rule of thumb is that one ton of capacity is needed for each 550 square feet of living space. Keep in mind that this is only a guideline; there are many other factors that determine sizing requirements, such as ceiling height, insulation present, heat loss through windows and doors, and direction and amount of sunlight. Almost all systems have a "data plate" located on the compressor-condenser, which includes information such as the model number. Within the model number, the inspector should find a two-digit number divisible by six (such as 30, 36, 42, or 48), which represents thousands of BTUs. Example, a model number 28CC048-2 or BTC480C would have a capacity of 48,000 BTUs (48 times 1000), which is equivalent to four tons (48,000 divided by 12,000). Some manufacturers might also have two- or three- digit numbers at the end of the model number that denote either thousands of BTUs or the actual number of tons (for example 31 would be 31,000 BTUs or 004 would be four tons).
    If it is possible have a qualified airconditioning professional tell you what the right size unit will be for a size matter. They could also recommend which unit will be the right size and better efficient.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •