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  1. #1
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    Default FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    HEY ALL

    this is in a basement bedroom--is this code. thinking about leaks

    thanks

    charlie

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    EGAD!!!!!!!!!! Hack job.

    What type of leaks are you talking about Charlie? Moisture? Condensate? CO? Combustion gases?

    Was there even an acceptable secondary means of egress in the "bedroom"? Not that it would make this HVAC travesty any better.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    nick

    all of the leaks listed--and funny thing is they pulled permit to add egress-which passed final, but no permit or final on furnace- best room to keep your worst child in

    charlie


  4. #4
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    I don't know what I was doing with that deleted message.

    This is a mess and wrong on many levels. Does code cover stupidity?


  5. #5
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    Don't forget that is supposed to slope uphill and it does not look like it does.

    Also, is that ceiling height at least 7 feet?

    Plus it looks like there is a space above the ceiling which is open, that would need to be sealed.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    Towel warmer?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    Am I seeing single-walled vent connector to wrong (furnace side) elbow/offset being attached to bvent? The elbow/offset offers enough drag, wrong fitting makes it completely wrong.

    Six inch clearance to combustibles for single wall - passing through wall with no sheilding or blocking. That six inches includes the combustible paper label (inventory identification) still glued to the vent connector. No cleanout or service access to vertical bvent. Transition to Bvent questionable. One inch clearance and sheilded/blocked for ceiling/floor cavity to Bvent. Appears horizontal vent connector and elbow are in the path of egress and reduce ceiling clearance making area of bedroom uninhabital - assuming height of door opening is "standard" and not a photographic distortion what I think I'm seeing.

    Would seem the vertical vent was pre-existing the bedroom walls.

    Behind the vent connector & Bvent - is that a return grill or a register?

    Would seem that there was no permit or inspection in the creation of the bedroom, only preparations to make any portion of the basement habital with some other egress point. I cannot imagine that wall containing the vent connector and or its door could have been part of an approved permiting plan or inspection - one wonders what the actual remaining space of the bedroom actually is and if it even meets occupancy requirement size for a bedroom. That entire corner should either be part of the uninhabital utility/furnace room or walled off and protected from the bedroom and egress path, it is uninhabital by headroom hazard.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 02-11-2010 at 10:38 AM.

  8. #8
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    Cool Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    I blew the pic up and it does appear to be a B-vent connector to B-vent. However:
    -improper wall penetration
    -improper ceiling firestop
    -no support
    -questionable pitch
    -lack of physical crash guard/ headroom

    The listing does not require a cleanout on B-vent--you are allowed to attach to the base as shown.

    This appears to be a listed B-vent increaser

    The sticker appears to be a B-vent listing sticker

    You can see locking tabs and the rolled seam at the joints

    I would question the makeup air since this partition was added btw the appliance and vent. Also, is anything else common vented with it? What is your vent rise/ BTU input? I'll bet this is undersized for this long horirzontal offset with low vent rise.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  9. #9
    David Bell's Avatar
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    That job is many things. Code is not one of them.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    I blew the pic up and it does appear to be a B-vent connector to B-vent. However:
    -improper wall penetration
    -improper ceiling firestop
    -no support
    -questionable pitch
    -lack of physical crash guard/ headroom

    The listing does not require a cleanout on B-vent--you are allowed to attach to the base as shown.

    This appears to be a listed B-vent increaser

    The sticker appears to be a B-vent listing sticker

    You can see locking tabs and the rolled seam at the joints

    I would question the makeup air since this partition was added btw the appliance and vent. Also, is anything else common vented with it? What is your vent rise/ BTU input? I'll bet this is undersized for this long horirzontal offset with low vent rise.
    I couldn't get good enough resolution to blow up as you have BH, I'll trust your analysis, thought I saw a tab on the top of the elbow, but I couldn't verify horizontal and saw apparent screw, etc. is why I asked IF that was what I was "seeing" (SW connector & elbow to larger vertical Bvent above ceiling)with poor resolution here even upon blowing up couldn't make out any of the detail, esp the "sticker" as you did. Trusting you're analysis of what material IS present, I agree no cleanout is necessary nor six-inch clearance, and agree that 1" is required from all combustibles.

    I do believe that IS a register behind (in the sofit/bulkhead of the bedroom) blowing directly upon the vent and its offset/elbow which would of course artificially influence the temperature (hot zone/cold zone in summer if AC) and interfere with draft/evacuation of the products of combustion.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: FURNACE VENT PIPE IN BEDROOM

    Charlie,

    Here are some older notes I had for Pikes Peak Regional Building Dept RBC ammended 2003 IRC (limited adoptions of chapters); not sure if applicable for your situation:

    RBC303.4.5 Table 301.5.
    Delete "Rooms other than sleeping rooms" and replace with "All rooms."
    Delete "Sleeping rooms" and replace with "Habital attics."

    RBC303.4.8 Section R304.4. Delete "7 feet (2,133.6 mm)" and replace with "7 feet, 6 inches (2,286 mm)".

    RBC303.4.9 Section R305.1. Delete the first paragraph and replace with the following:
    R305.1 Minimum height in non-habital spaces. Spaces not defined as habital spaces shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet (2,133.6 mm). The required height shall be measured from the finish floor to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
    Delete exceptions 1 and 2.

    RBC303.4.10 Section 305.2. Insert a new section as follows:
    R305.2 Minimum height in habital spaces. Habital spaces shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet, 6 inches (2,286 mm). The required ceiling height shall be measured from the finish floor to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
    Exceptions:
    1. Beams and girders spaced not less than 4 feet (1,218.8 mm) on center may project not more than 6 inches (152.4 mm) below the required ceiling height.
    2.In basements, the required ceiling height may be reduced to not less than 6 feet, 8 inches (2,032 mm) under furred-down beams, pipes and ducts over an area not to exceed 50 percent of the floor area of the room in which the reduction occurs or over a width of not more than 8 feet (2,438.4 mm), whichever is greater.
    3. In other than basements, not more than 50 percent of the required floor area of a room or space is permitted to have a sloped ceiling less than 7 feet, 6 inches (2,286 mm) in height with no portion of the required floor area less than 5 feet (1,524 mm) in height.

    RBC303.4.11 Section R305.3. Insert a new section as follows:
    R305.3 Minimum height in unfinished basements. Unfinished basements shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet, 7-1/2 inches (2,324.1 mm). The required ceiling height shall be measured from the unfinished floor to the underside of floor joists.
    Exception: Beams, girders, ducts or other obstructions may project up to 10 inches (254 mm) below the required ceiling height.
    RBC303.4.14 Section R309.3. Delete the second paragraph.
    RBC303.4.15 Section R309.4 Delete the second paragraph.

    RBC303.4.16 Section R310.1. Delete the first and second sentances and replace with the following:
    All basements, floors other than the floor providing the exit door required by Section 311.5.1 of the IRC, 2003 Edition, and every sleeping room shall have at least one openable emergency escape and rescue opening complying with this section or door complying with Section R311.4.2 of the IRC, 2003 Edition, in addition to the normally provided exit door or stairway complying with Section R311.5 of the IRC, 2003 Edition. The emergency escape and rescue opening or door shall be placed a distance apart from the normally provided door or stairway a minimum of one-third (1/3) of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the floor served. In addition, unfinished basements or portions of unfinished basements more than 500 square feet (46.5 m squared) in gross floor area shall be provided with an additional emergency escape and rescue opening or door for each additional 500 square feet (46.5 m squared) in gross floor area or fraction thereof. These shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked, the others will be available.

    RBC303.4.17 Section R310.1.1. Delete "5.7 square feet (5,295 cm-squared)" and replace with "4.5 square feet (4,181 cm-squared)" and delete the exception.

    I also had a note about vents serving fuel gas mechanicals from either the mechanical or fuel gas code ammendments for PPR BD:

    Enclosure and Support. Portions of venting systems which extend through occupied and storage spaces shall be enclosed to avoid contact with or damage to the installation.

    Venting systems shall be adequately supported for the weight and design of the material used.

    Vent offsets shall be supported for their weight and shall be installed to maintain proper clearance, to prevent physical damage, and to prevent separation of the joints.

    But that (above) may have been (enclosure & support protections) for Propane not NG vents, don't recall.

    Not sure if that might help with your "code" question.

    Lacking support esp offset, verify screw(s) do NOT penetrate inner liner of bvent, sealing/1" offset ceiling penetration; plate, prevention of Makeup/combustion/return air being drawn from/through bedroom wall opening for bvent into mechanical room; etc.


    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 02-12-2010 at 12:07 PM.

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