Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Richard Stanley's Avatar
    Richard Stanley Guest

    Default fuel ga code prior to 2000

    I don't have this. Question: Is there any reference regarding the prohibition of appliance fuel connectors extending through appliance housing as in IRC 2000 2421.1.2 or International fuel/gas code 411.1.2 prior to this code date. I know it is a safety hazard anyway, so the date doesn't matter, but, it's an argument.. I suspect it is also in the manufacturers installation instructions - I may check that later. I've got some techie telling my client that requirement is only a year old. House built in '97 - Flex going thru the furnace cabinet. Any help appreciated - thanks.

    Similar Threads:
    Last edited by Richard Stanley; 07-06-2007 at 01:51 PM. Reason: sp.
    F.I.R.E. Services

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Posts
    613

    Default Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    Just had the same thing, Richard. Ask him if it's any safer because they didn't know in "97.

    Also, from your response, I gather that the installation instructions weren't there. Amend your report to show another infraction. Had thy been there, your question could have been answered.

    As there is no black bar in the 2000 IRC in your reference, I would assume that the edition prior to that one said the same thing.

    The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
    - Paul Fix

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,633

    Cool Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    Just look on the tag at the listed instructions. Some may allow you to penetrate a cabinet as long as it is:
    a) electrically insulated from the cabinet and
    b) protected from being cut by the sheetmetal such as with a grommet.

    The listing is in force from the date of mfr. regardless of local codes. If the listing does not allow it, then it doesn't matter if the codes do---you still should not install it that way if it goes against the listing.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Posts
    613

    Default Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    Bob, My point was that those instructions are to remain at the furnace, I thought. Is that not correct?

    The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
    - Paul Fix

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,633

    Cool Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    That's that little tag a lot of people tear off. However, unlike mattresses and furniture, you won't go to jail for removing it. It can be removed by the "end user", which is usually the homeowner.

    If you cannot find that tag, the mfr. must be identified by marking stamped into either a metal ring that slides along the flex hose or in the nuts themselves. Get your glasses as it is fine print. Smear a lumber crayon over it & wipe. It will leave the wax in the stampings so you can read and usually photograph it.

    Once you've identified the mfr. you can go online and get their info.

    Dormont and Brass craft are the two most common now.


    Just a reminder: if you see brazed ends on an old flex hose, it is one that has been recalled and must be replaced ASAP.

    HTH

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  6. #6
    Richard Stanley's Avatar
    Richard Stanley Guest

    Default Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    Thanks guys
    Thom: Ya gotta luv it! These guys keep us in business. The instructions were not present - usually are not unless new - and often not even then. The F & G codes were incorporated into the IRC 2000 edition - partially. The '95 & '97 CABO didn't have much at all about F & G.
    Ha - the builder told the buyer he would bring the attic roof framing "up to code" for a fee since the code was different in '97 - ie; under sized purlins and sistered rafters!!!! These guys are great.

    Bob, Wouldn't the applicable installation instructions be for the furnace instead of the flex?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,633

    Cool Re: fuel ga code prior to 2000

    Richard, in general, a furnace mfr. is merely concerned with getting gas into his appliance. They usually leave those details to the codes and thereby to any listings of materials used such as CSST and flex connectors. I guess it would depend on what the mfr. is stating. If there is a flat out statement that the piping must be a certain way, then the more restrictive requirement applies. In lieu of such requirements by the appliance mfr., then the default is the codes and listings. The mfr. usually isn't concerned with details on the piping as long as it:
    a) meets code
    b) is sized properly

    Just because a mfr shows a typical installation illustration doesn't make that the law as the only way to install it. There must be a clear cut restriction by the appliance mfr. to trump the codes and flex listings.

    I think we are making a bit of a fuss over this issue so I'll ask everyone to keep in mind the hazards and goals:
    Hazards-damaged line should someone tamper with the drop to the appliance , electrical current pasing through it, ?
    Goals- deliver adequate gas, comply with codes and standards, be serviceable, be functional,?

    The lesson here should be you cannot look for your One Stop Shopping for every answer. Often, you must peel away the layers.

    My personal preference is to use flex connectors whenever possible. Anyone who has turned wrenches on pipe can appreciate the lunacy of stacks of ells, unions, couplings etc. that can all be avoided with one listed part with just two joints. Flex connectors are service friendly--iron pipe is not. I see far more leaks with iron than flex connectors or CSST.

    FYI, the furnace instructions are required by code to be left with the appliance.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •