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  1. #1
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    I'm looking for an installation manual for a Bryant-Carrier natural gas furnace system.

    Specifically I'm looking for information that Bryant-Carrier may have put in the document that indicates their preference for the installation of a "sediment trap" or "dirt leg" (if you prefer) on the incoming gas supply line.

    I don't need code references ... I have all I need there ... I'm past that and need the "manufacturer's" requirements/preferences.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    Default Re: Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    First off you give no indication as to the age or vintage.

    You'd get your reference to the installation must be in accord with the instructions, local codes where more prohibitive, and the national fuel gas code (also referenced by its ANSI standard number) and/or the IFG, whichever is MORE restrictive. If there is no version reference of the standard, it is assumed to be that which was in existance ON THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE (i.e. data plate).

    If the fuel-fired appliance is ancient you also might see references to AGA, etc.

    You'd also if more recent see a date/version number for the ansi standard.

    Does it really matter? IIRC your great state has minimum code thresholds which can only be adopted to more recent ones (and ammendments) if they are more safe/restrictive.

    Finally, IT ISN'T A DRIP or DIRT LEG but a SEDIMENT TRAP (servicable)which is REQUIRED POST VALVE BY THE MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS via the references indicated above, when they incorporate the "standard".

    If the gas valve (not the shut-off) has been replaced with a newer one - you will similarly find the reference on the instructions for same.

    Rarely is the valve made by the branded manufacturer of the appliance.

    So your code references if based to an unamended ANSI standard code version (not locally ammended) are minimum required by the manufacturer by their reference in the instructions (either the entire appliance itself, or with older appliances, the valve manufacturer's instructions which has oftentimes been replaced with a newer one). The purpose is to protect the assembly from cloging from sediment and therefore not function safely.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-20-2010 at 08:20 AM.

  3. #3
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    HGW -

    Thanks for the reply, but you went way past what I was asking for.

    I'm also well aware of the terminology being a "sediment trap". I included "dirt leg" (review my original post) as some folks prefer to call it that and even some manufacturer's refer to same using such ... I know (at least in my view) it is incorrect.

    I didn't even bring up "drip legs" ... you did and I'm not discussing delivery of 'wet gas' here.

    As I noted I am past and don't need the 'code' standards. I have all that.

    I was searching for the manufacturer's installation manual for the Bryant and/or Carrier gas furnace systems.

    BTW - I was able to get it from Bryant-Carrier in the last few minutes. Their "recommendation" is the key I was after. Code and AHJ rules notwithstanding.

    All that being said ... Thanks for your input.


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    Drip legs are not just for "wet gas" supplied by the utility.When you have gas going up into unconditioned space then dropping down, such as is common to route via attics in some areas/older installations condensation can form in the gas pipes, as temperature changes, the environment with the gas pipes/lines changes.That's when the sediment traps serve a dual purpose as DRIP LEGS.Air is often entraned in the delivery systems to reduce the "richness" or adjust the BTU factor of "natural gas" delivery.The condensation at meter is often "blown" from the regulator outdoors when it purges excessive pressures. I was not implying that you personally didn't know the difference between a drip leg/dirt leg and a sediment trap, I was posting for clarification for any reader.


  5. #5
    Elliot Franson's Avatar
    Elliot Franson Guest

    Default Re: Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    Mr. Kienitz:

    From: http://www.docs.hvacpartners.com/idc...i315a-70-5.pdf

    Gas piping must be installed in accordance with national and local
    codes. Refer to current edition of NFGC in the U.S. and the
    NSCNGPIC in Canada.

    Install a sediment trap in riser leading to furnace as shown in Fig
    21c. Connect a capped nipple into lower end of tee. Capped nipple
    should extend below level of furnace gas controls. Place a ground
    joint union between furnace gas control valve and exterior manual
    equipment gas shutoff valve.

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  6. #6
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Bryant-Carrier Furnace install docs ?

    HGW & EF - Thanks so much for the continued in-depth information.

    The doc I got this AM from Carrier-Bryant was similar, but a slightly different model.

    Good thing is that they didn't mince words/images about a sediment trap for the appliance.


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