Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    112

    Default Flex Gas Connector identification

    This flex connector was installed on a 2004 model-year gas-fired furnace.
    The connector "looks" older than this furnace, and if so, would be incorrect as it should be replaced whenever disconnected.
    I haven't seen this type of connector before (or often) and while it makes me think of the "Ameri-Flex" flex connector recall, I'm pretty sure it's not.

    Can anyone identify the manufacturer of this connector, with any qualified insight whether it might be an older connector and/or be part of any recall?

    Dave

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    1,984

    Default Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    A couple things,
    - that does look like one of the old brass connectors; If I had a better brain I could remember what years the SS and yellow coated ones came in to replace those.
    - A lot of Muni's don't allow flex of any kind to a furnace, has to be hardpiped
    - I noticed the old brass valve on the side, those are notorious leakers. I check them with my sniffer, rarely does one not leak.
    Hope that helps.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Exclamation Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    That metal ring or the nuts should be stamped with the identity. If no identifiable marks then it should be replaced. However, as you said, flex connectors should not be reused per the mfrs. Also per mfrs., should not penetrate appliance cabinet. It can be either in or out but not through. Must be sized for load. Longer flex hoses have considerable pressure drop and may not provide adequate flow.

    The recalled connectors have a visible portion with a brazed joint instead of just pressed on nuts.

    HTH,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  4. #4
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    Who cares what type of flex connector it is?

    It is not allowed to be passed through the side-wall of a furnace ... period.

    There is supposed to be black iron from the furnace manifold through the side-wall and then the flex connection can be attached ... assuming it is of an approved product for the local AHJ.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    Uncoated brass appliance connectors would be 20 or more years old, are not safe and should NEVER BE USED - THEY ARE DOWNRIGHT DANGEROUS, and replaced whenever found. Most Gas Utilities will refuse to turn on the gas to a residence that has these (utility "red tag"). Brass connectors have come apart, split, leaked, causing gas leaks that have led to fires and explosions, causing property damages, injuries to persons, and deaths, every year.

    "Water Heater" connectors (corregated copper tube) with brass ends are for potable water plumbing - NOT GAS.



    The corregated tubing pictured has been flexed dangerously right near the end piece - if not already split it will likely soon. MK has already mentioned old style not to present standards, notorious leakers (defective) gas shut off valve.

    The dark discoloration is often found were corrosion holes are present in the tubing of dangerous corregated brass connectors and improperly used dangerous copper potable water heater connectors illegally used for gas.

    Uncoated or coated stainless steel appliance connectors are the standard. You should not see brass ends on gray or yellow coated SS Appliance Connectors, or on Uncoated SS appliance connectors.

    There are also coated brass appliance connectors in the market place, some have been recalled.

    Furnace being fixed in place, and the connector having been COILED INSIDE THE APPLIANCE makes this additionally suspect and unsafe.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Kansas City Missouri
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    The Consumer Product Safety Commision has issued a safety bulletin on older Brass Gas Connectors Danger: Certain older gas connectors may be dangerous

    Galen L. Beasley
    Inspections Supervisor
    Housing Authority of Kansas City MO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Flex Gas Connector identification

    Thanks for all the great feedback.

    Careful Nolan
    Quote Originally Posted by Nolan Kienitz View Post
    Who cares what type of flex connector it is? It is not allowed to be passed through the side-wall of a furnace ... period.

    There is supposed to be black iron from the furnace manifold through the side-wall and then the flex connection can be attached ... assuming it is of an approved product for the local AHJ.
    While I don't advocate it, I have it on good authority that it IS permitted under certain conditions:

    "Thank you for your inquiry. We do permit the Dormont Gas Connector to pass through the furnace cabinet as long as the connector is protected against damage. So basically the knockout hole in the furnace cabinet must have a gasketing or grommet material to prevent “metal-to-metal” rubbing of the connector against the furnace wall. This position is consistent with NFPA 54 (National Fuel Gas Code) Section 9.6.1 (8):

    Thanks for choosing Dormont!

    Mike Angus
    Director - New Product Development
    Dormont Manufacturing Company
    A Watts Water Technologies Company
    6015 Enterprise Drive
    Export, PA 15632
    Phone (724) 387-3411
    Fax (412) 291-3172
    E-Mail: mangus@dormont.com "


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •