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  1. #1
    Jon mackay's Avatar
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    Default Oil furnace vent type

    I am having brain freeze again.

    Single wall vent pipe for an oil fired furnace must be galvanized correct?

    I came across an installation with black pipe.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Oil furnace vent type

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    I am having brain freeze again.

    Single wall vent pipe for an oil fired furnace must be galvanized correct?

    I came across an installation with black pipe.
    Are you asking about a chimney connector (to factory chimney or thimble to masonry chimney)? Black pipe? Huh?

    Reviewed your own threads? http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...l-furnace.html

    Your terminology and descriptions are confusing! Photos?


  3. #3
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    Cool Re: Oil furnace vent type

    What HG is getting at is a connector for a gas appliance is termed a "vent connector" while a connector for solid or liquid fuel is termed a "chimney connector". Since this is an oil fired appliance, you should refer to it as a 'chimney connector' even if it terminates into type 'L' vent for oil.

    NFPA 211 does not state it flat out to use galvanized steel for oil but rather refers you to table 9.2.2.3, which does not mention anything about corrosion resistance but rather pipe gauge relative to diameter. In practice, we use black steel 'stovepipe' for solid fuel applications and galvanized steel for oil and gas but I see no reason why it cannot be used for oil. In fact, I have used black pipe on oil many times and it holds up about as well as the galvanized pipe. Now, you would not want to use galvanized steel connector on woodstoves. Above ~ 800F it gives off toxic zinc vapor and woodstoves can easily hit this temp., though it is close to an overfire condition according to most stove mfrs. (850F).

    HTH,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  4. #4
    Jon mackay's Avatar
    Jon mackay Guest

    Default Re: Oil furnace vent type

    Thank you Bob
    Sorry about the incorrect terminology. I have attached a picture to get my 1,000 words in

    Bob, the title of the the table you referred to is "Table 9.2.2.3 Metal Thickness for Galvanized Steel Pipe Connectors" Wouldn't that suggest that the material must be Galvanized Steel Pipe?

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Oil furnace vent type

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    Thank you Bob
    Sorry about the incorrect terminology. I have attached a picture to get my 1,000 words in

    Bob, the title of the the table you referred to is "Table 9.2.2.3 Metal Thickness for Galvanized Steel Pipe Connectors" Wouldn't that suggest that the material must be Galvanized Steel Pipe?

    Need to call that barometric damper out for being installed incorrectly also Jon.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Oil furnace vent type

    Ugh!

    damper, unsupported length and offsets, rise, leakage or high temperature contact with air ducts and return looks like zinc burnoff (sooting, etc.), cord or cable drop - proximity - exposed wiring, thimble, foil tape on chimney connector, rusting, etc. recycling of spillage/leakage to combustion air and conditioned air, Ugh, Ugh, Ugh.




  7. #7
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    Cool Re: Oil furnace vent type

    My 2010 Edition reads, Table 9.2.2.3 Metal Thickness for Steel Pipe Connectors. In the chart, the third column is labeled "Sheet Gauge No.". No mention of the word "galvanized" in this section. Even if it did, it should be specific such as refering to G-90 or an ASTM std. as the baseline for minimal corrosion resistance.

    The combustion analysis test hole is in the wrong place. I don't see enough screws at some pipe joints. No cleanout in the chimney, which probably is not relined. Lack of proper support, etc., etc.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  8. #8
    Jon mackay's Avatar
    Jon mackay Guest

    Default Re: Oil furnace vent type

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    My 2010 Edition reads, Table 9.2.2.3 Metal Thickness for Steel Pipe Connectors.
    Interesting, They must have changed it, I'm looking at 2002.

    I suppose, I will call out the corrosion along with all the other issues and move on.

    Thanks for everyones help.


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