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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default portable heat pump in "bedroom"

    75 year old home with hot water radiator heat everywhere but the third floor, which is listed as a bedroom. It only has one of those portable heat pumps where you put the ducts in the window and the unit sits on the floor, plugged into a receptacle.
    Is it kosher to call this a bedroom when it doesn't have permanently installed heat?
    I don't expect it to be a big deal. Client wasn't concerned. I'm just curious.

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  2. #2
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: portable heat pump in "bedroom"

    Here is what out city code states:


    (e) Heating.

    (1) Heating facilities. Every dwelling and dwelling unit shall be provided with a heating unit which is properly designed, installed and balanced or adjusted, maintained in good and safe condition and which is capable of safely and adequately heating all habitable rooms, bathrooms and water compartments located therein to a temperature of at least 68 degrees Fahrenheit at a distance of three feet above the floor level when the outside temperature is between 20 degrees Fahrenheit and 68 degrees Fahrenheit. All rooms may vary in temperature by as much as ten degrees Fahrenheit. Either central or space heating units designed for continuous use may be used. Portable or temporary space heaters are strictly prohibited as a primary source of heat, but may be used to supplement heating.

    (2) Central heating units.

    a. Every central heating unit shall:

    1. Have every duct, pipe or tube free of leaks and functioning properly to provide an adequate amount of heat or hot water to the intended place of delivery;

    2. Be provided with proper seals between sections of hot air furnaces to prevent the escape of noxious fumes and gases into heat ducts;

    3. Be properly connected to an electric circuit of adequate capacity in an approved manner if electrical power is required; and

    4. Be provided with all required automatic or safety devices and be installed and operated in the manner required by the laws, ordinances and regulation of the city.

    b. All liquid fuel used to operate any central heating unit shall be stored in accordance with the city's fire prevention and building codes;

    c. All gas and oil heating equipment installed on the premises shall be listed by a testing laboratory and shall be installed in accordance with the provisions of the North Carolina Building Code.

    (3) Space heating units.

    a. Every space heating unit shall:

    1. Not use gasoline or other similar highly flammable liquid fuel;

    2. Not be of portable type using solid, liquid or gaseous fuel;

    3. Be properly connected according to the manufacturer's instructions on installation;

    4. Be so located or protected as to prevent any overheating of adjacent combustible material;

    5. If employing electricity, be connected to a circuit of adequate capacity in an approved manner;

    6. Be provided with all required automatic or safety devices; and

    7. Be installed under permit and be properly operated.

    b. A kerosene space heater which has its fuel piped to the heater from a remotely installed bulk tank shall be permissible under this section. Other portable kerosene space heaters are strictly prohibited as a primary source of heat.

    c. All unvented gas-fired heating units are strictly prohibited, as a primary source of heat.

    d. Ornamental gas logs may be installed in a fireplace provided that such installation is in compliance with the North Carolina Mechanical Code.


  3. #3
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: portable heat pump in "bedroom"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    75 year old home with hot water radiator heat everywhere but the third floor, which is listed as a bedroom. It only has one of those portable heat pumps where you put the ducts in the window and the unit sits on the floor, plugged into a receptacle.
    Is it kosher to call this a bedroom when it doesn't have permanently installed heat?
    I don't expect it to be a big deal. Client wasn't concerned. I'm just curious.
    I think where it is more than just a temp window unit or one of those oil filled units it should be alright. Also the third floor practically never has the heat on anyway as the heat rises from the other two floors.

    Just consider the bottom two floors one big duct to the third floor I think 68 would be the minimum that room would ever be with heat on the other two floors.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    389

    Default Re: portable heat pump in "bedroom"

    [quote=James Duffin;146129]Here is what out city code states:


    . . . . . . . quote]


    Not just your city code, that's in the IMC and the RMC.


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