Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Alan C Grubb's Avatar
    Alan C Grubb Guest

    Default This can't be right

    Sorry origninal post was not what I wanted to know. Posted at two in morning after long day not good thing to do. My appologies for wasting your time. Looked up manual on line and verified information.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Last edited by Alan C Grubb; 06-18-2011 at 06:03 AM. Reason: Incorrect info
    Member Benefits1

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: This can't be right

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan C Grubb View Post
    Found this in home I inspected today. The pipe that is exposed to the interior of the home looks to me to be the exhaust pipe. It is the Carrier xr90series which is high efficiency. But still can't be exhausted into the interior can it?

    I believe that would be a Trane xr90.

    The center pipe is the inlet.

    Trane recommends (reduced HE corrosion, for one thing) but does not require that combustion air be drawn from the exterior:


    TRANE XR90 SINGLE-STAGE FURNACE


    When air is drawn for the interior, some manufacturers recommend or require a 90 degree bend in the intake to reduce the likelihood of accidental obstruction or that debris will fall or be drawn into the intake.

    ________________

    Likely, that is the manual for the furnace sitting between the pipes - if so you can consult the manual for immediate answers to such questions.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Last edited by Michael Thomas; 06-18-2011 at 06:47 AM.
    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: This can't be right

    Alan, did you actually operate the furnace to see if the pipe was the intake or exhaust? If air was being discharged out of the pipe, that would've been a pretty good clue right there.

    Yikes


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: This can't be right

    I think it's a bit confusing because the sight-glass for the burners is below and in line with the intake, and it seems "logical" that the flue would be above the burners (seemed that way to me at first glance, the first time I saw one), but if you pull the access panel it's clear which is the intake and which the exhaust:



    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  5. #5
    Alan C Grubb's Avatar
    Alan C Grubb Guest

    Default Re: This can't be right

    Quote Originally Posted by neal lewis View Post
    Alan, did you actually operate the furnace to see if the pipe was the intake or exhaust? If air was being discharged out of the pipe, that would've been a pretty good clue right there.

    Yikes
    No Neal, it was a forclosure and the gas was off.


  6. #6
    Alan C Grubb's Avatar
    Alan C Grubb Guest

    Default Re: This can't be right

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Thomas View Post
    I think it's a bit confusing because the sight-glass for the burners is below and in line with the intake, and it seems "logical" that the flue would be above the burners (seemed that way to me at first glance, the first time I saw one), but if you pull the access panel it's clear which is the intake and which the exhaust:

    Thanks Micheal your info was helpful.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Cool how stuff works

    one thing to keep in mind with two pipe CAT IV furnaces is the flow and pressure gradients. The combustion chamber is under negative pressure from the combustion blower so it inhales air from the intake pipe and from gaps and cracks in the burner housing. They are not air tight in most cases. The combustion gases travel through the primary heat exchanger Down to the secondary Hx where condensate is extracted and drained. The remaining warm moist fumes then enter the blower to be exhausted out the pipe to the right under positive pressure.

    Since the burner box is under negative pressure and not atmospheric pressure, they have to put a hose port referencing burner pressure to the gas combination valve's manifold pressure regulator. When I set up furnaces, I have to conduct an tedious evolution that includes tapping into this tubing with a tee to get my true manifold pressure for proper adjustment. You don't have this situation with your typical boiler, water heater or gas fireplace.


    BTW, those sight glasses on Tranes are plastic that snap in rather loosely.
    HTH,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  8. #8
    David Bell's Avatar
    David Bell Guest

    Default Re: This can't be right

    The most important question in this install is whether or not there is sufficient combustion air available in this basement and, if there are other appliances requiring combustion air.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •