Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    so so, California
    Posts
    1,769

    Default Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    It's an old Rheem. Someone called them stabilizer rods?
    Thanks in advance.

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Last edited by Marc M; 07-25-2012 at 12:51 AM.
    Inspection Referral SOC
    The MAZZA INSPECTION GROUP
    www.mazzainspections.com
    Level III Thermo-picture-taker-er...er

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,481

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    It's an old Rheem. Someone called them stabilizer rods?
    Thanks in advance.
    NOx rods. Something to do with air quality/pollution (nitrogen oxide?). I believe they were only required in CA.

    You can get more info from google.

    Welks in retrospect.

    Frequently Asked Questions
    http://www.builditgreenutility.org/s...%207.12.11.pdf
    Defective Furnaces Warning in California

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    so so, California
    Posts
    1,769

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    NOx rods. Something to do with air quality/pollution (nitrogen oxide?). I believe they were only required in CA.

    You can get more info from google.

    Welks in retrospect.

    Frequently Asked Questions
    http://www.builditgreenutility.org/s...%207.12.11.pdf
    Defective Furnaces Warning in California
    Thank you Mr Gunner.

    The MAZZA INSPECTION GROUP
    www.mazzainspections.com
    Level III Thermo-picture-taker-er...er

  4. #4
    jacklance's Avatar
    jacklance Guest

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Lennox installed in 2009. I found these the other day on a preventive maintenance. The system has had regular maintenances in fall and spring since it was installed in 2009. I wonder if propane burns hotter than natural gas?What happens to NOX rods in a LP Furnace?


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Quote Originally Posted by jacklance View Post
    Lennox installed in 2009. I found these the other day on a preventive maintenance. The system has had regular maintenances in fall and spring since it was installed in 2009. I wonder if propane burns hotter than natural gas?What happens to NOX rods in a LP Furnace?
    Propane does not burner "hotter". I am on propane and it actually has less inherit energy than nat gas. So, it takes slightly more propane to produce an equivalent quantity of heat than nat gas.
    I would love to be on nat gas as it is substantially cheaper, too.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lon Henderson View Post
    Propane does not burner "hotter". I am on propane and it actually has less inherit energy than nat gas. So, it takes slightly more propane to produce an equivalent quantity of heat than nat gas.
    I would love to be on nat gas as it is substantially cheaper, too.
    Not true, Propane has about 2.5 times the btu per cu.ft. of natural gas.

    END GLOBAL WHINING

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Thompson View Post
    Not true, Propane has about 2.5 times the btu per cu.ft. of natural gas.
    I stand (or sit, in this case) corrected. Funny how you can get the wrong idea on something. A HVAC guy told me years ago that propane had less BTUs and I just took him at his word. Shame on me..........

    Propane Vs. Natural Gas - A Comparison


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Exclamation LP vs. NG

    This comparison is not straight up. While LPG has approximately 2.5 times more energy per cubic volume, that is not the end of the story. To convert from one fuel to the other, you need to usually change the manifold pressure by changing the regulator on the combination gas valve, then tuning the pressure guided by a manometer: usually from 3.5 wci for NG to 10.0 wci for LP both set on 'hi'. The burner orifice and sometimes pilot orifices and sometimes even burners and their air shutters will need to be changed out or adjusted. The net result is the same approximate input BTU rate of the listing for the appliance. The actual flame temperature is about 195F hotter with LP but that can vary. You see, both gases as delivered are blends. There are other various hydrocarbons mixed in either on purpose or left in as a result of refining or the lack thereof. The higher the content of these heavier hydrocarbons, the higher the BTU content. This means adjustments may need to be made to the appliance for proper operation. However, if you adjust the appliance to the same adiabatic flame temp. and BTU input on the same heat exchanger and conditions through the HX remain the same (water or airflow, density, temp, etc.) then there is no change in output.

    Now, since your technician should be using a combustion analyzer to test and tune every combustion appliance, the results of a properly adjusted appliance may vary somewhat from the rating plate. For instance, when switching fuels, the technician makes certain adjustments such as increasing the manifold pressure above 3.5/ 10.0 benchmarks. As long as the temperature rise and total BTU output are within the rating plate, it should be fine. Now, on a comparable model appliance, it may require turning the pressure down for some reason. There is no rhyme or reason to it but the analyzer does not lie.

    Now, let's look at your appliance's efficiency: You think its delivering the stated AFUE on the hang tag but let me assure you those numbers are a joke. Without going into a day long dissertation on it, trust me, those percentages are way high from reality. Now, those numbers are primarily based upon the burner on 'hi'. How efficient is your furnace when on low fire? Not very. In fact, miserable. You think you're saving money when you really aren't. A single stage burner properly tuned can be a lot more efficient than a fancy multi-stage variable speed job with the flux capacitor. So, in short, there is a LOT more to your point about switching fuels to save a buck.
    HTH,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Can I get a name for this part(s)?

    And keep in mind that a goodly amount of populated Colorado is at or above 5,000 ft elv. above sea level and many homes 2,000 ft or more above that 5,000 ft i.e. derating adjustments - reduced orafice, etc. less O2 available for complete combustion, thinner atmosphere, less pressure water not vaporizing (boiling) at 212F, etc. So your "efficiency" comparisons are further complicated depending on the application.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •