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  1. #1
    M Kelekci's Avatar
    M Kelekci Guest

    Default 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    House got high ceilings, 2100sf. HVAC unit 3.5 ton. I don't think it is big enough to cool the heat load in the house. How would you all word it out on the report?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    York SC Licensed in NC and SC
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Sounds like this is beyond the scope of an inspection but if you want to try to figure it "partially"......

    Need to know SEER rating of unit.
    1 or 2 story house?
    1 or 2 thermostats zoning system present?
    Siding material, foundation material, window ratings, number of windows and sizes, attic insulation type and thickness, wall thickness..

    See where this is headed?


  3. #3
    M Kelekci's Avatar
    M Kelekci Guest

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    What does SEER have to do with the heat load and tonnage calculations?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
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    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Matt,

    Being in the Houston area, it is probably considered undersized.

    In the Dallas area, most HVAC contractors figure about a 1 ton per 1K of square footage.

    With the humidity and heat in Houston, I would expect the same.

    Most homes I see of that square footage here would have at least a 4-ton and most would have a 5 ton.

    rick

    Last edited by Rick Hurst; 09-23-2007 at 02:08 PM.

  5. #5
    M Kelekci's Avatar
    M Kelekci Guest

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Matt,

    Being in the Houston area, it is probably considered undersized.

    In the Dallas area, most HVAC contractors figure about a 1/2 ton per 1K of square footage.

    With the humidity and heat in Houston, I would expect the same.

    Most homes I see of that square footage here would have at least a 4-ton and most would have a 5 ton.

    rick
    Did you mean 1 ton per 500 sf?


  6. #6
    M Kelekci's Avatar
    M Kelekci Guest

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Quote Originally Posted by Fritz Kelly View Post
    I make no determination as to whether the unit is sized adequately for the square footage of the home. Consider having the unit evaluated for proper sizing by a licensed HVAC contractor.
    If you are calling for a HVAC contractor evaluation, aren't you kind of making a determination that unit is not sufficient?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
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    4,517

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Matt,

    Yes I did, and I edited my comment.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Garland, TX
    Posts
    605

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Quote Originally Posted by M Kelekci View Post
    If you are calling for a HVAC contractor evaluation, aren't you kind of making a determination that unit is not sufficient?
    What checks/tests did you do during your inspection?
    You obviously found some other issues, I'd hope.
    While the HVAC guy is out there have him size the system and let him make the call.

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
    Commercial-Residential-Construction-EIFS-Infrared Thermography
    life is the random lottery of events followed by numerous narrow escapes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    2,332

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    I guess it really depends on your area. In Knoxville, that would probably be fine.
    JF


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Miami, Florida
    Posts
    230

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    Air conditioning sizes are done by calculations. I believe it is a Manual J calculation. Rule of thumb is 500 to 600 square feet per ton, but that is only a rule of thumb and may not always be correct. I have, on occassion (once or twice), informed my client that I was not sure if the unit was sized right, and told them that it is done by equasion, and leave them with the option to have a licensed AC company verify the proper size.

    Bill Siegel
    Florida Home Inspection Team Inc.

  11. #11
    Seth Hughes's Avatar
    Seth Hughes Guest

    Default Re: 3.5 ton for 2100sf house

    A home inspection does not involve the calculations of heat gain necessary to decide if the cooling capacity on a building is adequate, but the inspector is expected to examine and report on the rated system capacity (such as "36,000 BTUH") and on the presence or absence of cooling sources in the habitable rooms of the building.
    A simple rule of thumb for relatively cool climates such as the Northeastern United States: one ton per 400 sq.ft. (Commercial) or one ton per 500 to 1000 sq.ft. (Residential) or one ton per 400 to 800 sq.ft. (Space Pak Systems). . Or a 3000 sq.ft. house may require a 5-ton unit. Or count the supply outlets: 10 outlets @ 100 cfm (estimated) = 1,000 cfm = 2.5 tons needed.


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