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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,365

    Default PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    Is this a problem or just a bad idea?

    Wood stove insert and 90+ furnace vents about 6" apart at the top of a chimney. The pipe is only about 3 years old and is covered with soot but not melted or otherwise damaged.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    I can't see why the furnace vent should be taller than the chimney. If it was shorter, it wouldn't catch the soot.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    The intake side may be an issue. Rheem's instructions for a 90+ call for 3 feet of clearance to any other exhaust. Not sure if they consider the flue an exhaust or not, or if there is 3 feet present there.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    Is this a problem or just a bad idea?

    Wood stove insert and 90+ furnace vents about 6" apart at the top of a chimney. The pipe is only about 3 years old and is covered with soot but not melted or otherwise damaged.

    A 90+ furnace uses a forced air combustion chamber, like all other high efficiency units. The pipe in question appears to be exhaust, and therefore, soot contamination from the flu stack, into the furnace, is not a problem. Considering the presence of soot on the pipe, it is possible that there could be sufficient heat from the flu, to deform and possibly shrink that pipe. This pipe should be shortened and elbowed away from the flu. Also, with the exhaust positioned vertical, it is possible for sufficient rain water to enter the pipe, and corrode the heat exchanger.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    1. Why is the exhaust reduced at top? Is it okay as per manufactures instructions?
    2. PVC Schedule 636 is rated for 65 deg. Celsius. (149 deg F.)


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: PVC vent next to wood stove flue

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Roberts View Post
    A 90+ furnace uses a forced air combustion chamber, like all other high efficiency units. The pipe in question appears to be exhaust, and therefore, soot contamination from the flu stack, into the furnace, is not a problem. Considering the presence of soot on the pipe, it is possible that there could be sufficient heat from the flu, to deform and possibly shrink that pipe. This pipe should be shortened and elbowed away from the flu. Also, with the exhaust positioned vertical, it is possible for sufficient rain water to enter the pipe, and corrode the heat exchanger.

    The installation instructions will call for the pipe to be vertical. The system is designed for moisture to come down the PVC exhaust and be handled by the condensate drain at the bottom.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

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