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Thread: First timer

  1. #1
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    Default First timer

    Hey guys! So as I walked through the basement of this home I saw the oil tank had some staining around the top where the fill pipe went in. Is this so,etching that should be of major concern to the client or is this fairly normal from maybe overfilling or something. I also saw that the oil filter had oil all over it as well. Just. Wondering if this is all ok and if not how should I word it? Thanks guys!!!!!!

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: First timer

    The red sleeve appears to have been where one would typically see a fuel level gauge. Looks like its now a breather vent.

    Oil staining could be from oil over fill, but those threads should have been sealed. Overflow is not common as the tank breather pipe should have a whistle to let the supplier know the tank is reaching its fill point.

    Oil staining could also be a result from when the pipes were threaded on site using cutting oil.

    For my liking I think I would have run my finger along the stain and take a smell to ascertain if its actually fuel oil smell.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: First timer

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    The red sleeve appears to have been where one would typically see a fuel level gauge. Looks like its now a breather vent.

    Oil staining could be from oil over fill, but those threads should have been sealed. Overflow is not common as the tank breather pipe should have a whistle to let the supplier know the tank is reaching its fill point.

    Oil staining could also be a result from when the pipes were threaded on site using cutting oil.

    For my liking I think I would have run my finger along the stain and take a smell to ascertain if its actually fuel oil smell.
    Thanks!! So what about the oil filter itself ? It has oil all over it is that normal ?


  4. #4
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    Default Re: First timer

    The oil filter has two seals,
    1) under the top bolt
    2) between the top and base

    Each new filter pack typically comes with both seals, but often the top one is not replaced. Causing some leakage, which is probably what you are seeing.

    I also agree with possible leakage from being over filled at some time. It is not a large amount and I would not be to worried about it. If concerned, take some paint thinner and clean off the oil and then monitor to see if there is a recurrence.

    What you might be more concerned is the age and discoloration at the bottom end seam. I can not tell from pict,, but water accumulates in the tank and sits on the bottom and will cause the tank to rust through from the inside out. What you do not want to do is poke at it with oil in the tank unless you are prepared to plug a leak that you may create.

    Last edited by Garry Sorrells; 12-19-2016 at 07:38 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: First timer

    In my experience its not uncommon to see a stained filter. That happens when the filter is changed out. That does not rule out a leak however.

    Insurance wise at least up here in Ontario. Insurers will dictate tank be replaced anywhere from 10 years and up old.

    Tanks tend to last longer inside than outside due to temperature changes with outside tank and condensation forming in the tank.

    There should also be a brass plate on the tank indicating gauge thickness of steel, manufacturing date and underwriters mark.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: First timer

    Aaron

    Here are two photos for your info.

    1. Note the oil stains on top of tank at filler and breather. This was not an oil over fill problem but left over stains from oil used in the pipe cutter at time of installation.

    2. Also second photo is of the data plate typically found on an oil tank.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: First timer

    What's an oil tank...

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: First timer

    Crude oil, diesel Fuel & heating oil exposure effects are toxic anyway you look at it.
    You want to limit exposure. Health and safety hazards are obvious.

    Observation. Suspect furnace heating fuel on the oil tank.
    a. Vapor odor, b. oil residue on the tank. c.bare pipe threads, d.lack of fuel level gauge, e. unknown couple on the tank and filler pipe.

    Exposure to low levels of fuel oil chemicals may cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin of healthy individuals. People with lung and respiratory ailments such as asthma or other lung diseases may be more sensitive to these effects.
    NOTE: "Breathing fuel oil no. 1 vapor for periods as short as 1 hour may make you feel nauseous, increase your blood pressure, be irritating to your eyes, or make your eyes bloodshot. Breathing kerosene or JP-5 vapors can also affect your nervous system.

    Recommend: A licensed HVAC company or heating fuel supplier evalaute and correct any defects in the tank and fuel piping.

    I see many grew up with heating oil as I did. I worked with liquid and gas fuels a good part of my adult life. Now I see the safety implications.

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: First timer

    Aaron

    Another issue I see in your photo is the copper supply line from the tank to the furnace is no longer acceptable (in Ontario). The new standard is orange plastic coated copper lines. Over time copper lines in contact with concrete (either buried in concrete floor or running above the concrete) can fail. Concrete mixtures that contain components high in sulfur, such as cinders and fly-ash, which can create an acid that is highly corrosive to most metals including copper.

    Further, the supply line must be continuously plastic-coated copper from the tank to the furnace with no unions or connections.

    Best,


  10. #10
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    Default Re: First timer

    Tank outside is the way to go here.
    Tank in the basement, new owners have a hard time getting insurance, lender requires insurance, deal collapses because the seller refuses to put the tank outside. Half the time, the tank has to be cut up to get it out. More toxic waste to dispose of.

    Tank outside, oil stain on the ground? We used to ignore a small patch, but now ... toxic waste issue.
    Even worse if there is any way for fuel oil to leak into a storm drain that feeds a creek. That is lawsuit territory.
    An old couple here were amazed to learn their oil line had been nibbled on by a rat, and subsequently they had killed 10,000 fish.

    We call for a tank inspection every 10 years. Mostly people are better off to upgrade to gas furnace or heat pump.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  11. #11
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    Default Re: First timer

    John removing the staining is not complicated. Several good products. Insurance companies here do not mind inhouse oil tanks. It appears there are a couple of piping defects and deficiencies going on as posted below.

    Even if you can not see/observe the oily film on the surface of an object, the tank or concrete,which are hard to see with the naked eye at times, does not mean vapors are not causing health concerns or hidden safety risk.

    During one home inspection I smelled heating fuel and the owners and REBroker denied anything. My client had no sense of smell. The homeowner and REBroker unpleased with my images and narrative. The home had been poorly remodeled. I returned to the home the next day with my Bacharach Leakator 10. I stuck the sniffer between the floor joist and the united started chirping immediately. I decreased the sensitivity to very low, the lowest sensitivity, just to make my point as the sniffer sang away.
    Gess Louise, there are enough older colleagues here to remember spontaneous combustion. I am kind of awe struck as to see posts referring to missing components.

    It appears to be an older tank and leaking components.
    Ray hit the nail on the head with the copper pipe being prohibited.
    Gees Louise, never could understand why they buried oil fuel copper piping in concrete or ran it under flooring when I started in this business. Not the smartest idea and that pipe WILL LEAK!

    Recommend a licensed HVAC company evaluate clean, repair or replace. 10 word narrative.

    As well, with the cost of oil and gas on the rise, mainly due to the conservatives draining the best of the swamp into their cabinet, it might be an idea to mention updating to another form of energy. A well placed narrative would paint, yearly financial paybacks due to lower energy costs as well as improving the overall cost of the home. You know the old saying. Pay me now or pay me later.

    If you think it was bad under Obama, you were all bamboozled by the antichrist.
    Hang on to you seats and buckle up. You have all be swindled by the swamp salesman and big industry lobbyist. Those who voted that way deserve every bump and crash you get. The ones who didn't, are borders are open. We have free and paid medicare.

    Last edited by ROBERT YOUNG; 12-22-2016 at 02:24 AM.
    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
    Our Motto; Putting information where you need it most, "In your hands.”

  12. #12
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    Default Re: First timer

    • One litre of leaked oil can contaminate 1 million litres of drinking water.
    • A pinhole in your tank can empty 1,000 litres of oil.
    • Cleanup of an oil spill can involve everything from replacing the tank and supply lines and removing contaminated soil, to replacing your home’s foundation.


    3 Steps in Prevention
    How to make sure your oil tank is safe:
    Make sure your tank is installed properly by a professional and is ULC or CSA certified. Poor installations are a major cause of damage. Never purchase a used oil tank - the risks associated with taking an old tank are high. The most serious damage to oil tanks (and hot water tanks) occur from the inside out.
    Have your furnace and tank professionally checked and serviced at least once a year. Make sure they change the filter, inspect the integrity of the tank, and remove any excess water or sludge to avoid/reduce corrosion.
    Don't wait for a problem before you replace the tank. The average recommended time line to replace a tank is about 10 -25 years depending on the tank itself and its location - make sure to check the specifications for maintenance and expected lifespan for your tank specifically. Even 10 years sounds like a safe number, but if we look at the data in this study (p.6), there is a very high incidence of damage and claims from oil tanks in the 6-10 year range - up to 44% of claims. That's not a small number.



    Residential Oil Tanks: A Small Leak That Can Lead to a Big Pay Day | Fireman Steinmetz Daya LLP Fireman Steinmetz Daya LLP
    https://www.sgicanada.ca/mb/individu...s/fueloil.html
    Heating oil tank safety: Fuel Oil &Heating Oil Storage Tank Explosion & Other Hazards - Oil Storage Tank Safety, Leaks, Fumes, Vapors, Explosions, Cave-Ins, Deaths
    Leaking home-heating oil tank leaves financial nightmare for Saanich neighbours
    https://www.caaquebec.com/en/at-home...jet/oil-tanks/

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
    Our Motto; Putting information where you need it most, "In your hands.”

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