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  1. #1
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Furnace Combustion air.

    Condo. Furnace in closet outside kitchen door in common area hallway. Solid door.Upper and lower combustion air vents behind furnace that go to small closet in the unit. No louvers on this closet door. Coats etc blocking vents. Question does this seem workable if interior closet door was louvered.
    Would it not be better to put high and low openings on common hall/furnace door?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default Re: Furnace Combustion air.

    I don't see how you can have the wall vents going into a closet, regardless of whether the interior closet door is louvered, for the very reason you mentioned - the vents are going to be blocked with clothes, etc. The 2006 IRC says "rooms" communicating directly with the space in which the appliance is installed shall be considered part of the require volume (50 cubic feet per 1,000 BTU input), and I thought I was going to find that a closet is not a room, by definition, but it is, in fact, a "small room". I suppose you could make the argument that no matter where the vents are located, they could be blocked.
    Anyway, I vote for installing vents in the furnace closet door, assuming that you then get the required minimum volume.
    What's on the other side of the "interior closet"? Not a bedroom, I hope.


  3. #3
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: Furnace Combustion air.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    I don't see how you can have the wall vents going into a closet, regardless of whether the interior closet door is louvered, for the very reason you mentioned - the vents are going to be blocked with clothes, etc. The 2006 IRC says "rooms" communicating directly with the space in which the appliance is installed shall be considered part of the require volume (50 cubic feet per 1,000 BTU input), and I thought I was going to find that a closet is not a room, by definition, but it is, in fact, a "small room". I suppose you could make the argument that no matter where the vents are located, they could be blocked.
    Anyway, I vote for installing vents in the furnace closet door, assuming that you then get the required minimum volume.
    What's on the other side of the "interior closet"? Not a bedroom, I hope.
    Condo built in the 60's. Closet goes to living room.


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