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  1. #1
    Tim Miller's Avatar
    Tim Miller Guest

    Smile AC Coil Installation

    Can an AC coil be installed backwards on the unit. the unit is aged by some 12 -15 years and is a seperate unit connected to a gas furnace. I amsorry that I dont have a picture to illustrate the type of coil.
    thanks for any input.
    Tim

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Elmont, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    The inlet / outlet orientation should not matter on most installations (horizontal) to the air flow. Of course flipping it upside down would create condensate drain issues on vertical A-coils or any coil assembly with integral drain pan.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Elmont, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    On a 12 to 15 year old unit, if you are having air flow problems, I would be willing to bet the coil needs a good cleaning, especially if filter maintenance has been negligent.

    I have seen drastic improvements in capacity after a good cleaning. (Surface cleaning doesn't quite do it)


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,314

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    By the time you do a "good cleaning", which requires removal of the coil.

    I always advised my clients to "put an extra $100 or so in and just have a new coil installed, by the time you pay to have the old coil cleaned, you still have an old coil which is not-as-clean-as-new, yet you have almost paid that much just to clean the old coil ... replace the coil with a new one".

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Darrell Udelhoven's Avatar
    Darrell Udelhoven Guest

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    By the time you do a "good cleaning", which requires removal of the coil.

    I always advised my clients to "put an extra $100 or so in and just have a new coil installed, by the time you pay to have the old coil cleaned, you still have an old coil which is not-as-clean-as-new, yet you have almost paid that much just to clean the old coil ... replace the coil with a new one".
    Also, ask if they want a more efficient thermostatic expansion valve (TXV) metering device on it.

    Of course, if it is not a Scroll compressor it may also need a start kit. I wouldn't have an evaporator w/o a TXV refrigerant metering device on it.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    As others have said, for a horizontal unit the orientation of the coil (front to back) makes no difference. From an installation stand point it is often times more efficient to put the coil on "backwards" in order to get the line set to the coil on a more direct path.

    An additional note about putting in a new coil versus cleaning. If the current unit is 10 to 15 years old, it is probably an R22 refrigerant type. A new coil could be put in; however, a decision needs to be made to go with an R22 coil OR and R410A coil. The refrigerants are not compatible. If a new R22 coil is put in and the condensing unit goes out next summer - then a new R22 condensing unit will have to be put in OR an entire new 410A system put in. R22 is getting VERY expensive compared to R410A.

    The upshot to this thought process is either keep the current R22 running as long as possible - especially if it is not leaking or otherwise in poor repair OR go ahead and switch out system to a new 410A. Just food for thought!


  7. #7
    Patricia Williams's Avatar
    Patricia Williams Guest

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    I have a real problem and would appreciate your input. We have zoned heat and air. Last
    week the downstairs compressr stopped running. The service person said it was on Freon,
    but the problem was the coil. He said it was leaking Freon and needed to be replaced. It
    was installed in 2003. I was given a quote of $2055 to replace it. HOWEVER, another
    service person at Sears told us it could no be replaced unless we also replaced the
    outside compressor because the new coils were not compatible the "older" compressors.

    HELP!

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have a real problem and would appreciate your input. We have zoned heat and air. Last
    week the downstairs compressr stopped running. The service person said it was on Freon,
    but the problem was the coil. He said it was leaking Freon and needed to be replaced. It
    was installed in 2003. I was given a quote of $2055 to replace it. HOWEVER, another
    service person at Sears told us it could no be replaced unless we also replaced the
    outside compressor because the new coils were not compatible the "older" compressors.

    HELP!

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have a real problem and would appreciate your input. We have zoned heat and air. Last
    week the downstairs compressr stopped running. The service person said it was on Freon,
    but the problem was the coil. He said it was leaking Freon and needed to be replaced. It
    was installed in 2003. I was given a quote of $2055 to replace it. HOWEVER, another
    service person at Sears told us it could no be replaced unless we also replaced the
    outside compressor because the new coils were not compatible the "older" compressors.

    HELP!


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,314

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Patricia Williams View Post
    I have a real problem and would appreciate your input. We have zoned heat and air. Last
    week the downstairs compressr stopped running. The service person said it was on Freon,
    but the problem was the coil. He said it was leaking Freon and needed to be replaced. It
    was installed in 2003. I was given a quote of $2055 to replace it. HOWEVER, another
    service person at Sears told us it could no be replaced unless we also replaced the
    outside compressor because the new coils were not compatible the "older" compressors.

    HELP!
    If you order a new coil based on dimensions of what will fit ... the coils might be different.

    However, if you order a coil for a specific make/model ... then the coil should be an exact replacement for your older coil.

    Now to the "newer" versus "older" coil difference - my understanding is that the "newer" R410A refrigerant coils are able to withstand greater pressure than the "older" Freon refrigerant coils - so it would seem to me that the main thing would be that it is a suitable replacement for the coil in your older unit, i.e., size, proper ability to transfer heat (Btu/hr rating per CFM air flow), tubing is of proper size same, etc., etc.

    Hopefully one of our guys with A/C technician training will address it better.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    2,332

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    I would think it would be very difficult to find a coil to replace a 12 year old unit and not have a problem with mismatching old technology and new technology.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,829

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    Call a small local HVAC contractor and get a third opinionů. At twelve years of age that system has had a good life and should be replacedů

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,112

    Default Re: AC Coil Installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    Call a small local HVAC contractor and get a third opinionů. At twelve years of age that system has had a good life and should be replacedů
    13 years old, don't spend much money on the old system. The average life expectancy in Texas is 12-15 years. The refrigerant compatibility issues are real and can create a problem and additional expense. The cheapest in the long run will likely be total replacement. Get the highest SEER rating you can afford. Check references on the installer. Sears is NOT the company I would trust with a central HVAC system since they likely just hire subcontractors to do the work and charge a bit more for their profit. Try to use smaller (mom & pop) companies with a good reputation in the area.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

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