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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Osceola, AR
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    Default Typical Inspection day

    Thursdays first inspection began as usual.

    No utilities on when I arrived at the home, agent got there a few minutes later to tell me that everything would be turned on before I was finished. I replied that the home had been winterized and that someone needed to dewinterize the home. Agent said she was taking care of that. I moved on to the roof and exterior inspection, agent came out with a meter key and asked me to turn on water at meter. Sorry, can't do it I reply and went about my walk around.

    Agent is now yelling out the window to ask if I will turn on the breakers at the service panel. Sorry, cant do that I reply. Client shows up about 20 minutes in and is not happy as they paid to have the dewinterization done.

    Agent convinces appraisers helper to turn on water meter and immediately starts yelling to turn water off. TPR valves and drains on all water heaters are open and they are flooding the attic, garage and the master bathroom now, of course the Water heaters are not in pans.

    Agent now wants to know if I brought a shop-vac? Her inspector always brings a shop-vac, she cannot understand why I would not have one.

    I finally make my way inside the home, agent is now ready to turn water back on while she works on cleaning up the mess. I ask if she made sure that the water heaters supply valves were open before turning on the breaker. Of course she had! or so she said. Now the water begins to pour from the ceiling over the dining room and people are running to shut off the water again. I take a quick look in to the attic where I see a copper supply line with blue tape in two areas about six inches apart. A quick glance at the line reveals a 5 inch long split where the pipe had frozen and burst.

    Meanwhile, the appraiser, who is at least 80 years old and barely able to move around has begun to examine the home and he wants to question me about the homes condition. As deftly as possible I move into another room so that I don't have to work around him. Later as I am explaining some details to my client the appraiser informs me that he requires a copy of my inspection report. I tell him that decision is up to the buyer. The buyer has become upset with the entire process and informs appraiser that she will need to speak to her husband before giving a copy of the report. The appraiser then informs the buyer that he will delay the mortgage until he receives a copy of the inspection report. I take my client aside and tell her that it may not be in her best interest to release a copy to the appraiser and she agrees. The appraiser becomes agitated because I tell him that I will not release a copy without the clients approval. I then ask the appraiser if I can get a copy of his appraisal which he flatly refuses and says that only the mortgage company is entitled to the appraisal.

    Typical inspection for me. Agent, appraiser, appraisers helper all in attendance with brief cameo appearances by the service tech from the gas supplier (who red tagged each and every gas appliance in the home), a plumber and his helper to give a quick estimate on the broken pipe and the three water heaters that now need new elements, two workers from the water utility who wanted to know who gave permission for the water to be turned on at the meter, and the client and her daughter. Two thirds of the way through the inspection the client gives me my check, informs me that they will continue to look for a home and that they will be calling me to do a full inspection on the next home that they consider.

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    Inspection Referral SOC
    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
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    3,177

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Holy crap. I will never complain about an inspection again.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    2,365

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    That's fantastic! And as I sit here and smile I can just picture myself being there. Many days I wished I smoked because I'd like to have an excuse to go stand at my truck out front and watch "the circus" - the phone calls, the blame, the furry, the confusion, the chaos. I really feel bad for (and try to help out) my buyers in the firestorm that is taking place. It's too bad because most times they actually think what's taking place is out of the ordinary..... so sad that it's just another day for everyone else involved.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Osceola, AR
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    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    For the most part I carried on as usual. Plumber asked if there were other issues besides the leaks and now non-working water heaters? My reply? Oh yeah!

    Service tech from gas supplier was scratching his head and looking lost, said he hated to red tag every gas appliance in the house, I then pointed him to the heating unit in the shop and the pool heater. They received tags also.

    The real estate agent was coming unglued with all the issues, and it didn't help that I reminded her that she had nearly two weeks to have the home dewinterized by the maintenance contractor. Another agent who will now remember me for the rest of her career!

    My client was amazingly calm for all that was going on, and for the most part she did a good job of maintaining her composure throughout the entire process. She did apologize several times for all that was transpiring. I told her repeatedly that this was actually pretty typical of a foreclosure purchase. I don't think she believed that at first but she slowly came around.

    One of the best parts of the day was seeing the appraisers helper, the appraiser, the agent and the two fellows from the water utility going at it over turning on the water at the meter without approval! The appraisers helper was in it because when the water guys asked who turned on the water I threw the helper under the bus. "That's him right there"! and they turned on him like a couple of sharks. The appraiser got caught in it because he can hardly move and could not get away in time to avoid the backlash, and of course it all ended up in the lap of the agent.
    I really need to start taking a video camera on inspections, some of this stuff would be great on you tube.

    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
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    885

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Quote Originally Posted by Alton Darty View Post
    ... Snipped ...
    I really need to start taking a video camera on inspections, some of this stuff would be great on you tube.
    Better, sell tickets to the clown act.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,777

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Alton,
    Would have loved to see that video, sounded good enough to be a Three stooges movie. Kinda of wondering how the agent will explain the damage to the property, actually would like to see that as a video also to see how the lies fly and a two step is begins .

    A little strange that the appraiser was there since the inspection is typically a contract contingency to be removed by the client. I hope that the client will leverage the mortgage application fee, appraisal fee and Home Inspection fee back against the agent who destroyed the house that they would have bought if it weren't for the actions of the agent. Do hope that the client takes that direction. Would love love to be there to hear that agent sequel.

    Have to laugh thinking about the bills going to the agent: plumbing, drywall, insulation, flooring, electrical, appraisal, mortgage application and not to forget the Home Inspection fee.

    You could start an entirely new reality show concept.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Osceola, AR
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    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Alton,

    A little strange that the appraiser was there since the inspection is typically a contract contingency to be removed by the client. I hope that the client will leverage the mortgage application fee, appraisal fee and Home Inspection fee back against the agent who destroyed the house that they would have bought if it weren't for the actions of the agent. Do hope that the client takes that direction. Would love love to be there to hear that agent sequel.
    It is pretty common for the appraiser to be there at the same time that I am, on foreclosure sales anyway. Most of the agencies that handle the foreclosures are over an hour or more away and most try to set all the inspections and appraisals at the same time so they only make one trip.

    It just amazed me (and I really have gotten quite hard to amaze, as I said this was a fairly typical inspection) that the appraiser would demand a copy of my inspection report and would threaten to delay the mortgage application until he received a copy.

    I told the buyer that I didn't feel that it was in her best interest to turn over the report, but that the decision was up to her. The agent also advised that she not release a copy to the appraiser as it could possibly allow the mortgage company to demand that every item be repaired within a certain time period.

    I just got off the phone with the appraiser who now tells me that he cannot complete his appraisal without a copy of the inspection report and that he will be filing a complaint with the Arkansas Home Inspectors Registration Board because I refused to cooperate with him on this transaction. Another typical inspection day...

    On a brighter note, this mornings inspection went great. Utilities were all on, home had been dewinterized, the agent brought coffee, and the home was actually in decent condition. This afternoons booking isn't looking quite as rosy, but hey if it was easy they wouldn't call it work, and they certainly wouldn't allow me to do it...

    Last edited by Alton Darty; 03-18-2013 at 10:58 AM. Reason: oopsie
    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Maryland
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    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Alton,
    Always find the processes in the different states interesting. Especially the ones involving foreclosures.

    The appraisers demands and threats on you are a hoot. Especially since you are, by contract, prohibited from giving it to him. He has no grounds for a complaint, but your client would have a valid complaint to the lic board if you gave it to him.

    Still wondering about the damage by the agent and who is paying for it.

    Do you think you could create a cartoon strip of that inspection? You might be the next Schultz.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Alton - Unless there is some strange law in Arizona, I'd tell the appraiser where he could stick his demands and complaints. I tell my clients to never let the report get into the hands of the appraiser unless they have no alternative.

    I had an inspection that was blown by the bank. The buyer had worked out everything with the seller. The seller would have a broken roof truss evaluated by a structural engineer and repair it. The buyer would take care of the other repairs listed in my report.

    The buyer let the seller have a copy of the report. Then the FHA appraiser came by, the seller showed the report to the appraiser who then copied every repair in my report, no matter how small, except for one thing, the field patched roof truss. I guess it would look funny if that was included since he didn't normally look in attics and at trusses.

    The bank blew the sale by demanding that all the listed repairs that the appraiser had reported be completed and who had to do the repairs and they had to be certified by a code inspector before financing could be approved.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring City/Surrounding Philadelphia area
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Ha ha ha!!! This is priceless. I love seeing people making their own rules and having it all blow up in their face.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Osceola, AR
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Garry, if I could draw worth a hoot I would probably try it. This was an amusing day to say the least. I am seriously considering getting one of the wearable video cams, I think I could edit a great video or two from some of the things that I see or hear at inspections. Plus it could serve as proof of statement & actions.

    The appraiser does not worry me. I faxed him an enlarged copy of my HI license, along with the phone numbers and website of the Registration Board, the name of the Administrator and the mailing address of the Registration Board. It still amazes me though, this guy has literally been appraising in Arkansas for some 50 odd years and he thinks that he can demand a copy of the inspection report? I tried to get the buyer to file a charge on the appraiser since he attempted to coerce her into providing a copy of the inspection report by saying he would delay the mortgage application process. The buyer however just wants to move on.

    The sellers agent has since refunded the buyer the appraisal fee, the fee paid for dewinterization that was not properly done, and my inspection fee plus deposits, earnest money and so forth. No word on the amount of damages to the home, I would think it is probably going to be in excess of $2k when that part is complete. Fee to replace elements in three water heaters alone will probably be $200-$500.

    Meanwhile the buyer from this inspection has called today with news of an offer on another home, waiting for an approved contract and then we schedule another round.

    Today has been a pretty good day, this mornings residential inspection went well, this afternoons commercial inspection at a small strip mall was an experience but that's a story for another day.
    Convenience store/hair salon/beauty supply/dining area in one suite.
    Psychic/medium in the next unit.
    Third unit? Real Estate agency! Complete with some of my all time favorite agents from past inspections! Yea me! You just can't make this stuff up...

    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Alton,
    Sounds like the appraiser is use to bluffing the reports out of HIs.
    Looked at your state law and it seems that the only one that can make you give up a report is the state lic board.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Osceola, AR
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Typical Inspection day

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Alton,
    Sounds like the appraiser is use to bluffing the reports out of HIs.
    Looked at your state law and it seems that the only one that can make you give up a report is the state lic board.

    Exactly. Arkansas law limits the report to the client and those named by the client to receive a copy. My inspection agreement allows for one digital copy and one printed copy to be delivered to the client. My inspection agreement also requires the client receive written permission from me to distribute a report to any other than the clients agent. I will often cc the buyers agent a copy of the report if requested by the client, the whole inspection report, and not just the summary page. Most agents only want the summary so now for the most part they just get a copy of the summary from the client.
    I have heard the stories of mortgage companies who have gotten hold of reports before and required every single item be repaired, often within 45-60 after closing. Now I advise buyers to keep the report themselves, their agent, and to the buyers attorney if things get sticky backing out of the contract on the inspection contingency.

    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

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