Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Beverly Hammond's Avatar
    Beverly Hammond Guest

    Default Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    Hi, I am Beverly Hammond. My husband and father were both inspectors, so I have learned quite a bit via osmosis, reading reports, correcting reports, and a personal interest in the field. Quality control in many industries holds a special interest for me. However, we have a personal interest in the sheetrock situation because our home flooded in Hurricane Ike. We are running behind many others in reconstruction due to insurance problems, and because we refused to be scammed by out of state contractors (Note: not all contractors are bad, but Texas does not have licensing for contractors, except plumbers and electricians - not a good situation). My husband just did one room with sheetrock from Lowe's and he suddenly breaks out in a strange rash, BAD headaches, and other symptoms. I was initially relieved since the sheetrock is made in the US, and then tonight CBS says that the Florida studies show that US manufacturers are also implicated. I took a look at the "new" sheetrock and it has a decidedly yellowish tint, compared to the sheetrock from 1979, when the house was built. So, fortunately, we have only finished one room. It looks like we may have to start over, but with WHAT? If manufacturers are injecting carcinogenic and toxic crap into sheetrock, then what would stop them from doing the same to concrete board? Or wood? Any suggestions? It is disgusting to think that we may have to test almost every item that we plan to install. If you are a tester of sheetrock or concrete board, please contact me with your specs and prices. I am also interested in radiation testing. Thanks. We also want to know how to assure a fireplace (metal) that went thrugh the flood can be certified to be safe to use in the future, or is there a rust problem or other problem that could cause a fire, if the fireplace is used in the future? The flood water was full of all kinds of toxic stuff, not just sewage. We live close to the Port of Houston and Galveston Bay. Suggestions? Thanks in advance.

    Similar Threads:
    2018 ASHI InspectionWorld

  2. #2
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    Beverly,

    First, welcome.

    Second, your question will evetually be found by the people with the answers you are looking for, but if you repost (copy and paste) in the Building Interior section of this site you will get a much quicker response.

    There is also a Fireplace and Chimney section if you want to seperate the two questions you have.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    You need to be careful with folks who are preying on homeowners with drywall problems, they are coming out of the woodwork like cockroaches!

    You can take a sample drywall to just about any good lab in your area and they can tell you what you have with that sample. As for radon testing(I assume this is what you are talking about) You would want a long term test for your home. This type of test runs for 91+ days in the home. You can order a test kit off the Internet, you would want to get what is called an alpha track test. At the end of 91 days you pack it up and send it to the lab and you will have the results in about a week. Your area is not know to have radon problems.

    Last edited by Scott Patterson; 11-30-2009 at 12:36 PM.
    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
    Robert Autrey's Avatar
    Robert Autrey Guest

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverly Hammond View Post
    I am also interested in radiation testing.

    If you meant radon testing this might interest you.

    Attached Files Attached Files

  5. #5
    EDWARD MARTIN's Avatar
    EDWARD MARTIN Guest

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    Hi Beverly,
    This is also my first reply on this forum after following it for many years.
    Hope your problem is not as serious as it sounds.Maybe some of the truly knowledgable members like Aaron in Dallas or the boys in Florida can help you.


  6. #6
    Mitchell Toelle's Avatar
    Mitchell Toelle Guest

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    Just a thought Beverely, but you folks had to do some demolition along with your work...and most likely replaced the wall insulation before putting up new drywall. It may be premature to think that the drywall is the cause of the physical symptoms experienced.

    Exposure to the material that you said was damaged by toxic water/ flooding may also have been a cause. Exposure to some insulation materials can also be irritating to some people. These should all be considerations. Hope you find your answers.


  7. #7
    James DeLaPlaine's Avatar
    James DeLaPlaine Guest

    Default Re: Hi from Texas special interest in toxic materials

    EMSL Analytical, Inc. is a testing lab with an office in Houston south of 290 just outside Loop 610. I received some literature from them on the testing they perform to identify Chinese Drywall. Their corporate number is 800-220-3675, and their Material Science Division is at extension 1247. We are consulting engineers and reserached the Chinese Drywall issue for some of our big General Contractor clients in case they had reports of problems. So far no problems have been reported, so my experience is limited to what I have read.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverly Hammond View Post
    Hi, I am Beverly Hammond. My husband and father were both inspectors, so I have learned quite a bit via osmosis, reading reports, correcting reports, and a personal interest in the field. Quality control in many industries holds a special interest for me. However, we have a personal interest in the sheetrock situation because our home flooded in Hurricane Ike. We are running behind many others in reconstruction due to insurance problems, and because we refused to be scammed by out of state contractors (Note: not all contractors are bad, but Texas does not have licensing for contractors, except plumbers and electricians - not a good situation). My husband just did one room with sheetrock from Lowe's and he suddenly breaks out in a strange rash, BAD headaches, and other symptoms. I was initially relieved since the sheetrock is made in the US, and then tonight CBS says that the Florida studies show that US manufacturers are also implicated. I took a look at the "new" sheetrock and it has a decidedly yellowish tint, compared to the sheetrock from 1979, when the house was built. So, fortunately, we have only finished one room. It looks like we may have to start over, but with WHAT? If manufacturers are injecting carcinogenic and toxic crap into sheetrock, then what would stop them from doing the same to concrete board? Or wood? Any suggestions? It is disgusting to think that we may have to test almost every item that we plan to install. If you are a tester of sheetrock or concrete board, please contact me with your specs and prices. I am also interested in radiation testing. Thanks. We also want to know how to assure a fireplace (metal) that went thrugh the flood can be certified to be safe to use in the future, or is there a rust problem or other problem that could cause a fire, if the fireplace is used in the future? The flood water was full of all kinds of toxic stuff, not just sewage. We live close to the Port of Houston and Galveston Bay. Suggestions? Thanks in advance.



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •