Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Michael Martinez's Avatar
    Michael Martinez Guest

    Default Excess Water Pressure

    Is it common to note that a pressure regulator should be installed when the water pressure exceeds 80PSI?

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,049

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Martinez View Post
    Is it common to note that a pressure regulator should be installed when the water pressure exceeds 80PSI?
    I do. Just for the sake of wondering, at what location and how did you test the pressure? What was the reading?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Last week I test one at 130 psig

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  4. #4
    Michael Martinez's Avatar
    Michael Martinez Guest

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Quote Originally Posted by John Dirks Jr View Post
    I do. Just for the sake of wondering, at what location and how did you test the pressure? What was the reading?
    I checked pressure at 2 hose bibs and laundry faucets and got a reading of 110 PSI at all locations. Water heater had showed signs of a leak and had moderate corrosion on the supply pipe. I told her that anything over 80 PSI the UPC recommends a regulator.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Welcome.

    (hint, topic areas by subject).


    Not necessarily, need to determine the cause. Note you did not indicate if a private supply system or municipal or shared system supply.

    Determination of the cause, should your readings be accurate (may not be), and recommendations to reduce and moderate at safer levels target 70 psi or below. Determine if boosting/elevation equipment is present and malfunctioning, incoming pressures, etc. could be a host of situations contributing.

    Was the home occupied, or unoccupied (WH not set to vacation mode or set back extremely low)? Excessive H gas can build up in system.

    Expansion can backup to cold system, excessive pressures can result esp. if home is a closed system (checked from main/muni supply).

    Screening clogged upstream?

    Expansion tank present? If so, waterlogged?

    Differeing types of PRVs, may not be necessary - determining pressures at supply. System may be closed and in need of expansion relief - pressures can build up in short time periods when periods of non-use and storage type WH left operating.

    Temperature and pressures at the WH.

    Conditions you describe at WH ambiguous but suggestive WH equipment in need of replacement or repair and further exploration and evaluation of system required by plumber.

    A runaway WH or one left in full operation mode in unused occupancy esp with a scaled TPRV can cause the conditions you describe.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-24-2011 at 08:27 AM.

  6. #6
    Michael Martinez's Avatar
    Michael Martinez Guest

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    Welcome.

    (hint, topic areas by subject).


    Not necessarily, need to determine the cause. Note you did not indicate if a private supply system or municipal or shared system supply.

    Determination of the cause, should your readings be accurate (may not be), and recommendations to reduce and moderate at safer levels target 70 psi or below. Determine if boosting/elevation equipment is present and malfunctioning, incoming pressures, etc. could be a host of situations contributing.

    Was the home occupied, or unoccupied (WH not set to vacation mode or set back extremely low)? Excessive H gas can build up in system.

    Expansion can backup to cold system, excessive pressures can result esp. if home is a closed system (checked from main/muni supply).

    Screening clogged upstream?

    Expansion tank present? If so, waterlogged?

    Differeing types of PRVs, may not be necessary - determining pressures at supply. System may be closed and in need of expansion relief - pressures can build up in short time periods when periods of non-use and storage type WH left operating.

    Temperature and pressures at the WH.

    Conditions you describe at WH ambiguous but suggestive WH equipment in need of replacement or repair and further exploration and evaluation of system required by plumber.

    A runaway WH or one left in full operation mode in unused occupancy esp with a scaled TPRV can cause the conditions you describe.
    The home is occupied, the water heater was a State Select 40g nat gas operating at normal range. The supply is municipal.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Martinez View Post
    The home is occupied, the water heater was a State Select 40g nat gas operating at normal range. The supply is municipal.
    How was "operating at normal range" determined? or rather, just what do "you" mean by this statement?

    Do you mean the "setting" visualized and the temperature determined at a faucet?

    Altitude at installation? properly derated if applicable? Determined pressure at WH? (at drain port of same)? Determined if TPRV was discharging or properly funcioning? Expansion tank present? Cold inlet pipe hot, warm or cold? (retorical questions). You noted corrosion and leaking - referral and inquiry to municipality regarding running pressures at municipal main branch - unless you are a licensed plumber would not be DESIGNING CORRECTIONS for a CONDITION you observed but are not qualified or authorized to fully investigate and evaluate and *could be* (your readings) inaccurate.

    Yes the household system should be operated at pressures below 80 psi, note why and note your observations and recommend referal for further investagation, evaulation and remediation to a licensed qualified professional. Do NOT take it upon yourself to DESIGN a correction unless you are a licensed professional qualified to engage in the practice of plumbing or engineering of same.

    Point being, there are a host of things which could be causal regarding readings (should your readings be accurate) which a pressure regulator at the main should it be bypass or not, would not necessarily protect or correct the conditions you observed, for example no exapnsion relief, pressures backing up into cold, etc. It very well could be a closed system, intentional or not, a combination of contributing factors may be present, and you do not know the operating pressures of the supply system.

    Report observations, explain why same are a concern, and refer for further examination, evaluation, and remediation of the negative conditions suggested by your observations.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-24-2011 at 08:54 AM.

  8. #8
    Michael Martinez's Avatar
    Michael Martinez Guest

    Default Re: Excess Water Pressure

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    How was "operating at normal range" determined? or rather, just what do "you" mean by this statement?

    Do you mean the "setting" visualized and the temperature determined at a faucet?

    Altitude at installation? properly derated if applicable? Determined pressure at WH? (at drain port of same)? Determined if TPRV was discharging or properly funcioning? Expansion tank present? Cold inlet pipe hot, warm or cold? (retorical questions). You noted corrosion and leaking - referral and inquiry to municipality regarding running pressures at municipal main branch - unless you are a licensed plumber would not be DESIGNING CORRECTIONS for a CONDITION you observed but are not qualified or authorized to fully investigate and evaluate and *could be* (your readings) inaccurate.


    Yes the household system should be operated at pressures below 80 psi, note why and note your observations and recommend referal for further investagation, evaulation and remediation to a licensed qualified professional. Do NOT take it upon yourself to DESIGN a correction unless you are a licensed professional qualified to engage in the practice of plumbing or engineering of same.
    Thank you so much for your advice/input Mr. Watson. It is greatly appreciated and will help me in the future how I recommend repairs or further evaluation by a qualified professional. Hope you have a great weekend!


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •