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  1. #1
    carl cox's Avatar
    carl cox Guest

    Default General Building Contractor

    Good Morning..
    I'm wondering if anyone has had experience with the potential structural compromising of water saturated TJI floor joists. I've been contracted to repair/restore a home, in which, a water line failed, and has been flowing for approxiately 20 days. The water saturated the 1'1/8 ply sub floor, being supported by TJI slient floor joists. The area is being dried with mold remediation in progress. The insurance adjuster doesnt see a problem with the floor joists, but I am concerned about potential delamination. Any thoughts? thanks...Carl

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: General Building Contractor

    TJI is pretty helpful, so you can probably call them and they'll have some information. When I was framing, we had several scrap pieces that we used as walkways to keep us out of the mud, and they seemed fine after being out in the rain and snow for months. It seems like pretty tough stuff to me.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  3. #3
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    Default Re: General Building Contractor

    Contact the manufacturer, see if they think it's OK or not.
    Chances are, not.
    Once you have it in writing from the manufacturer it will be difficult for the insurance company to dispute.
    If the manufacturer does say it's OK (very unlikely), then you should not have a problem anyhow.
    I would send photos, description of what happened, and moisture readings of the joist, and plywood.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

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    Default Re: General Building Contractor

    I agree TJI hold up pretty well, but I would get it from manufacture in writing before I would bite the bullet for the future. In the world of CYA I would replace them. Pretty sure even if a manufacture would say they are OK to use there would be wording releasing them from liability putting it on your shoulders.

    I definitely would not go with "... The insurance adjuster doesnt see a problem with the floor joists,...." as a statement of any value.

    Using a SE to cover you for not replacing them may be another answer.


  5. #5
    Greg Kelly's Avatar
    Greg Kelly Guest

    Default Re: General Building Contractor

    Good morning Carl,
    The materials and in particular the adhesives used in the construction of the trusses are designed to be water resistant for the reason that most will be subjected to weather during construction. If mold remediation has taken place then the trusses have been allowed to dry out. If you don't visually see any de-lamination or feel any punky areas then I wouldn't expect any further damage to the trusses from the flood.
    Greg


  6. #6
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    Default Re: General Building Contractor

    Quote Originally Posted by carl cox View Post
    Good Morning..
    I'm wondering if anyone has had experience with the potential structural compromising of water saturated TJI floor joists. I've been contracted to repair/restore a home, in which, a water line failed, and has been flowing for approxiately 20 days. The water saturated the 1'1/8 ply sub floor, being supported by TJI slient floor joists. The area is being dried with mold remediation in progress. The insurance adjuster doesnt see a problem with the floor joists, but I am concerned about potential delamination. Any thoughts? thanks...Carl
    Yep. Entire structure ended up in total failure, condemned and razed, followed by 5 years of multiple party litigation (banks, insurers, property owner, an architect, independant adjuster, two engineers, three subs, the restoration contractor (company)'s insurance company cross complaining against the GC; the GC restoration contractor, personally, ended up with the bill. Last I heard he was suing his personal attorneys (hired and fired several firms throughout for personal representation) for malpractice, and still hadn't paid out a dime.

    The conditions and exposure you describe would likely void the limited lifetime transferable warranty from "W" for delamination, strand or component separation, inadequacy of design values (as published) or manufacturing defect covered by the warranty relevant to the CCMC code, Identification stamps and date stamp upon same.

    The company can be easily contacted and supplied with photographs of the stamps, report of the circumstances and conditions, and requested or invited to visit site to confirm the status (void) of the warranty and precise plans/instructions how to remediate the system. When the ineligible (disclaimed) status is declared, there can be no further argument as to the need to replace (restore the insured to conditions/value prior to loss event - i.e. structural performance of the joists, transferable lifetime of structure), just when, why, and who will have to pay for it.

    Note I said "when" not "if" in the sentance immediately preceeding. Maintaining dry conditions really means maintaining dry conditions.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 04-11-2012 at 02:27 PM.

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