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Thread: Barbara from NM

  1. #1
    Barbara Weskot's Avatar
    Barbara Weskot Guest

    Default Barbara from NM

    Hi All,
    I am a Home Inspection student and I have a few questions I hope someone will take the time to answer for me, thanks in advance.

    1. If you have a connection to a public water pipe where does the jumping wire across the water meter connect?

    If a refrigerator and freezer are both pluged into a GFCI . Do they need to be changed to a regular outlet?

    If you take the time to reply again my thanks.

    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Columbus GA
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    Default Re: Barbara from NM

    Quote Originally Posted by Barbara Weskot View Post
    Hi All,
    I am a Home Inspection student and I have a few questions I hope someone will take the time to answer for me, thanks in advance.

    1. If you have a connection to a public water pipe where does the jumping wire across the water meter connect?

    If a refrigerator and freezer are both pluged into a GFCI . Do they need to be changed to a regular outlet?

    If you take the time to reply again my thanks.
    1) Before and after the meter (if needed).

    You did not have a #2 so I included it for the second question
    2) No. The outlet should not be changed to a non GFCI

    Since you are a student, I recommend you read the current thread on garage door openers. This is a good discussion.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Western Maryland
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    Default Re: Barbara from NM

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    1) Before and after the meter (if needed).

    You did not have a #2 so I included it for the second question
    2) No. The outlet should not be changed to a non GFCI

    Since you are a student, I recommend you read the current thread on garage door openers. This is a good discussion.
    I would never plug a fridge or freezer into a GFCI outlet (because of the risk of accidental tripping), and if that was all that was within reach, I would install (or switch to) a non-protected outlet. If the outlet in question must remain protected due to its location, find another one to use.

    The location of the outlet (near a wet location, basement, garage, exterior) determines whether it needs to be GFCI protected or not. The appliance in use does not.

    And, regarding jumpers: yes on both sides of the water meter, but if this is the main system ground, make sure that there are no plastic water lines, shut-offs, etc., anywhere in between the connection from the panel to the meter. But also look to see if there are any ground rods outside (usually near the meter) that may have been installed at some point that may have superseded the (probably original) water line ground. (I see mostly old houses that have multiple generations/upgrades in place).

    Mark Fisher
    Allegany Inspection Service - Cumberland MD 21502 - 301-722-2224
    Home Inspections, Mold Testing, Thermal Imaging

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Columbus GA
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    Default Re: Barbara from NM

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    I would never plug a fridge or freezer into a GFCI outlet (because of the risk of accidental tripping), and if that was all that was within reach, I would install (or switch to) a non-protected outlet. If the outlet in question must remain protected due to its location, find another one to use.

    The location of the outlet (near a wet location, basement, garage, exterior) determines whether it needs to be GFCI protected or not. The appliance in use does not.
    Hello Mark
    The OP states she is a student of home inspection.
    I suspect she has question about a test she has taken or is studying for.
    I believe the correct answer for the test would be , "No, they do not need to be changed to a regular (non GFCI) outlet".

    Why is there no need?
    GFCI's are approved for use with all appliances.
    All appliances are approved for use with GFCI protection.
    Thus, no need.

    Your fear of "accidental tripping" is not a need, and is not supported by facts.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Western Maryland
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Barbara from NM

    Hmmm... Well, supported by experience, then. Had a house (not an inspection) that had a GFCI outlet in the bathroom protecting circuits downstream in the kitchen. The outlet got bumped and the test button tripped it and it went unnoticed till much later when, coming home, they found the fridge off. Again, I deal with predominately older houses; I frequently check outlets in kitchens or baths (with the push-button tester) to see if it's protected, even if there is no visible GFI outlet, then have to hunt for what tripped (if it trips, of course).

    So, not a 'need', perhaps, but I would consider it a recommendation, or a 'should', to keep a fridge off of a GFCI protected circuit. Just like I would if I knew home medical equipment (monitors, O2) were on one. JMHO.

    Mark

    Mark Fisher
    Allegany Inspection Service - Cumberland MD 21502 - 301-722-2224
    Home Inspections, Mold Testing, Thermal Imaging

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