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  1. #1
    Paul Bukeavich's Avatar
    Paul Bukeavich Guest

    Default Inspecting older moble homes.

    I was on the phone the other day with a potential client who wants a 30 yr old doublewide inspected. she has concerns about flooring, and just general concerns about the stability of the whole structure. She wondered how I was going to inspect the underside(which still has the vapor barrier attached) and make sure it was all "ok". I suggested to have the vapor barrier removed for inspection, then re-attach after. I'm just looking for some insight about 30yr old moble home, and if there are any areas that may require more attention.

    Thanks, Paul

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Bukeavich View Post
    I was on the phone the other day with a potential client who wants a 30 yr old doublewide inspected. she has concerns about flooring, and just general concerns about the stability of the whole structure. She wondered how I was going to inspect the underside(which still has the vapor barrier attached) and make sure it was all "ok". I suggested to have the vapor barrier removed for inspection, then re-attach after. I'm just looking for some insight about 30yr old moble home, and if there are any areas that may require more attention.

    Thanks, Paul
    If memory serves me, a manufactured home has a life expectancy of only 25 years!

    The barrier on the bottom of the twice wide is around 30 mil plastic ABS sheeting. All of the ones I have seen had holes in them after a few years.

    Sounds like this twice wide is a candidate for someones deer camp!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Ainna-goinna happen....

    No way is the homeowner (not the buyer-- yet) going to let you take the vB and the insulation off the bottom without the buyer being responsible for putting them back in place. There is absolutely no way to check it without taking ALL of the insulation and VB off. Otherwise you are only doing a sampling-- what good is that?

    Now, the fact is you were only going to be donig a sampling of the crawlspace anyway... No one looks at every inch of every sub-floor in the crawl. You would be under there for-ever!

    Let them know that takes place and what to expect. Expectations of the buyers should not be more that a sampling anyway. Let them know that's all you can do and you will be glad to do that, if the sellers first remove sections that can be accessed for a visual inspection, without you or them (the buyers) being responsible for replacement of those areas.

    As Scotty said, mobile homes are generally considered to have a life expectancy equal to that of a cave-man... 25 years.

    Heres something else you should let them know. That sucker is no longer a *Mobile* home. Try putting that sucker on a the road and see what happens... Ever seen one on the highway that was torn all to sheeIIt... well, there ya go (with this one).

    Rich


  4. #4
    Joseph P. Hagarty's Avatar
    Joseph P. Hagarty Guest

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Inspected this one last week.
    Elderly woman has been renting here for the last 47 years....

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,286

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Mobiles often use particleboard floor sheathing. I often find damage under windows and at exterior corners. Windows with awnings generally do not have a problem. The windows in mobiles relies on caulking instead of flashing. Roofs have minimal overhangs. I probe the interior floors along the exterior walls with a narrow bladed screwdriver for damage.

    Also, watch for aluminum branch wiring and PB piping.

    Mobiles are a bit different from site-built homes. See if you can get educated as to the requirements and differences so you can inspect more thoroughly.

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
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    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    This was a mobile home.

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  7. #7
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Rick,

    Looks like it may become the new covered bridge now.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
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    4,517

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    Jon,

    We could call it "The Bridges of Redneck County".


  9. #9
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Inspecting older moble homes.

    I would have concerns about a 30 year dbl. wide too. The floor will probably be MDF or particle board. Anything that has spilled/leaked/urinated on it in the past 30 years will have caused it to dissinegrate into saw dust. Vapor barrier is most likely gone, as others have said.

    If you do decide to inspect it:

    1. DO NOT remove the vapor barrier if intact. Remember that we are performing an inspection based on what is available to be inspected. Remove any of the vapor barrier and you might as well take out your wallet because you will be replacing it.
    2. I wouldn't go onto the roof, too much risk there. If you break through and damage their perfectly good roof you will be hurting, physically and financially. Inspect it from your ladder.
    3. Disclaim anything that is not visible and able to be inspected. ie. limited roof inspection, underflooring in-accessible, roof cavity is not accessible due to ceilings, etc.
    4. Remember that ther may very well be aluminum wiring.
    5. PB supply piping and ABS drain piping will probably be present.
    6. Place in bold print at the beginning of your report and throughout the systems area of your report that the home is beyond it's life expectancy and anything and everything should be expected to break at any time.
    7. etc.
    8. etc.
    9. etc.


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