Results 1 to 26 of 26
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tampa, Fl
    Posts
    155

    Default Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    I don't think this is allowed, but need verification. Gas line to cooktop. Thanks.

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    NHIE Practice Exam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    You're right. The flex connector shouldn't pass through anything or go into any hidden space.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    "The flex connector shouldn't pass through anything ..."
    Not saying you are wrong
    It does not exactly say "anything"

    2006 IRC
    G2422.1.2.3 (411.1.3.3) Prohibited locations and penetrations.
    Connectors shall not be concealed within, or
    extended through, walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or
    appliance housings.

    So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?

    Last edited by Rick Cantrell; 01-23-2009 at 06:24 AM. Reason: remove bold
    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    "The flex connector shouldn't pass through anything ..."
    Not saying you are wrong
    It does not exactly say "anything"

    2006 IRC
    G2422.1.2.3 (411.1.3.3) Prohibited locations and penetrations.
    Connectors shall not be concealed within, or
    extended through, walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or
    appliance housings.

    So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?
    I think that there is a partition, ain't it?

    CSST is another animal. It can be concealed. What's in the photo is a regular gas connector, not CSST.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring City/Surrounding Philadelphia area
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Looks like a pretty hard bend on that flex line.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    It also looks like it is kinked.

    (Added with edit) Dang, Nick, you must have been clicking 'Submit' when I click 'Post Reply'.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tampa, Fl
    Posts
    155

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    "So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?"

    Good point Rick. Anyone have an answer, anyone? anyone? Bueller?


  8. #8
    R Gann's Avatar
    R Gann Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    As long as cutoff and flex line are accessible it is legal. But that kink??


  9. #9
    Russel Ray's Avatar
    Russel Ray Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Barnicle View Post
    "So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?"

    Good point Rick. Anyone have an answer, anyone? anyone? Bueller?
    One can run it through a hole by terminating it on one side of the hole to a rigid piece that goes through the hole. Then, on the other side of the hole, connect another piece of CSST to the cooktop. The best builders here actually do that. Of course, that means that the labor to build each home is increased by about $100, so that adds about $10,000 to the cost of each home. Obviously, then, the only builders who do this type of work are out where the multi-million-dollar properties are being built.


  10. #10
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Russel Ray View Post
    One can run it through a hole by terminating it on one side of the hole to a rigid piece that goes through the hole. Then, on the other side of the hole, connect another piece of CSST to the cooktop. The best builders here actually do that. Of course, that means that the labor to build each home is increased by about $100, so that adds about $10,000 to the cost of each home. Obviously, then, the only builders who do this type of work are out where the multi-million-dollar properties are being built.
    Russell: Incorrect.

    G2422.1.2.1
    (411.1.3.1) Maximum length. Connectors shall
    have an overall length not to exceed 3 feet (914 mm), except for
    range and domestic clothes dryer connectors, which shall not
    exceed 6 feet (1829 mm) in overall length. Measurement shall
    be made along the centerline of the connector. Only one connector
    shall be used for each appliance.




  11. #11
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    It is accesible both inside the cabinet and under the cooktop itself. Readily accesible, hmmm, what 2 seconds to rip stuff out of the way to get to the shut off. Anyway I see it all the time. It is better to be in the cabinet than behind draws under the cooktop. As far as CSST running thru a hole in the cabinet, a stationary item, no vibration like an HVAC unit, visible on both sides of the hole, accesible, why not. Lets not get to crazy here.

    Now, as far as that kink????

    Russell. As far as

    "One can run it through a hole by terminating it on one side of the hole to a rigid piece that goes through the hole. Then, on the other side of the hole, connect another piece of CSST to the cooktop. The best builders here actually do that."

    I have never seen that done for a cooktop. You must live in rose colored glasses builder perfect heaven


  12. #12
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Barnicle View Post
    I don't think this is allowed, but need verification. Gas line to cooktop. Thanks.
    Matthew: Something else is missing that no one has mentioned this far:

    A sediment trap is required, not a drip or drip leg – the two terms are not synonymous - is required on the gas line of this unit. A drip or drip leg is the container placed at a low point in a system of piping using “wet” gas to collect condensate and from which the condensate is removable. Most gas supplies currently use dry gas thus eliminating the need for drips or drip legs.
    Sediment traps, on the other hand, are required at all gas appliance installation except for gas yard lights, gas clothes dryers, and outdoor grills. In addition to the code requirement, most appliance manufacturers require the installation of a sediment trap (dirt leg) to protect the appliance from debris in the gas. Sediment traps are necessary to protect appliance gas controls from the dirt, soil, pipe chips, pipe joint tapes and compounds and construction site debris that enters the piping during installation and repairs. Hazardous appliance operation could result from debris entering gas controls and burners. Despite the fact that utilities supply clean gas, debris can enter the piping prior to and during installation on the utility side of the system and on the customer side.
    Sediment traps are designed to cause the gas flow to change direction 90 degrees (1.57 rad) at the sediment collection point, thus causing the solid or liquid contaminants to drop out of the gas flow. The nipple and cap must not be placed in the branch opening of a tee fitting because this would not create a change in direction of flow and would allow debris to pass over the collection point. Failure to install this sediment trap will result in invalidation of the unit’s manufacturer’s warranty.
    G2419.4 (408.4) Sediment trap.
    Where a sediment trap is not incorporated as part of the gas utilization equipment, a sediment trap shall be installed downstream of the equipment shutoff valve as close to the inlet of the equipment as practical. The sediment trap shall be either a tee fitting with a capped nipple in the bottom opening of the run of the tee or other device approved as an effective sediment trap. Illuminating appliances, ranges, clothes dryers and outdoor grills need not be so equipped.
    A cooktop is not a "range"



  13. #13
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Standard write up because almost nowhere in TX do they have sediment traps



    "Sediment traps are required at furnaces and water heaters. No sediment traps were found at the appropriate locations. The common practice in this area excludes these items, but all common building codes and manufacturers require the presence to protect automatic equipment for proper operation and safety."

    For areas where the cities are still not inspecting for them. That as well as other aplicable goodies.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    This is why I called it CSST

    2006 IRC
    APPLIANCE CONNECTIONS
    G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances.
    Appliances shall be
    connected to the piping system by one of the following:
    1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installed

    in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.




    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  15. #15
    Russel Ray's Avatar
    Russel Ray Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Russell: Incorrect.

    G2422.1.2.1
    (411.1.3.1) Maximum length. Connectors shall
    have an overall length not to exceed 3 feet (914 mm), except for
    range and domestic clothes dryer connectors, which shall not
    exceed 6 feet (1829 mm) in overall length. Measurement shall
    be made along the centerline of the connector. Only one connector
    shall be used for each appliance.

    Talk to the AHJ's here.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    "Something else is missing that no one has mentioned this far:
    A sediment trap is required,..."



    G2419.4 (408.4) Sediment trap.
    Where a sediment trap is not
    incorporated as part of the gas utilization equipment, a sediment
    trap shall be installed downstream of the equipment shutoff
    valve as close to the inlet of the equipment as practical. The
    sediment trap shall be either a tee fitting with a capped nipple in
    the bottom opening of the run of the tee or other device
    approved as an effective sediment trap. Illuminating appli
    ances, ranges, clothes dryers and outdoor grills need not be so

    equipped.

    I think that would include cooktops.


    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  17. #17
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Russel Ray View Post
    Talk to the AHJ's here.
    Why, if they do not understand English any better than the ones here?


  18. #18
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    This is why I called it CSST


    2006 IRC
    APPLIANCE CONNECTIONS

    G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances.
    Appliances shall be
    connected to the piping system by one of the following:
    1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installed
    in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.




    CSST and flexible appliance connectors are not equal.




  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Just so that I know the difference and don't make the same mistake again, would you post a picture of the CSST the IRC code (G2422.1)is referring to?
    Thank you

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    From the 2006 IRC.

    - G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances. Appliances shall be connected to the piping system by one of the following:
    - - 1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    - - 2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
    - - 3. Listed and labeled appliance connectors in compliance with ANSI Z21.24 and installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions and located entirely in the same room as the appliance.
    - - 4. Listed and labeled quick-disconnect devices used in conjunction with listed and labeled appliance connectors.
    - - 5. Listed and labeled convenience outlets used in conjunction with listed and labeled appliance connectors.
    - - 6. Listed and labeled outdoor appliance connectors in compliance with ANSI Z21.75/CSA 6.27 and installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

    That shown in the photo is a gas connector (see 3. above)

    Regarding using CSST, 2. states "where installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions." and I think that most manufacturers specify gas connectors (back to 3. above).

    Gas connectors are not allowed to go through partitions, and that cabinet side is a "partition".

    (underlining is mine)
    - G2422.1.2.3 (411.1.3.3) Prohibited locations and penetrations. Connectors shall not be concealed within, or extended through, walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or appliance housings.
    - - Exception: Fireplace inserts that are factory equipped with grommets, sleeves or other means of protection in accordance with the listing of the appliance.

    Gas connectors: http://www.dormont.com/dmc/uploadedF...Catalog2MB.pdf (go to last page)


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Jerry
    Every time I try to load the page, IE locks uP. I will try it tomorrow when I get to work
    Thank you

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Here are the front cover and the last page only.

    Attached Files Attached Files
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Jerry
    Thanks for taking the time to answer questions.
    First, let me say that I am not trying to argue this to anyone, or saying that someone is wrong. I'm saying, this is how I think it is. If I am wrong and do not understand, show me what is correct. That is why I'm here.

    First sentence on the second page of the link you provided.

    " FlexTube is corrugated stainless steel tubing"

    My first post was a reply to what John posted

    "The flex connector shouldn't pass through anything ..."
    Not saying you are wrong
    It does not exactly say "anything"

    2006 IRC
    G2422.1.2.3 (411.1.3.3) Prohibited locations and penetrations.
    Connectors shall not be concealed within, or
    extended through, walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or
    appliance housings.

    So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?Not saying you are wrong

    It does not exactly say "anything" "

    The reply was
    "CSST is another animal. It can be concealed. What's in the photo is a regular gas connector, not CSST."

    I then posted

    "This is why I called it CSST

    2006 IRC
    APPLIANCE CONNECTIONS
    G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances.
    Appliances shall be
    connected to the piping system by one of the following:
    1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installed
    in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions."

    I have always called it Flex pipe, but when I read the code it says CSST
    So when I posted CSST it was because the code says CSST

    Maybe it's not CSST, if not, what is the CSST the code is referring to.

    As for Partitions
    Every reference (that I saw) to "Partition" in the IRC
    (except 2; 1 for toilet traps and 1 for electrical panels)
    were talking about walls, load bearing, non load bearing, half walls (my word), ect.
    It (the IRC) just does'nt seem to be talking about a panel in kitchen cabinets.

    So, back to my question.
    So, how could the CSST piping for a drop in cook-top be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?

    I was not asking this to be a smart AXX. I remodel homes, this (the photo) is pretty much how I would have done it. If that is incorrect how should/ could it be done?
    Thank you



    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  24. #24
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    Jerry
    Thanks for taking the time to answer questions.
    First, let me say that I am not trying to argue this to anyone, or saying that someone is wrong. I'm saying, this is how I think it is. If I am wrong and do not understand, show me what is correct. That is why I'm here.

    First sentence on the second page of the link you provided.

    " FlexTube is corrugated stainless steel tubing"

    My first post was a reply to what John posted


    "The flex connector shouldn't pass through anything ..."
    Not saying you are wrong
    It does not exactly say "anything"

    2006 IRC
    G2422.1.2.3 (411.1.3.3) Prohibited locations and penetrations.
    Connectors shall not be concealed within, or
    extended through, walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or
    appliance housings.

    So, how could the CSST piping for a dropin cooktop be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?Not saying you are wrong

    It does not exactly say "anything" "

    The reply was
    "CSST is another animal. It can be concealed. What's in the photo is a regular gas connector, not CSST."

    I then posted

    "This is why I called it CSST

    2006 IRC
    APPLIANCE CONNECTIONS
    G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances.
    Appliances shall be
    connected to the piping system by one of the following:
    1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installed
    in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions."

    I have always called it Flex pipe, but when I read the code it says CSST
    So when I posted CSST it was because the code says CSST

    Maybe it's not CSST, if not, what is the CSST the code is referring to.

    As for Partitions
    Every reference (that I saw) to "Partition" in the IRC
    (except 2; 1 for toilet traps and 1 for electrical panels)
    were talking about walls, load bearing, non load bearing, half walls (my word), ect.
    It (the IRC) just does'nt seem to be talking about a panel in kitchen cabinets.

    So, back to my question.
    So, how could the CSST piping for a drop in cook-top be run, and still be able to get to it, without being run through a hole, or concealed?

    I was not asking this to be a smart AXX. I remodel homes, this (the photo) is pretty much how I would have done it. If that is incorrect how should/ could it be done?
    Thank you


    Rick:

    Not to belabor the point, but CSST and flexible appliance connectors are not the same thing. CSST is designed and intended for use as a gas supply piping. Flexible appliance connectors are designed and intended to connect appliances to the gas supply piping (via a shut-off valve, of course).

    Because CSST is also a flexible material it is allowed as an appliance connector. And as such it is allowed to be installed through partitions and be concealed. That allowance is also made of rigid steel gas piping. It is not allowed for flexible appliance connectors. They are not desinged to be supply piping and cannot be concealed or run through partitions.

    Here is the complete citations from the 2006 IRC and Commentary. Maybe this helps:

    APPLIANCE CONNECTIONS
    G2422.1 (411.1) Connecting appliances. Appliances shall beconnected to the piping system by one of the following:
    1. Rigid metallic pipe and fittings.
    2. Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) where installedin accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
    3. Listed and labeled appliance connectors in compliancewith ANSI Z21.24 and installed in accordance with themanufacturer’s installation instructions and locatedentirely in the same room as the appliance.
    4. Listed and labeled quick-disconnect devices used in conjunctionwith listed and labeled appliance connectors.
    5. Listed and labeled convenience outlets used in conjunctionwith listed and labeled appliance connectors.
    6. Listed and labeled outdoor appliance connectors in compliancewith ANSI Z21.75/CSA 6.27 and installed inaccordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions.[1]Connectors are used to connect the appliance or equipmentto the gas distribution system outlet. The pipe sizingmethods in this chapter size distribution piping up tobut not beyond the appliance shutoff valve outlet andthis section sizes the connection between the shutoffvalve outlet and the appliance [see definition of “Pipingsystem” and Commentary Figure G2422.1(1)]. Thechoice of a connection type must take into considerationsuch factors as appliance movement, vibration,ambient conditions and susceptibility to physical damage.Between the shutoff valve and the appliance, a unionfitting or similar arrangement must allow a means ofdisconnecting the piping. Flared or ground-joint connectionsthat are part of an approved, labeled semirigid(“flexible”) connector can serve as a union [see CommentaryFigures G2422.1(2) and (3)].
    Item 2 addresses CSST connected directly to appliances.Although CSST is allowed to directly connect tospecific appliances (fixed/nonmoveable), CSST is notto be used as a substitute for a connector where one isrequired. CSST manufacturers’ instructions specifywhere CSST can directly connect to appliances andwhere it cannot [see Commentary Figures G2422.1(4)and (5)].
    Item 3 refers to the commonly used, so called “flexible”connectors typically made of corrugated stainlesssteel and previously made of brass. Appliance connectorsare listed and labeled with the label typicallybeing wrapped around the connector tubing.Most appliance connectors manufactured todayhave attached plastic labels that state the installationand sizing instructions. These connectors are not designedfor repeated movement that causes bending ofthe metal and should not be reused after the initial installation.Reuse is typically prohibited by the manufacturers’instructions. Repeated bending and/or vibrationcan cause metal fatigue, stress cracking andgas leakage [see commentary Figures G2422.1(6)and (7)].
    The piping system is sized up to the outlet of the applianceshutoff valve. The connector occurs betweenthe shutoff valve outlet and the appliance and is sizedby the connector manufacturer or is based on the applianceinput rating, gas inlet size and length of theconnector [see Commentary Figure G2422.1(1)]. Forexample, a boiler is supplied by branch piping requiredto be 1 inch (25 mm) based on the sizing methods inSection G2413. The branch piping is 1 inch (25 mm)up to the boiler shutoff valve, but the boiler inlet openingis only ½ inch (13 mm). The piping (connector)downstream of the shutoff valve is sized as a connectorbecause it is 6 feet (1829 mm) or less in length (seecommentary, Section G2420.5).


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    "Not to belabor the point, ..."
    Not at all

    "... CSST and flexible appliance connectors are not the same thing."
    I understand that

    " CSST is designed and intended for use as a gas supply piping."
    I understand that

    " Flexible appliance connectors are designed and intended to connect appliances to the gas supply piping ..."
    I knew that

    "Because CSST is also a flexible material it is allowed as an appliance connector."
    I did not know that

    "Here is the complete citations from the 2006 IRC and Commentary. Maybe this helps:"
    It does.

    So, even though the photo shows a flexible gas connector made of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST), it is not the CSST referenced to in item (2) of G2422.

    Thank you for the explanation

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  26. #26
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Flexible Gas Line and Shutoff in Cabinet

    So, even though the photo shows a flexible gas connector made of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST), it is not the CSST referenced to in item (2) of G2422.
    Rick: If you are referring to the photo in the original post, it depicts a flexible appliance connector. It may well be constructed of stainless steel, but it is still only a flexible appliance connector and not CSST.

    CSST is corrugated stainless steel tubing that is intended to offer an alternative to the traditional threaded black-iron gas piping.

    Flexible appliance connectors, though perhaps similar to CSST is some respects, are not the same and cannot be used in lieu of CSST or black-iron piping.

    It seems that your confusion stems from the fact that they are a bit similar and that they can both be used for appliance connections, but under different installation stipulations.

    Aaron


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •