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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
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    105

    Default Exterior gas lines

    This is a two-part related question: Inspected a 7 year old home today. There is a gas line coming off the meter that goes to an island gas cook top. While the line is supported along the exterior wall in most places, it is suspended above ground just left of meter with no support for about four feet. Despite posing some risks, is this allowed.

    Secondly, there is an exposed portion of flex line going into ground (then beneath slab to cabinet where cook top is installed). Is this type of flex line allowed a.) to be used on exterior) and b.) allowed to be buried??? If allowed, the exposed surface should be sealed, should it not?

    Thanks in advance!

    Greg

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  2. #2
    Brent Simmerman's Avatar
    Brent Simmerman Guest

    Default Re: Exterior gas lines

    Greg,

    this is from my Code Check:

    Ext. pipes above ground min. 3 1/2 in. elevation. 03 IRC 2415.7

    Piping prohibited underground beneath bldg EXC in conduit sealed in bldg & vented on ext. 03 IRC 2415.11

    Hope that helps some.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    4,170

    Default Re: Exterior gas lines

    Greg, this has been discussed here in the past. You might do a search on CSST here for the discussion or check the manufacturer's instructions.
    Gastite, Wardflex are two brands you might use in a search.
    In short, CSST can be buried under certain circumstances.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,245

    Default Re: Exterior gas lines

    Greg,

    How far between the regulator vent and the electrical ignition source to the left - 5 feet is the minimum required clearance.

    The 2006 IRC requires: (bold underlining is mine)
    - G2415.7 (404.7) Above-ground piping outdoors.All piping installed outdoors shall be elevated not less than 3 1/2 inches (152 mm) above ground and where installed across roof surfaces, shall be elevated not less than 3 1/2 inches (152 mm) above the roof surface. Piping installed above ground, outdoors, and installed across the surface of roofs shall be securely supported and located where it will be protected from physical damage. Where passing through an outside wall, the piping shall also be protected against corrosion by coating or wrapping with an inert material. Where piping is encased in a protective pipe sleeve, the annular space between the piping and the sleeve shall be sealed.

    That rigid piping does not meet the above in elevation above ground or in being securely supported and located where it will be protected from physical damage. Additionally, that gas pipe should not be run through the working space in front of the electrical equipment.

    From the 2008 NEC.
    - 110.26 Spaces About Electrical Equipment.
    - - (F) Dedicated Equipment Space. All switchboards, panelboards, distribution boards, and motor control centers shall be located in dedicated spaces and protected from damage.
    - - - Exception: Control equipment that by its very nature or because of other rules of the Code must be adjacent to or within sight of its operating machinery shall be permitted in those locations.
    - - - (1) Indoor (Jerry's note: not applicable here, so I did not copy it here)
    - - - (2) Outdoor. Outdoor electrical equipment shall be installed in suitable enclosures and shall be protected from accidental contact by unauthorized personnel, or by vehicular traffic, or by accidental spillage or leakage from piping systems. The working clearance space shall include the zone described in 110.26(A). No architectural appurtenance or other equipment shall be located in this zone.

    That underground piping is not buried deep enough either.
    - G2415.9 (404.9) Minimum burial depth. Underground piping systems shall be installed a minimum depth of 12 inches (305 mm) below grade, except as provided for in Section G2415.9.1.
    - - G2415.9.1 (404.9.1) Individual outside appliances. Individual lines to outside lights, grills or other appliances shall be installed a minimum of 8 inches (203 mm) below finished grade, provided that such installation is approved and is installed in locations not susceptible to physical damage.

    From the Gastite installation guide:
    - 4.9 Underground Installations
    - - a) CSST shall not be buried directly in the ground or directly embedded in concrete (e.g. slab on grade construction, patio slabs, foundations and walkways). When it is necessary to bury or embed CSST, the tubing shall be routed inside a non-metallic, watertight conduit that has an inside diameter at least 1/2 inch larger than the O.D. of the tubing (Fig. 4-82). For ends of the conduit installed outdoors, the conduit shall be sealed at any exposed end to prevent water from entering.
    - - b) Venting of the conduit has typically been required because the use of conventional materials such as rigid pipe has usually resulted in some form of connection or union within the conduit. Unlike rigid pipe however, CSST is continuous with only one fitting at each end of the run, and no fittings inside the conduit. As a result, the possibility of gas buildup due to fitting leaks has been eliminated. Therefore, Gastite
    ® does not require the sleeving to be vented to the outside of the structure.
    - - - If, however, venting is still required, Figure 4-83 below depicts gas piping installed within plastic sleeving that is vented to the outdoors. Other possible venting routes, such as the attic and roof, may also be considered but must be reviewed with the local administrative authority, and must prevent the entry of water and foreign objects.
    - - - For ends of CSST exiting the plastic sleeving, a termination fitting (XR2TRM-#-NF) threaded into an end “plug”, can be used to provide a stable platform for attachment (Fig. 4-84).


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    105

    Smile Re: Exterior gas lines

    Guys, thanks so much for your replies and the research done. There is enough information given here to pass on to the client to get this corrected. Greatly appreciated!

    Greg


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