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  1. #1
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    Default Dishwasher spliced drain

    Is it allowed to splice a dishwasher drain hose to lengthen it with hose clamps and be in the crawl space?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    Just curious, where is the hose going? Usually they connect to the sink drain.

    Manufacturers instructions may have a max length due to ability of dishwasher to push water and waste up and over a high loop. If the hose goes down hill and is properly connected to a trap, should be OK...maybe, kinda, sorta, ...

    Is it connected to more corrugated pipe or smooth wall pipe. If connected to smooth wall probably OK, but not corrugated any longer than section that came with the dishwasher.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    Hey Bruce good to hear from you, They ran the line down through the floor and brought it back up into the sink cabinet and connected as usual. You can see the black hose addition clamped in the picture next to the sink cabinet duct.

    I just don't like the idea of a clamp pipe in a crawl space where nobody will ever see it. Just like the garbage slinky vinyl dryer ducts that break and dump moisture and lint for years unnoticed.

    Mike Schulz License 393
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    Instead of a high loop, or maybe in addition to the high loop?, that now creates one large trap in that drain line.

    In addition to the concerns Bruce pointed out, I would have concerns regarding that trapped line making the resistance even greater.

    The only code reference would be one which says to install it according to the manufacturer's installation instructions.

    I also don't see a supporting strap for that duct hanging down.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    They ran the line down through the floor and brought it back up into the sink cabinet and connected as usual. You can see the black hose addition clamped in the picture next to the sink cabinet duct.
    In that case, the drain line could freeze, since water will be standing inside. I'd write it up for that reason, if nothing else.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    In NC the water pipes are exposed in the crawl spaces because it "generally" will never freeze under there. Strange though because if it's in a garage or attic they have to be insulated. (both waste & supply)

    Mike Schulz License 393
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Dishwasher spliced drain

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Schulz View Post
    In NC the water pipes are exposed in the crawl spaces because it "generally" will never freeze under there. Strange though because if it's in a garage or attic they have to be insulated. (both waste & supply)
    May be, but ... the IRC REQUIRES *ALL* pluming piping outside the thermal envelope to be protected from freezing ... regardless how seldom is does freeze ... when above the freeze line, which is basically along I-10 across North Florida, to Texas and up to California.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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