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  1. #1
    Stephen Socha's Avatar
    Stephen Socha Guest

    Default Air in well system

    Alright guys, I just put a new tank in, and I still have air in the system. I would guess this is a problem with the well itself. I also put a new switch in for the tank. I just replaced the tank last night, and the switch today. The old tank had a leak in the bladder. I am still getting air, just not as bad. I guess I will have to get ahold of the well company and have them come out. Any other ideas would be appreciated.

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    Last edited by Stephen Socha; 09-08-2010 at 04:42 PM. Reason: change
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  2. #2
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: Air in well system

    As a start I would look at the gauge at the bladder tank to see what it does when water is run. What should happen is that the pump should cut on at 30 pounds and go off at 50 pounds when water is running. (it could be 40/60 pounds depending on the pressure switch setting)

    If the pump comes on every time water is run then the pressure tank is full of water. You can confirm this by cutting off the pump and opening a faucet until the pressure on the gauge is zero. Then take an air guage (like you use on a tire) to check the air charge in the bladder tank. It should be about 30 pounds and mainly it should not be zero pressure. The air chuck may be under a screw on cap in the top of the tank.

    If it is zero pressure with the tank drained then you have a bad bladder tank. You can try to put air back in the tank with an air tank but I doubt it will help as the air will disappear shortly if the tank is bad.


  3. #3
    Stephen Socha's Avatar
    Stephen Socha Guest

    Default Re: Air in well system

    Thanks, will try that gotta figure this out. I have dealt with regular plumbing for most of my life helping my dad fix his pipes and what not but a well is a whole new ball game to me. I am not a contractor just a roughneck who likes to be able to fix things on his own. I will try this when I go off of work in another 5 days. Any other feedback would be greatly appreciated guys! Thanks!


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Default Re: Air in well system

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Socha View Post
    Thanks, will try that gotta figure this out. I have dealt with regular plumbing for most of my life helping my dad fix his pipes and what not but a well is a whole new ball game to me. I am not a contractor just a roughneck who likes to be able to fix things on his own. I will try this when I go off of work in another 5 days. Any other feedback would be greatly appreciated guys! Thanks!
    How deep is the well? Could you be sucking air at the pump, when the level drops in the pipe? That would require a pump guy to see if the pump is too high in the casing. Too low and it could suck sand and die down there. Don't take a chance with your landlord's expensive pump, or you might be buying one.

    Is there lots of water in the well casing and is the flow into the casing fast enough to keep up with the demand? If so, then it could be air leaking in. All the suction is at the bottom, it's pressure pushing out everywhere else, no?

    Sometimes a larger pressure tank will help. It might give you just enough more volume before the pump has to start.

    The pump has a limiting valve that can be closed off to slow the flow to match the flow in from the water table. Don't play with this.
    Get a restricter valve for your shower head, more pressure, less volume.

    A water-logged tank won't squirt air I don't think. It causes fluctuation in the pressure, that's the pump kicking in and shutting off, cycling. Some systems need air pumped in once a year. Cycling will blow electronics, switches etc. and does the pump no good.

    The water heater does not help much. It does hold a reserve of hot water under pressure, but the cold tank the pressure tank supplies the pressure, 50-60 lbs, to push the water through the pipes.

    A submersible pump will cut out if it gets hot, i e, sucks itself dry. It relies on the water to keep it cool. I have no formal training in any of this, so talk to your landlord and get a pump guy to fix it. Then watch what he does.

    Last edited by John Kogel; 06-05-2010 at 10:55 PM.
    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
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    5,005

    Default Re: Air in well system

    Are you sure your well recovery rate has not changed due to water table?

    The fact you have two bladder tanks suggests to me that you may have quantity issues and the tanks are being used for storage.
    What size are these tanks?

    Can't say I've ever seen two pressure tanks used seperately for hot and cold, always in paralell on cold side only.

    Have the well checked for static level and draw down level by experienced well driller or well technician.

    The pump is losing it's prime at the pump level.


  6. #6

    Default Re: Air in well system

    If you have a pitless adaptor on the well, the check valve prevents air from getting into the system. If the check valve is bad, you will get air in the system and it will spew or spit air at the faucet. Have the check valve checked or replaced an you should not have more problems.


  7. #7
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: Air in well system

    I think the OP said it was a submersible pump. That should have a check valve on the top of the pump and maybe at the tank if the one at pump has gone bad. I'll be curious to see what the OP reports when he gets a chance to investigate a bit. I gave him a starting point that uses only the gauge on the tank as a troubleshooting tool. That will help him see what is happening without guessing too much. A amp clamp would be nice to have to if he has one but that's the next step.


  8. #8
    Stephen Socha's Avatar
    Stephen Socha Guest

    Default Re: Air in well system

    Thanks guys, lots of info for me to check into. I got 4 more 12 hr days before I get a chance to mess with it, and then a nice long 14 day break. So hopefully I can get this fixed without too much trouble. I will keep you all posted.


  9. #9
    David Bell's Avatar
    David Bell Guest

    Default Re: Air in well system

    A blockage at the pump intake can cause cavitation.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Stacy, MN
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    145

    Default Re: Air in well system

    The OP said that it happens with the hot water also, unless the home has a tankless water heater there must be something else going on.


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