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  1. #1
    Jon mackay's Avatar
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    Default Air gap for washing machine

    Is an air gap required at the clothes washer standpipe?
    See picture.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    That is wrong.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    A trap is required so waste gases don't enter the home. If you are not sure if there is one. Remove the laundry drain and flush the toilet, then have the broker go over there and sniff


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    Is an air gap required at the clothes washer standpipe?
    No, but an air break is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    That is wrong.
    Quite correct, what is shown is wrong.

    (bold and underlining are mine)
    AIR GAP, DRAINAGE SYSTEM. The unobstructed vertical distance through free atmosphere between the outlet of a waste pipe and the flood-level rim of the fixture or receptor into which it is discharging.

    AIR BREAK (DRAINAGE SYSTEM).An arrangement in which a discharge pipe from a fixture, appliance or device drains indirectly into a receptor below the flood-level rim of the receptor, and above the trap seal.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    "AIR GAP, DRAINAGE SYSTEM. The unobstructed vertical distance through free atmosphere between the outlet of a waste pipe and the flood-level rim of the fixture or receptor into which it is discharging."


    Jerry
    Is something missing?
    I was thinking an air gap was referring to the faucet on tubs and sinks.
    The above only mentions the outlet of a waste pipe.



    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    They make air gaps for washers, for example:



    - VA4 Airgap for washing machine wall box drains - 1/2 CPVC Glue Fitting - FreshWaterSystems.com

    ... but I've yet to see one installed.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    It (the laundry stand pipe) is also insufficient as to size/diameter (DFUs).

    P.S. The hose clamp is serving no purpose at the outlet side of the gooseneck pinned against the wall where gooseneck is improperly connected to undersized laundry stand pipe. It (the hose clamp) should be at the drain hose end securing the washer drain hose TO THE gooseneck.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-02-2010 at 08:41 AM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Air gap for washing machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    "AIR GAP, DRAINAGE SYSTEM. The unobstructed vertical distance through free atmosphere between the outlet of a waste pipe and the flood-level rim of the fixture or receptor into which it is discharging."


    Jerry
    Is something missing?
    I was thinking an air gap was referring to the faucet on tubs and sinks.
    The above only mentions the outlet of a waste pipe.

    Yes, the bolded font for the entire term, and you apparently skipped over the qualifer in the term being defined which JP had modified the font to "unbold" (now "bolded" AND "highlighted" in orange):

    AIR GAP, DRAINAGE SYSTEM.

    i.e. DRAINAGE SYSTEM AIR GAP.

    RC, you're thinking of the potable or supply system "side" air gap, which when "a plumbing system" "air gap" is not further qualified, would include.

    Since the OP is from New York State, and in the STYLE of the NYS Plumbing Code the definitions appear thusly note the difference(s):
    Quote Originally Posted by Plumbing Code, NYS

    AIR BREAK (Drainage System). A piping arrangement in which a drain from a fixture, appliance or device discharges indirectly into another fixture, receptacle or interceptor at a point below the flood level rim and abov the trap seal.

    AIR GAP (Drainage System). The unobstructed vertical distance through the free atmosphere between the outlet of the waste pipe and the flood level rim of the receptacle into which the waste pipe is discharging.

    AIR GAP (Water Distribution System). The unobstructed vertical distance through the free atmosphere between the lowest opening from any pipe or faucet supply water to a tank, plumbing fixture or other device and the flood level rim of the receptacle.


    An example of an older UPC based, code (definitions more all-inclusive and older-language pased) might be found in the Illinois Plumbing Code as thus:
    Quote Originally Posted by Plumbing Code, Illinois

    "Air Break": See Air Gap.

    "Air Gap": The unobstructed vertical distance through the free atmosphere between the lowest opening from any pipe or faucet supplying water to a tank or plumbing fixture and the flood-level rim of the receptacle. An air gap in a drainage system is a piping arrangement in which a drain from a fixture, appliance or device discharges indirectly into another fixture, receptacle, or interceptor at a point above the flood level rim. (See Appendix B: Illustrations A and B.)

    Illustrations A and B are attached below.



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    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-02-2010 at 09:26 AM. Reason: added OP regional references.

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