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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    McKinney Texas
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    Default T&P Drain exit photo

    Take a look at this T%P drain line comign from the slab and then routing upward and then a goose neck down. This house was built in the earl 1990's. Typically see these pointing down, with a 6 inch or so gap on newer homes. With this slab so close to the ground, this configuration seems like the only viable solution to get ground clearance, considering the way the home construction was performed. Was this common in the 1990's and before when T&P's were so close to the ground, without a good amount of clearance?

    Thanks

    Gene

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Chicago IL
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    1,984

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    Great pic, good thing I have good distance vision

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Garland, TX
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    622

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    probably not if in fact it was tp drain
    did you test it per trec?

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,519

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    I've seen what Gene is mentioning before. The T&P drainline termination is less than 6 inches from the ground, so they have placed additional copper on the line to create a uphill run and then elbow it back towards the ground to have that 6 inch clearance.

    Still wrong! Not zero-gravity for drainage.

    Water does not run up hill!

    rick


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Western Massachusetts
    Posts
    536

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Water does not run up hill!
    A University of Oregon researcher has discovered a way to make water run uphill.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    4,170

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    I've seen what Gene is mentioning before. The T&P drainline termination is less than 6 inches from the ground, so they have placed additional copper on the line to create a uphill run and then elbow it back towards the ground to have that 6 inch clearance.

    Still wrong! Not zero-gravity for drainage.

    Water does not run up hill!

    rick
    I've seen this many times with a Tee substituted for the first elbow so that there are two openings, one down which is too close to the ground and another up over and down at the 6 inch level. I guess it is better than nothing or you could say it is wrong on both levels as well as having a tee in the drain line. The only other fix would be to lower the grade enough to get the 6 inch clearance which would then screw up the grading and drainage. For the rest of the world outside of Texas, these are slab foundations.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    I've seen what Gene is mentioning before. The T&P drainline termination is less than 6 inches from the ground, so they have placed additional copper on the line to create a uphill run and then elbow it back towards the ground to have that 6 inch clearance.

    Still wrong! Not zero-gravity for drainage.

    Water does not run up hill!

    rick
    Yeah, but at the same time, it is supposed to be enough pressure and temperature that a 1/2 inch line or a 3/4 PVC line can't handle it. I think that kind of pressure could handle a bit of an uphill run (speaking practically, not code-wise). Theoretically, we're not talking about gravity here.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    4,086

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    What picture? I gots to ask ...

    Where's the "beef"?!?



  9. #9
    Fred Herndon's Avatar
    Fred Herndon Guest

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    I think the concern is that when the valves leak (about every 3rd one) that if the pipe does not drain it will fill up and slowly clog with mineral deposits and bacteria. So, two problems in one.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    Maybe that's it. I don't like to see them run straight up to the roof (which I see occasionally) but I don't make a big deal out of a short uphill run. Maybe I should? Most of the time on older home I'm just happy to see it terminate outside somewhere.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,478

    Default Re: T&P Drain exit photo

    T/P drain line should drain downhill and should not be "trapped". I think it is IRC 2803.6.1

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