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  1. #1
    M Kelekci's Avatar
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    Default How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?
    Thanks,

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  2. #2
    Martin lehman's Avatar
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    I believe the clearance between hot tub and switch of 5 feet.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    Matt and Martin,

    3 x 8 feet is what I use.

    In the Manual of Style for NFPA Technical Committee Documents, Section 3.2.1.2 states, “Spelling and definitions of general words and terms shall follow Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th edition.” Section 3.2.2.3 states, “When a standard definition is needed, Webster's shall be utilized where the meaning is correct and accurate as used in NFPA documents.”

    Section 410.4(D), Bathtub and Shower Areas, addresses luminaires (fixtures) in specific locations. It states that “No parts of cord-connected luminaires (fixtures), hanging luminaires (fixtures), lighting track, pendants, or ceiling-suspended (paddle) fans shall be located within a zone measured 900 mm (3 ft) horizontally and 2.5 m (8 ft) vertically from the top of the bathtub rim or shower stall threshold. This zone is all encompassing and includes the zone directly over the tub or shower stall.”

    Section 406.8(C), Bathtub and Shower Space, addresses receptacles in damp or wet locations. It states, “A receptacle shall not be installed within a bathtub or shower space.” See dimensions above

    Webster's Dictionary defines space as “a limited extent in one, two, or three dimensions.” Working space is perhaps a good example of the use of the word space. Working space is given as a depth, width, and height — three dimensions. Webster's defines zone as, “a region or area set off as distinct from surrounding or adjoining parts.” Hazardous (classified) locations are a good example of the use of the word zone. Zone is used extensively for classifying hazardous locations in distinct areas.

    Knowing this, a reasonable conclusion is that the words space and zone do not have the same meaning. Space is less defined and zone is more defined. However, if we refer to 225.19(E), Zone for Fire Ladders, it would appear that space and zone are one in the same. Section 225.19(E) states in part that, “. . . overhead lines shall be arranged, where practicable, so that a clear space (or zone) at least 1.8 m (6 ft) wide will be left either adjacent to the buildings . . .” In this case, a reasonable conclusion is that space and zone have the same meaning.

    Where does this lead us? Where the word space is used in the Code, it allows for some flexibility and judgment in code enforcement (i.e., receptacles along the floor line of a wall space); it is less stringent. Where the word zone is used in the Code, it does not allow for the same flexibility and judgment in code enforcement (i.e., hazardous (classified) locations); it is more stringent.

    I hope this provides some guidance for a reasonable conclusion. If you would like to debate this issue further, I would suggest throwing the word area into the mix too! — Lanny McMahill, CMP-18 Focus on the Code: CMP-18

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    Last edited by BARRY ADAIR; 07-22-2007 at 04:16 AM.
    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    To my knowledge, there is nothing prohibiting that switch from being there, however, you would want it to have a weatherproof cover when located there.

    Does 'not being prohibited there' mean it is 'safe'? Not to me, so I would write it up as such.

    Barry's reference does not apply (unfortunately).

    Also, ...
    - 406.8 Receptacles in Damp or Wet Locations.
    - - (C) Bathtub and Shower Space. A receptacle shall not be installed within a bathtub or shower space.
    ... only applies to receptacles, NOT switches.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    I guess if they just said "any electrified/energized devices, fixtures and/or appliances" all would be well and everyone would understand electricity and water within the same location are not a good idea.

    The final word will be by the homeowner who will choose to have the switch relocated or not. At least I warned them.

    Are there GFCI switches?

    Maybe in the time it takes to walk through the house in the nude to the panel to reset the GFCI breaker the lightbulb would have come on.

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
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  6. #6
    M Kelekci's Avatar
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    you would want it to have a weatherproof cover when located there.
    .

    How does a weatherproof cover differ from a regular switch cover?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: How close can a switch be to a hydro-therapy equipment?

    Quote Originally Posted by M Kelekci View Post
    How does a weatherproof cover differ from a regular switch cover?
    It is designed to keep most of the water out.

    There are basically two types: 1) a flip cover over the switch which is raised to operate the switch, and which is not weatherproof when the flip cover is raised; 2) plunger or lever operated where the plunger or lever move the switch handle, operating the switch. Both are gasketed to the box/wall, and the flip cover is gasketed to the cover when the flip cover is closed.

    But, the main difference is that all are big ugly things.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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