Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 65 of 83

Thread: TPR Valve reset

  1. #1
    Kevin Prellop's Avatar
    Kevin Prellop Guest

    Default TPR Valve reset

    Does the TPR valve need pressure from the tank to reset? I.E..if the tank is just sitting full of cold water and not operating, should the TPR valve still reset after tripping it, or does it need the pressure to close it completely?

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Prellop View Post
    Does the TPR valve need pressure from the tank to reset? I.E..if the tank is just sitting full of cold water and not operating, should the TPR valve still reset after tripping it, or does it need the pressure to close it completely?
    As a home inspector you should never trip/test a TPR valve. They will almost always leak once tested, sometimes it will stop but most of the time the valve needs to be replaced.

    If you want to test the TPR I recommend twirling the little handle around a few times. If the handle turns easily then the valve is not frozen and it should work. If the handle does not turn or turns with force then the valve is most likely frozen and needs to be replaced.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Does the TPR valve need pressure from the tank to reset? I.E..if the tank is just sitting full of cold water and not operating, should the TPR valve still reset after tripping it, or does it need the pressure to close it completely?
    No, there is no need for the WH to be pressurized for the TPR valve to re-seat.
    If it does not re-seat it needs to be replaced.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    If you want to test the TPR I recommend twirling the little handle around a few times. If the handle turns easily then the valve is not frozen and it should work. If the handle does not turn or turns with force then the valve is most likely frozen and needs to be replaced.
    Wow! If I heard that from someone else I'd say what a load of ........
    Scott, I certainly don't want to question your depth of knowledge (which I have great respect for), but where did you get that one? Have I missed the boat on this method?

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  5. #5
    Kevin Prellop's Avatar
    Kevin Prellop Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I've heard, been trained, and participated with both ways. I usually use common sense on whether to test or not. Obviously, if it is an old WH, I see corrosion, the drain pipe runs through the attic, or if I can't even determine the termination point, then I don't test. I certainly see the consequences of testing them...much like shut-off valves. It just depends.


  6. #6
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I have been trained to NOT operate the TPR valve. And common sense should prevail if you choose to.

    If I hired you to inspect my home, and you chose to open that for a "test" and it didn't seat correctly, I'd expect you to repair it. After all, there wasn't a leak there before you showed up. (a TPR valve is only $30-50, and can be changed with relative ease). In my opinion, it would be the right thing to do unless it specifically states in your pre-inspection agreement that you are testing such device and state the possibility (and high likelyhood) of a leak.

    Before some of you beat me up, I understand the necessity of testing it. I change mine every 2 years when I change my anode rod. I would consider educating the client on the need to have it tested (by a plumber with a new one in hand) at their convenience.

    Just my 2 cents


  7. #7
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Put the brakes on ... inspectors who are not inspecting in TEXAS!

    The TREC SOP, that we are required to follow as part of maintaining our license states that we are "required" to operate/test the TPRV on water heaters.

    There are exceptions that an inspector is allowed to follow to "not" test the TPRV, but he/she had best be extremely sure of them as TREC can levy fines against the HI for not doing what the SOP demands.

    Now ...Kevin ... (I note by your license that you are a newer inspector and still building on your experience) ... your OP noted a W/H with 'cold water' and not operating ... that tells me you have other problems with the appliance that you should be noting in the report.

    Back to testing the TPRV ... like the majority of HIs around the country I agree that testing such is likely not the wisest decision ... but when you have a mandated SOP to follow your options are not the best.

    Now ... you can also review the manufacturer's documentation from Cash Acme and WATS about the TPRVs they make/sell. They state that "homeowners" are required to 'test' them annually and they go further to recommend that a licensed plumber should evaluate/review the TPRV for possible replacement once every three years.

    My reports comment on what the manufacturer 'recommends' and I leave it at that.

    We all know that each of us test the TPRVs on our W/H's in our homes annually ... ... and that we have our local friendly plumber out once very three years ...

    Last edited by Nolan Kienitz; 08-11-2011 at 01:58 PM.

  8. #8
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I forgot about Texas. You boys play by some weird rules!


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I would say if you are doing a plumbing inspection, you should test the T&P valve. Watts states it should be tested yearly to ensure proper operation. So if the home owner has not been testing it yearly and you come along and test it and it keeps leaking, it is not your responsibility to replace it, it is the home owners since this is an item that needs to be tested and replaced as needed. Here is a snap shot from Watts Spec sheet. Here is the link for those of you that like to read and print up the documents. http://media.wattswater.com/ES-10L-100XL.pdf

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,340

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hasil View Post
    I would say if you are doing a plumbing inspection, you should test the T&P valve. Watts states it should be tested yearly to ensure proper operation. So if the home owner has not been testing it yearly and you come along and test it and it keeps leaking, it is not your responsibility to replace it,

    How about the resulting water damage if the valve's outlet is plumbed to an interior location?

    Since the inspector, as a trained professional, could reasonably believe that a failed valve could cause property damage, he shouldn't operate it without the owners permission after disclosing the risk (unless your State requires you to do so).

    Dom.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    As the watts page states if the valve fails turn off the water heater, meaning urn off the water and gas, or electricity to the heater. Tell the home owner that the T&P valve failed and needs replacing. Here in Illinois all our water heater T&P valve piping is piped in the interior of the building.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    As a home inspector you should never trip/test a TPR valve. They will almost always leak once tested, sometimes it will stop but most of the time the valve needs to be replaced.
    I have the opposite opinion of Scott: As a home inspector you should always trip/test a T&P relief valve. For the reason Scott gave for not testing them.

    The key to successful testing of the T&P relief valve is to understand what you are feeling and to NOT force the T&P valve open, but to open if it opens easily. This can be done by testing your own T&P valve (you DO test it regularly, right?) and you will be able to feel when the valve is stuck (you replaced yours when it was stuck, right?). After that, if it does not fully reset, you write the T&P relief valve up as being in need of replacement, and if the T&P relief valve is stuck (and you did not force it open, naturally) you write that up as the T&P relief valve is stuck, and that it is a safety valve and safety valves MUST WORK EVERY TIME, and that 'unsticking' the valve is not what is needed, the valve needs to be 'replaced'.


    If you want to test the TPR I recommend twirling the little handle around a few times. If the handle turns easily then the valve is not frozen and it should work. If the handle does not turn or turns with force then the valve is most likely frozen and needs to be replaced.
    That handle typically just rotates inside the seal, spinning the handle around does not indicate the seal is not stuck. If the handle does not spin around, it is so stuck that the shaft which lifts the seal is also stuck.

    Once you start testing T&P valves you will likely find that any valve older than a few years old is stuck and needs to be replaced.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  13. #13
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    To be honest, I've never given them much thought other than if the piping and valve placement was correct. And after reading all of this, I still won't! But, I think I will start educating customer's a little on their operation, and let them decide whether to test them or not, or just call a plumber. For me, just too much risk, and in this sue happy time we live in, I just don't feel that a $30 TPR valve is worth it.

    For what it's worth, I usually write up all water heaters as possibly needing replaced within 5 years anyway unless I know they are brand new (less than 2 years old). This has been a very good post. Pretty informative, and definitely got me thinking.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale Fl
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Any inspector that does not test the TPRV is doing his client a disservice unless of course his client is a home sale person.
    Since doing home inspection many would not seat and was written as tprv needs replacing. Not a single call from the seller or a lawyer.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Suelter View Post
    ...a TPR valve is only $30-50...
    Hey Joe, want to buy some tpr valves, I will sell you all you want for $30 each!


  16. #16
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    It's no disservice, it's common sense. I am not required to test it. And from here on out, I am leaving it up to the client as to whether I test it, knowing full well it probably will leak, and I am thinking seriously about having a separate "waiver" signed by the property owner should damage incur.

    Let's use an example...I'd like to hear some thoughts. (Not Texas..sorry!). You test the TPR valve, and it sticks open...you quickly reach up and attempt to shut the water off, and that gate valve doesn't turn...now what? Shut it off at the main right? Sure, obviously. You write it up as defective, repair/replace yadda yadda....collect your check and go. The property owner comes home and finds the water shut off, has 3 kids to bath, etc.... Your name is now smeared with this guy, who will undoubtedly tell all his friends, who tell all their friends, who posts it on Facebook, tells his Realtor, on and on. For what? $80 for a plumber to come after the house is bought...or less if the homeowner does it himself? You could have saved yourself a lot of bad rep by making an educated guess on it's age (the TPR valve) and wrote it up as needing replaced/evaluated further.

    Thoughts?


  17. #17
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Thompson View Post
    Hey Joe, want to buy some tpr valves, I will sell you all you want for $30 each!
    LOL! I was being generous I know. I knew someone was going to catch me on that!


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I sometimes "gingerly" test the tpr as Jerry suggests, not always, only if suspect. How many who think it should always be done also test all of the angle stops? Ever had one of those NOT leak when turned? I check those by gently trying to turn them. If they don't want to move, I don't force them. Same idea.
    If you are going to routinely test tpr valves, I suggest carrying a few with you along with a good wrench. Oh, and don't forget the torch and solder!
    Also, just a thought: The pressure it would take to rupture the tank will be much more than you could exert with your thumb on the lever. I would bet that no matter how crudded up the valve is, it will release before the tank would blow.

    Last edited by Benjamin Thompson; 08-11-2011 at 10:08 PM.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Reality - The common sense approach doesn't mean squat if you've caused a leak in a home that your client might not even buy. And if it is a vacant home, you could be talking thousands in water damage before the drip is discovered. Talk about a disservice. Flooding a home and ruining the deal for both parties is a disservice.

    The test did not prove that the valve was defective. If it opened and water squirted out, it was not defective. But then a piece of rusty scale flowed out with the discharge and fouled the seal. You broke it by testing it.

    My report clearly states that I don't test them. That is the homeowner's job, and the homeowner can deal with the leaks.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale Fl
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Try reading that attached. See that it says must be tested once a year.

    I think some of you oughta think of not what is required by some magical authority but what you would require if your daughter son mother father or even your inlaws was buying home.

    "Oh son-in-law my water heater is leaking and I found a note from watts on the water heater that say test once a year. I sure my daughter married somebody that could read." (maybe not)

    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Mitchell Captain; 08-11-2011 at 10:26 PM. Reason: attached

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Captain View Post
    Try reading that attached. See that it says must be tested once a year.
    1) The label doesn't say that a home inspector should test the valve. It instructs the home owner to do it once a year. Or should we be going back once a year to do that for them? .
    2) It says to get a plumber to inspect it properly once every 3 years by removing it.
    "Certain naturally occurring conditions may corrode the valve or its components over time, rendering the valve inoperative. Such conditions are not detectable unless the valve and its components are physically removed and inspected. Do not attempt to conduct this inspection on your own. Contact your plumbing contractor for a reinspection to assure continuing safety".
    3) How do you know the thermostat function of the valve is working, unless you test that too, by raising the tank temperature to over 150 degrees F?

    In my area, tanks rust from the inside because of all the chlorine they put in the water, which comes from a network of lakes. (And because the tanks are thin gauge steel.) So tanks and TPRV's are replaced every 11 years, on average. We all have to decide what we're comfortable with, and if plumbing is your bag, sure, carry valves and a wrench.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  22. #22
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    1)
    3) How do you know the thermostat function of the valve is working, unless you test that too, by raising the tank temperature to over 150 degrees F?

    We all have to decide what we're comfortable with, and if plumbing is your bag, sure, carry valves and a wrench.
    Great point. Just because water comes out doesn't necessarily mean it is working properly.

    It comes down to whatever works for your business plan. If your company can afford the added risk, by all means, continue doing what you do.

    As for me, I'm taking a little from John and modifying my report, and will continue not operating them.


  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    John is right as many others also have stated. I find it hard to believe that any experienced inspector would say "Yes" to testing the TPRV. In my early years of inspecting I tried testing a couple. After one would not shut off and the resulting problems that followed, I made it a poilicy not to operate those ever again, (Plus it is clearly stated in my inspection agreement, my report and the SOP). Fortunatly the home owner was there and was pretty cool guy and shut the house down and made a trip down to the HD and made the repairs. Fortunatly the drain pipe was to the exterior and no damage was done to the owners personal property. Fortunatly no children were nearby the drain when that scalding hot water came out.
    A clear explanation to the buyers why we do NOT test and that they DO test after they move in and even a follow up in our report is the safe and logical course. Other wise I hope you have good liability insurance or can run fast.


  24. #24
    Michael Avis's Avatar
    Michael Avis Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I love the polemical debate on this topic.

    I'm with Scott Patterson. I don't test them and wouldn't even if I were "required" to. Whomever is requiring this doesn't have the HI's back in court and certainly won't pay for personal or property damage. I also don't think this "requirement" would stand up to a legal challenge.

    Based on this thread I am modifying how I handle this item... I will continue not to test them, explain why to my client and recommend that it be tested by a plumber who is equipped to handle repairs immediately if needed.

    In medicine's Hippocratic Oath physicians are required to first "Do no Harm". That sort of applies here. In our case it would be "Don't do things which are likely to do harm"

    We all know these damn things are touchy and I for one feel I am fulfilling my responsibility to my client by educating them on the topic.


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Captain View Post
    Any inspector that does not test the TPRV is doing his client a disservice unless of course his client is a home sale person.
    Since doing home inspection many would not seat and was written as tprv needs replacing. Not a single call from the seller or a lawyer.
    Hey, Mitchell ... long time!

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Thompson View Post
    I sometimes "gingerly" test the tpr as Jerry suggests, not always, only if suspect. How many who think it should always be done also test all of the angle stops?
    There is a BIG difference between angle stops and T&P relief valves ... the T&P relief valve is a SAFETY RELEASE VALVE and is required to work EVERY TIME, if an angle stop does not work, turn the water off at the house, replace the angle stop, then it works - if a T&P relief valve does not work when it needs to ... KABOOM! ... not a pretty sight.

    I pointed out in my post above that this was a SAFETY valve and that makes all the difference in the world.

    Regarding not having a T&P reset, have you ever inspected a house and had a sliding glass door come off it tracks? Or something equally difficult to correct happen? Yeah, CRAP HAPPENS, so do you make the choice to 'not test' something because crap happens?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Suelter View Post
    Great point. Just because water comes out doesn't necessarily mean it is working properly.
    While that may be a great point to try to justify not testing them, you have completely missed the point of testing them ...

    ... from the link Mitchell posted (by the way, Watts used to say to test them every 6 months, now it is one year, but I digress from the point): (red text is mine for highlighting)

    WARNING: Following installation, The valve lever MUST be operated AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR to ensure that the water-ways are clear. Certain naturally occurring mineral deposits may adhere to the valve, rendering it inoperative. When manually operating the lever, water will discharge and precautions must be taken to avoid contact with hot water and to avoid water damage. BEFORE operating lever, check to see that a discharge line is connected to this valve directing the flow of hot water from the valve to a proper place of disposal otherwise personal injury may result. If no water flows, valve is inoperative. TURN OFF THE WATER HEATER AND CALL A PLUMBER IMMEDIATELY. This device is designed for emergency safety relief and shall not be used as an operating control.

    It isn't that you are saying that the valve operations properly, you did not test it for pressure or temperature relief, what you are saying is that the valve IS INOPERATIVE when it sticks and no water flows, and that is per Watts.





    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    The valve is operated, not tested.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale Fl
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Hey, Mitchell ... long time!
    I know, but for the last three years I've been very active. I hope all is well with you and the family.

    Best Always


  30. #30
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    As I and others have said, it all comes down to your SOP requirements, your judgement, and your agreement. In other words, if it works for you, whether checking them or not, super! I choose not to. Some of you choose to. Some of you HAVE to. Neither party is right, neither party is wrong. Just boils down to what you as an inspector feels right about.

    Great post.


  31. #31
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Suelter View Post
    Great post.
    I agree...added a new water heater FYI....


  32. #32
    W. Craig McDougald's Avatar
    W. Craig McDougald Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Put the brakes on ... inspectors who are not inspecting in TEXAS!

    The TREC SOP, that we are required to follow as part of maintaining our license states that we are "required" to operate/test the TPRV on water heaters.

    There are exceptions that an inspector is allowed to follow to "not" test the TPRV, but he/she had best be extremely sure of them as TREC can levy fines against the HI for not doing what the SOP demands.
    Regarding the Texas Real Estate Commission SOP, I quote:

    (d) Specific limitations for water heaters. The inspector is not required to:
    (1) verify the effectiveness of the temperature and pressure relief valve, discharge piping, or pan drain pipes;
    (2) operate the temperature and pressure relief valve if the operation of the valve may, in the inspector's reasonable judgment, cause damage to persons or property; or
    (3) determine the efficiency or adequacy of the unit.


    I, too, inspect in Texas. Too many times I've tested and had a devil of a time getting them shut-off, so I "reasonably determine such action will jeopardize the dwelling". All too often there is something else wrong with the system (runs uphill, indeterminate ending, age/corrosion, ad infinita)
    That is reason enough for me to not open them most of the time, if ever.



  33. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Captain View Post
    I know, but for the last three years I've been very active. I hope all is well with you and the family.

    Best Always

    All is well here, hope the same there.

    Sooo ... ... I suppose you got your hair cut.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  34. #34
    W. Craig McDougald's Avatar
    W. Craig McDougald Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Also rumor has it this will be deleted in the next year's SPO revamp..........


  35. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by W. Craig McDougald View Post
    I, too, inspect in Texas. Too many times I've tested and had a devil of a time getting them shut-off, so I "reasonably determine such action will jeopardize the dwelling". All too often there is something else wrong with the system (runs uphill, indeterminate ending, age/corrosion, ad infinita) That is reason enough for me to not open them most of the time, if ever.
    "so I "reasonably determine such action will jeopardize the dwelling". All too often there is something else wrong with the system (runs uphill, indeterminate ending, age/corrosion, ad infinita) "

    So, from your statement I take it that you write them up for repair ... right?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  36. #36
    W. Craig McDougald's Avatar
    W. Craig McDougald Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I mark them "Deficient", per TREC SOP, on the TREC mandated Report form. I may, depending on the nature/severity of the deficiency, recommend an appropriate further action be taken.

    Bare in mind, neither party to the RE sale is required to do anything we find Deficient with the property, so a TPV with no drain line, no pan, on a gas heater sitting on a garage floor with a single-wall flue sticking up thru the attic in direct contact with a ceiling joist, may not be fixed by anyone, regardless of what my Report says. Real life scenario, I only hope the Buyer took steps after closing to keep the place from burning down.


  37. #37
    imported_John Smith's Avatar
    imported_John Smith Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Manually lifting a TPR valve only indicates it will open when the lever is lifted (assuming it does). It wont give any proof that the valve will lift at its specified set point. That is why they suggest inspection every 3 years. The reality is no one will ever disassemble and repair/replace parts and retest the valve. You would just replace it. Any longer than 3 years, you likely wouldn't get it out of the tank without destroying the valve/tank.
    As an inspector, you want to make sure you are doing what is required and let clients know when an item is deficient or questionable. I do what Scott does, move the lever around to see if it will even turn. Then I will test the valve. Just be prepared to explain to the owners that the valve is now leaking and wont reset if you can get it to. I would rather do that than have any one possibly get hurt from an exploding water heater. The reality is explosions are very rare, but if you are the 1 in a million that it happens to, you dont really care about the statistics.

    I cant imagine TREC ever deleting that requirement from the SOPs.

    WATTS Website

    ANNUAL OPERATION OF T&P RELIEF VALVES:

    WARNING: Following installation, the valve lever MUST be operated AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR by the water heater owner to ensure that waterways are clear. Certain naturally occurring mineral deposits may adhere to the valve, blocking waterways, rendering it inoperative. When the lever is operated, hot water will discharge if the waterways are clear. PRECAUTIONS MUST BE TAKEN TO AVOID PERSONAL INJURY FROM CONTACT WITH HOT WATER AND TO AVOID PROPERTY DAMAGE. Before operating lever, check to see that a discharge line is connected to this valve, directing the flow of hot water from the valve to a proper place of disposal. If no water flows when the lever is operated, replacement of the valve is required. TURN THE WATER HEATER “OFF” (see your water heater instruction manual) AND CALL A PLUMBER IMMEDIATELY.
    REINSPECTION OF T&P RELIEF VALVES:

    WARNING: Temperature and Pressure Relief Valves should be inspected AT LEAST ONCE EVERY THREE YEARS, and replaced, if necessary, by a licensed plumbing contractor or qualified service technician, to ensure that the product has not been affected by corrosive water conditions and to ensure that the valve and discharge line have not been altered or tampered with illegally. Certain naturally occurring conditions may corrode the valve or its components over time, rendering the valve inoperative. Such conditions can only be detected if the valve and its components are physically removed and inspected. Do not attempt to conduct an inspection on your own. Contact your plumbing contractor for a reinspection to assure continuing safety. FAILURE TO REINSPECT THIS VALVE AS DIRECTED COULD RESULT IN UNSAFE TEMPERATURE OR PRESSURE BUILD-UP WHICH CAN RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND/OR SEVERE PROPERTY DAMAGE.


  38. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by W. Craig McDougald View Post
    I mark them "Deficient", per TREC SOP, on the TREC mandated Report form. I may, depending on the nature/severity of the deficiency, recommend an appropriate further action be taken.
    Curious as to why you would not call for appropriate repairs given that you have marked them deficient?

    Bare in mind, neither party to the RE sale is required to do anything we find Deficient with the property,
    That is well understood, but that should not come into play for a home inspector to write something up and call for its replacement/repair/correction.

    It is the home inspectors job to advise their clients of items such as that, and failure to do so would be, in my opinion, a failure to perform the job correctly.

    If something is so deficient that the inspector hesitates to inspect/operate it, then that something is so deficient so as to have been determined by that inspector to be a potential hazard, and that determination now indicates that it is so deficient that it needs to be repaired/replaced/corrected.

    Take an FPE or Zinsco panel as an example, the inspector cannot determine that it is hazardous to open the cover and then NOT call for that to be repaired/replaced/corrected - in this example the call should be for replacement.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by imported_John Smith View Post
    ~SNIP~. Any longer than 3 years, you likely wouldn't get it out of the tank without destroying the valve/tank.
    ~SNIP~.
    As a plumber I will have to disagree. I have removed 1000's of T&P valves from tanks that where more than 3 years old. Lots of them the tanks have been over 10 years old, the valve just screws right out.

    These units are like a thermostat in your car. They open at a preset temperature, and open at a preset pressure. Using the lever is to ensure that the valve has clear pathways and will open.

    I had a place where they called me stating they had smoke coming out of all their commercial water closets. When I got there it was not smoke but steam. Someone felt it was a wise idea (it was not) to bypass a wiring block with a paper clip to make a 250K BTU 80 gallon water heater fire up. What they did not realize is they bypassed the thermostat, and was superheating the water. The T&P valve was never checked in the 20 years this tank was in service and it did not work as needed when the temperature and pressure got to much. Lucky for them the Sloan flush valve rubbers melted and allowed the steam to flow out of the water closets through the cold pipes. If that had not happened the heater would have ruptured and leveled that part of the building. With the new tank they have their tech open the valve once a month to make sure it is working properly.


  40. #40
    W. Craig McDougald's Avatar
    W. Craig McDougald Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Curious as to why you would not call for appropriate repairs given that you have marked them deficient?

    Who said I didn't? You're leaving words out of my mouth. In the scenario I referred to, you can bet I informed the client, her agent, and the Gas Utility person there of the danger and need for repair before the heater was put in service.

    My statement was I may make recommendation further action be taken, depending on the deficiency. I won't waste my client's time recommending what to do about a rusted dishwasher basket, but advising her on FPE panels will get some time, unless she's a licensed electrician.


  41. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hasil View Post
    I had a place where they called me stating they had smoke coming out of all their commercial water closets. When I got there it was not smoke but steam. Someone felt it was a wise idea (it was not) to bypass a wiring block with a paper clip to make a 250K BTU 80 gallon water heater fire up. What they did not realize is they bypassed the thermostat, and was superheating the water. The T&P valve was never checked in the 20 years this tank was in service and it did not work as needed when the temperature and pressure got to much. Lucky for them the Sloan flush valve rubbers melted and allowed the steam to flow out of the water closets through the cold pipes.
    Just like it shows the steam going back into the cold water supply line in this old video from Watts: http://www.constructionlitigationcon...nger_Lurks.wmv

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  42. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Just like it shows the steam going back into the cold water supply line in this old video from Watts: http://www.constructionlitigationcon...nger_Lurks.wmv
    You can get that in DVD format from watts for free. I have dozen of them and give them to customers that need education.


  43. #43
    W. Craig McDougald's Avatar
    W. Craig McDougald Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Great video, Jerry. Thanks


  44. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Here is a link from watts. The Danger scalding lurks is a good one to read as well. Danger - Scalding Lurks! - Learn About - Watts


  45. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hasil View Post
    You can get that in DVD format from watts for free. I have dozen of them and give them to customers that need education.
    Ron,

    I have two of the VHS videos, which is how they made it available 20-25 years ago, and two of the DVDs, which is how (as you pointed out) they provided it now.

    They were free back then and still are free.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  46. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Ron,

    I have two of the VHS videos, which is how they made it available 20-25 years ago, and two of the DVDs, which is how (as you pointed out) they provided it now.

    They were free back then and still are free.
    Do you still have them on 8 Track?

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  47. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    Do you still have them on 8 Track?
    No, but ... ... I still have the original Edison cylinder version of mine they borrowed to record the "talky" sound on.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  48. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    No, but ... ... I still have the original Edison cylinder version of mine they borrowed to record the "talky" sound on.
    Please don't tell me you were there.

    Great thread!

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  49. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    Wow! If I heard that from someone else I'd say what a load of ........
    Scott, I certainly don't want to question your depth of knowledge (which I have great respect for), but where did you get that one? Have I missed the boat on this method?
    I'm not sure but I think it was Mike Casey from about 20 years ago. Next time you have a TPR valve in hand give it a try. You will see the gasket moving as you twirl the handle. I have no idea if it works under pressure, but I have found plenty over the years that would not move.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  50. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Due to so some much response and different opinions on this post, I decided to experiment and try the TPRV test on an inspection yesterday. This was a five year old vacant house, drain tube to exterior, no one around. I very slowly pulled the lever until I heard and felt the water release and then let it shut off immediatly. For the next two hours until I left the inspection, the line dripped. Now, do I call out the dripping in my report or hope, between now and when the new owner does a walk thru, that the drip stops? If I do call it out that the line is dripping, it's because I caused it, doing something I shouldn't have done. If I don't call it out and it doesn't stop I get a nasty phone call. Tomorrow I may have to take the half hour drive back out there to see if it has stopped. Shouldn't have touched it.


  51. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Schaumann View Post
    Due to so some much response and different opinions on this post, I decided to experiment and try the TPRV test on an inspection yesterday. This was a five year old vacant house, drain tube to exterior, no one around. I very slowly pulled the lever until I heard and felt the water release and then let it shut off immediatly. For the next two hours until I left the inspection, the line dripped. Now, do I call out the dripping in my report or hope, between now and when the new owner does a walk thru, that the drip stops? If I do call it out that the line is dripping, it's because I caused it, doing something I shouldn't have done. If I don't call it out and it doesn't stop I get a nasty phone call. Tomorrow I may have to take the half hour drive back out there to see if it has stopped. Shouldn't have touched it.
    Tricky situation, I agree. But I would simply state that I tested the TPR, and it leaks (did not stop dripping for 2 hours). It is designed to be tested, and I don't think you caused it, I think you found it. It leaks because it is not seating properly.

    Same as if you tested the kitchen sink, and it kept dripping. Luckily it is draining outside. You may want to inform the owner of the property, so they can get thier plumber to change it.

    Next time, should you find yourself in a similar situation, try opening all the way, and letting go of the lever to reseat. Try it a few times if necessary. Sometimes it will reseat. Carry a spare in an emergency.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  52. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    As Steven said, open the relief valve all the way.
    Most often they continue to leak is because of debris on the seating surface. Opening the valve all the way several times will most times clear the debris and the valve will then seat and stop the leak. Another thing you can try is to shut off the water at the WH then close the valve, now turn the water back on.

    You should report the valve as leaking, and needs to be replaced.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  53. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    For those of you that do test the TPR valve and it does leak afterwards, all you have to say is the TPR valve is leaking and it needs to be replaced. You don't have to say a word about you being the cause of it!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  54. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Netterr View Post
    If I hired you to inspect my home, and you chose to open that for a "test" and it didn't seat correctly, I'd expect you to repair it. After all, there wasn't a leak there before you showed up. (a TPR valve is only $30-50, and can be changed with relative ease). In my opinion, it would be the right thing to do unless it specifically states in your pre-inspection agreement that you are testing such device and state the possibility (and high likelyhood) of a leak.
    coach factory outlet storeCoach outletCoCo Chanel
    If I inspected your home, and the TPR leaked after testing it, you could argue that I caused the leak... and I would probably replace the valve, only because I like to keep things "smooth."

    My question to you is, what would you argue if I met you at another home you owned, and didn't test your TPR... and the tank blew up due to a faulty TPR... and possibly someone was badly hurt, or worse. What would you then argue?

    If I flipped a light swith, and the bulb blew, would you expect me to replace the bulb?

    If something fails when operated using normal controls, how can you blame the person that operates it?

    A few weeks ago, when entering a commercial basement, one of the steps broke (a poor previous repair). Should I have repaired the step?

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  55. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    FYI, Mythbusters on a show I watched last night, while the BlueJays lost to Seattle, blew up a couple of water heaters for fun. The pressure in those tanks reached over 350 psi before they blew the bottoms out of the tanks. Does anyone here think 10 years of crud on a valve can withstand that kind of pressure? You would have to weld it shut, IMO.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  56. #56
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Turetsky View Post
    If I inspected your home, and the TPR leaked after testing it, you could argue that I caused the leak... and I would probably replace the valve, only because I like to keep things "smooth."

    My question to you is, what would you argue if I met you at another home you owned, and didn't test your TPR... and the tank blew up due to a faulty TPR... and possibly someone was badly hurt, or worse. What would you then argue?

    If I flipped a light swith, and the bulb blew, would you expect me to replace the bulb?

    If something fails when operated using normal controls, how can you blame the person that operates it?

    A few weeks ago, when entering a commercial basement, one of the steps broke (a poor previous repair). Should I have repaired the step?
    Hey Steve, this post was SPAM. I reported it earlier this morning.


  57. #57
    Joe Suelter's Avatar
    Joe Suelter Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    As said lots of times before in this very post, just because water comes out, doesn't mean it is safe...it just means the water pathway is clear. Will it operate under safety conditions? Probably, but who knows... Every inspector will handle this scenario differently. If your company can assume the possible risk, great. If you feel better about the inspection because you saw water coming out, that's fine. If you are like me, and cannot afford the risk, and you write it up accordingly, that's fine too. Everyone should have the benefit of doing it their way.

    Nobody is saying operating it is 100% wrong. It just comes with a little added risk, that's all.


  58. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Suelter View Post
    As said lots of times before in this very post, just because water comes out, doesn't mean it is safe...it just means the water pathway is clear. Will it operate under safety conditions? Probably, but who knows... Every inspector will handle this scenario differently. If your company can assume the possible risk, great. If you feel better about the inspection because you saw water coming out, that's fine. If you are like me, and cannot afford the risk, and you write it up accordingly, that's fine too. Everyone should have the benefit of doing it their way.

    Nobody is saying operating it is 100% wrong. It just comes with a little added risk, that's all.

    I agree with you.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  59. #59
    Kevin Prellop's Avatar
    Kevin Prellop Guest

    Thumbs up Re: TPR Valve reset

    Wow, so many great responses, as usual!

    Nolan...the water had been turned on earlier in the morning and the tank was filled...but the gas was off. I, in my infinite curiosity, decided to operate the valve, knowing exactly where the line terminated and feeling comfortable (but unsure) about the end result. I've always looked for "the" reason to indicate that I did not feel comfortable operating the valve. Other problems did exist with the WH, such as corrosion at the inlet/outlet connections, and more importantly, missing the piezzo igniter....so I thought, what the hell.

    So, it did drip afterwards. I was wondering if pressure needed to be built up in the tank (i.e. heated water) to "push" back on the valve and re-seal it..thinking (hoping) once the gas was turned on, the dripping would stop.
    FYI...the dripping did stop. Regardless, my report stated that due to the age of the unit, and the aforementioned problems, that it be evaluated by a QUALIFIED licensed plumber and was probably nearing the end of its useful life, in my opinion.

    In the future, I will probably just not operate them anymore, explain why, and recommend the homeowner do it, explaining to them the risks involved. It's usually fairly easy to find a reason, albeit deficiency, not to operate the TPR valve, and even easier to explain to the client the risks involved in doing so. 9 times out of 10, the client will not want me to.

    Thanks guys for all the valuable info!


  60. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Prellop View Post
    In the future, I will probably just not operate them anymore, explain why, and recommend the homeowner do it, explaining to them the risks involved.
    Kevin,

    That's the part I don't understand ... *you* will not operate it because *you* are pretty convinced that it will leak when it should not, yet, instead of writing it up as needing to be replaced or have a plumber test it and verify it is good ... *you* will probably (yes, I did notice that you said "probably") just recommend the homeowner do it.

    If by "homeowner" you mean the seller, the seller will tell your client that *you* should have tested it if *you* wanted it tested, that the homeowner is not going to do your job for your and test it.

    If by "homeowner" you mean your client, you are now delaying addressing the valve and its replacement cost until *after* closing and then your client will only have two people to cover that cost: a) themselves; b) *you*. I suspect that if the valve fails to close as you suspect it will fail, your client will call you and say that you should have either tested it or written it up for replacement and, by the way, here is the bill I had to pay the plumber to replace the valve, and that I could have had the seller pay for that if only you had written it up.

    I still don't understand what is so difficult about making a choice between: a) test it and write it up; b) don't test it because it will likely fail and write it up because it will likely fail.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  61. #61
    Michael Avis's Avatar
    Michael Avis Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    I don't get the ongoing debate here but respect the discourse nonetheless. TPR valves are touchy. They may re-seat after operating and they may not. As others have already pointed out, the ability of a TPR valve to pass water proves nothing. Will it perform to specs and relieve pressure build-up in the tank? We don't know and flipping that little lever does not in fact test this safety item for the parameters that matter.

    I witnessed a car accident the other day where a woman rear-ended someone at about 35 mph. The offending car's air bag did not operate and the woman wound up with a badly cut lip when her face impacted the steering column. Had I been asked to "inspect" her car should I be responsible for her face by merely verifying presence of an airbag?

    I choose not to operate TPR's because doing so does not verify that they will keep a hot water tank from blowing up. I also choose not to test them because I know they may not seal back up post-test and there will be potentially significant water leakage. Finally, I don't test them because if they fail to re-seat I am not equipped to fix them. Period.

    I now tell my clients that these need to be checked by a plumber who is equipped to replace them if necessary.

    To me this is a no-brainer.
    1. I'm not testing things I'm not qualified to test (relief pressure operation)
    2. I'm not testing things which I know statistically are likely not to seal back up.
    3. I advise my clients that TPR valves need regular checking by someone who can fix/replace it if it fails to re-seat.


  62. #62
    Kevin Prellop's Avatar
    Kevin Prellop Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Jerry, I understand what you're saying. I "probably" won't operate it again unless it is requested I do so by my client, after they have been informed about the problems that can arise should I do so. They are, in fact, who I owe duty to. For a buyer, that request is justified and I will fulfill their request. If it's the homeowner...I doubt they will want me to test it, having being educated of the risks. (but will informing the buyer just make them request that you test it, just so they can have a plumber come at the seller's expense?) These are the types of things I'm trying to learn from this forum...from the from the ones willing to educate their peers (A.D. Miller excluded...R.I.P. jerk).

    From all I've read, it just seems to me that the likelihood of the valve failing once I test it is pretty good. Does that logic apply to water shutoff valves at all the fixtures? Sure, a client wants to know that they will work in the event they need to use them. But the fact of the matter is they are rarely (if ever) used, and the one time the over-zealous HI turns on that knob, he's probably just created a leak. But I'm not going to write the valves up as needing to be replaced, because I don't know that. I'm also not going to recommend a plumber be called, potentially for no reason, just because I would rather place the burden and liability on him. The client, in my opinion, just needs to be informed of the reasons and risks for performing such tests, why I won't take those risks, and if they are willing to pay a professional to "break the valves and replace them" then by all means let them do it...I'm not going to take on that liability.

    You're suggesting to (a) test it, make it leak and write it up as in need of being replaced or (b) not test it and write it up as in need of being replaced, when I can't honestly say that, having not tested it. Is it just a scapegoat to pass liability? If it's the same conclusion either way, why even the discussion? And for that matter (and this is not sarcastic, an honest question)...what will the plumber do to test it? The same thing I did? Only he has one in hand to replace it with, along with the bill? It's every homeowner's responsibility to perform proper maintenance on their house..regardless of the cost or responsibilities involved. I'm simply making them aware of this responsibility, and potential risk. Truth be told, the TPR valve is designed to flip when something has gone awry, correct? So there really isn't any way to "truly" test it's competency...without plugging up the outlet, corrupting the thermostat, or what-have-you. So I have decided to make the professional decision to tell my client Why I will no longer test them, educate them on the need to "test" them as indicated by the owner's manual, and let the chips fall where they may.

    But, as Nolan pointed out earlier, I am new and gaining experience, so any and all advice to guide me in the right direction is always appreciated. Sometimes even a kick in the ass. That is, after all, the purpose of forums like this, correct? (except to I believe, that in the end, I work in the best interest of my client, and as long as they are informed as to the process and limitations of a home inspection, and I perform them to the best of my knowledge and ability, then I have performed my service and satisfied my obligations.

    with respect,
    Kevin


  63. #63
    Kevin Prellop's Avatar
    Kevin Prellop Guest

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Well said, Mr. Avis. I feel that way, too. My curiosity got the best of me in this instance.

    So my client (in this case: buyer) requests that I test it....what do I do? (I guess is my ultimate question I want answered..) If I've got an obligation to my client, yet don't want to suffer the consequences for my actions....(from homeowner or client) then I can simply state the facts, risks, and repercussions and be held harmless. Is that right?


  64. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Here's how I approach TPR valves and also angle stop valves. I put slight pressure on them. If you go to home depot you know how much pressure it takes to operate both. If I feel they will not operate with reasonable force I write them up as probably needing replacement. Let me tell you, it is much more expensive to replace a house full of angle stops than to replace a tpr valve.
    Most valves that will operate easily will not leak when operated!

    For TPR:
    The temperature pressure relief valve on the water heater does not release easily using reasonable pressure. The valve was not "forced" as this usually results in leakage due to mineral buildup. I recommend having a plumber check this safety valve with replacement if needed.

    Here's what I write up for angle stops: (gets included for most homes over 20 years old)
    "Valves at the sink and toilet supply lines (known as angle stops) are corroded and do not turn freely. This is common in areas where these valves have not been operated in some time. If valves do not turn freely, they are not forced during the inspection as leakage often results. I suggest either replacing or freeing up angle stops so that they will be operational when they are needed. When freeing stuck valves, be prepared for leakage and possible replacement."


  65. #65
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    No. San Diego Co., CA
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: TPR Valve reset

    Doesn't making repairs by the Inspector - i.e. replacing a leaking TPR valve, which was caused duiring the inspection, fall afoul or ASHI, CREIA and other 'professional' COEs and some State business regulations? Unless of course you wait a year...(Being a little facetious here... )


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •