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  1. #1
    Shane Pouch's Avatar
    Shane Pouch Guest

    Default CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Hello to all,

    I am looking for documentation on CSST class action lawsuits. Specifically, I am trying to find recommendations for the proper bonding/grounding techniques for materials already installed.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated - Thanks!

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  3. #3
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Below is an example photograph of product manufactured by Wardflex®.


    Below is an example photograph of product manufactured by Titeflex®.



    The tubing in the picture below is a Flex Connector. This product is not CSST and not at issue in this Settlement.


    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  4. #4
    Shane Pouch's Avatar
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Jim,
    Here is what it says. Which really doesn't provide any specific details. But thanks anyway. I guess I need to dig into the Codes for specifics.

    What is a Lightning Protection System and what is Bonding and Grounding?
    The Lightning Protection System will provide a measure of protection against lightning for your entire structure and many of its systems, including electrical, telephone, plumbing and gas-delivery systems. The Settling Defendants do not believe that a Lightning Protection System is necessary to render their CSST safe. They do agree, however, that such a system reduces the risks to the entire structure and many of its systems, including CSST.

    Bonding and Grounding also reduces the risk of damage from a lightning strike. Bonding and Grounding consists of tying together certain systems in a structure that are likely to be energized by a lightning strike to reduce the differences in the so-called “potential” among those systems. This reduces the likelihood of potentially destructive electrical arcing among such systems. For many years, Settling Defendants’ Design and Installation Guides instructed that CSST must be Bonded and Grounded in accordance with applicable codes.



  5. #5
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    This has some information on bonding connections for one brand. I tried to copy and paste, but I could not get it to work.
    http://www.gastite.com/include/langu.../TB2007_01.pdf

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    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  6. #6
    Shane Pouch's Avatar
    Shane Pouch Guest

    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Jim,
    So, if the house has black steel entrance piping, with one section of CSST coming off the drop to the furnace and it runs over to the only pre-manuf fireplace, the system is properly bonded if the main steel gas line is bonded back to the main electrical panel (service equip)? Can the main steel gas line be jumpered over to the main water line ground connection point?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    I am in over my head on this...

    If I understand your question, I think the system might be bonded correctly according to the CSST Man. instructions. One thing to consider though is what brand of CSST is in use.

    The water pipe would need to be bonded to the foundation steel, driven ground rod, etc. but tht is seperate from the CSST issue.
    One other thing to look at, Is the metal fireplace flue bonded? I think the wording in the code calls for all metal compenents that are likely to become energized to be bonded. It is seldom done here, but picture a lightning strike on the chimney that goes down to the fireplace and CSST connection and back to the iron pipe entrance. The CSST is the weak link.
    I think the main reason for the CSST problems is the thin walled tubing will not handle the lightning surge and it becomes the weak link.
    A bonding wire and jumper may be desirable at the fireplace cabinet and CSST outlet with the bonding going back to the equipment grounding electrode system.

    Anyone else have any thoughts on this?

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  8. #8
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    The DIAMONDBACK™ flexible gas piping or other gas system components shall not be used as a grounding electrode or as the grounding path for appliances or electrical systems.

    This quote from Diamondback brand CSST appears to support that the fireplace should not be bonded THROUGH the gas line.
    If the fireplace is electrically connected to a three wire system, that may suffice, but I would really like to hear some more knowledgable veiwpoints.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  9. #9
    Shane Pouch's Avatar
    Shane Pouch Guest

    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Jim,

    I'm wondering if there should be a jumper attached to both ends of the CSST whereas the lightning current could flow "around" the CSST (basically bypass it) by traveling down the jumper.

    In your example, a bare copper conductor attached to the fireplace enclosure and routed to wherever the CSST connects to the black steel pipe system.

    I have this exact situation in my own 2 year old house! I'm with you - I'd sure like to hear from some other folks on this one!


  10. #10
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    Default Re: CSST Class Action Settlements???

    Shane, I have seen new CSST installations here that have bonding applied to ALL metal compenents in the attic.
    Every b-vent, CSST gas line, etc., some with insulated, stranded smaller guage (10-12) wire and some with #6 or 8 solid copper. I have never seen this (yet) for homes without CSST. Most builders I have seen recently are using ridgid iron pipe... this may NOT be a trend, since there are lots of builders here and I have not inspected all brands recently.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

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