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  1. #1
    Wayne Maltry's Avatar
    Wayne Maltry Guest

    Default Kitchen Floor Drain

    I have a situation where a floor drain installed in a residential kitchen, used to facilitate clear water drainage from an icemaker, incorporates a flood guard valve to prevent flooding of the nice wood kitchen floor. I did some research and some manufacturers also referr to this as a "backwater valve". I understand the difference between a backwater valve for the building drain and a floor drain. However, is this floor drain considered a plumbing fixture and, thereby, disallowed from incorporating such a valve? My personal opinion, No.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Maltry View Post
    is this floor drain considered a plumbing fixture
    No.

    - PLUMBING FIXTURE. A receptor or device that requires both a water-supply connection and a discharge to the drainage system, such as water closets, lavatories, bathtubs and sinks. Plumbing appliances as a special class of fixture are further defined.

    - TABLE P3004.1
    - - DRAINAGE FIXTURE UNIT (d.f.u.) VALUES FOR VARIOUS PLUMBING FIXTURES
    - - - Floor drainb - 0 fixture units

    - - - b. A floor drain itself adds no hydraulic load. However, where used as a receptor, the fixture unit value of the fixture discharging into the receptor shall be applicable.

    - SECTION P3008
    - - BACKWATER VALVES
    - - P3008.1 General. Fixtures that have flood level rims located below the elevation of the next upstream manhole cover of the public sewer serving such fixtures shall be protected from backflow of sewage by installing an approved backwater valve. Fixtures having flood level rims above the elevation of the next upstream manhole shall not discharge through the backwater valve. Backwater valves shall be provided with access.
    - - P3008.2 Construction. Backwater valves shall have noncorrosive bearings, seats and self-aligning discs, and shall be constructed to ensure a positive mechanical seal. Valve access covers shall be water tight.

    Those 'flood guard' valves might fit the description for the construction of a 'backwater' valve, but I would not have thought so previously - 'might' ... ?

    "flood guard valve to prevent flooding of the nice wood kitchen floor"

    Just making sure that I understand this ... there is a floor drain ... in a kitchen with a wood floor ... ?

    "used to facilitate clear water drainage from an icemaker"

    How is the water getting from the ice maker to the floor drain? How far away is the floor drain? Where in the kitchen is the floor drain?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Wayne Maltry's Avatar
    Wayne Maltry Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    You are correct Jerry; There is a floor drain, in a kitchen with a wood floor. The icemaker discharges to the floor drain through an air gap to avod backflow. The floor drain is located just behind the icemaker. Both the floor drain and icemaker are located in a recess underneath the kitchen counter. The floor drain has a P-trap but, being the lowest point in the drainage system and having no flood level rim is susceptible, in my opinion, to flooding without some kind of backup valve.


  4. #4
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Maltry View Post
    You are correct Jerry; There is a floor drain, in a kitchen with a wood floor. The icemaker discharges to the floor drain through an air gap to avod backflow. The floor drain is located just behind the icemaker. Both the floor drain and icemaker are located in a recess underneath the kitchen counter. The floor drain has a P-trap but, being the lowest point in the drainage system and having no flood level rim is susceptible, in my opinion, to flooding without some kind of backup valve.
    Is your concern that the water will back up through the floor drain? If so you might consider this

    Individual Appliance Water Leak Detection Water Alarms Leak Alarms Shut Off Water Increase Home Safety Reduce Water Damage.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    A floor drain is a plumbing fixture by definition:

    FLOOR DRAIN. A plumbing fixture for recess in the floor having a floor-level strainer intended for the purpose of the collection and disposal of waste water used in cleaning the floor and for the collection and disposal of accidental spillage to the floor.

    The code section posted by Mr. Peck specifically states the fixture shall not discharge through a backwater valve if it is above the manhole cover.


  6. #6
    Wayne Maltry's Avatar
    Wayne Maltry Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    The International Plumbing Code, which has no such Floor Drain definition, applies in the area of this residence. A plumbing fixture is defined (and I paraphrase) as a receptacle or device connected to both the water distribution and drainage systems of the premises. I suppose the icemaker and floor drain do constitute a plumbing fixture if combined. As such, any kind of backup valve, if viewed as a backwater valve, is disallowed (see IPC Section 715). However, some measure shall be taken to protect against backflow and flooding (see IPC Section 801.2). Therefore, a standpipe (or alarm - thanks Scott) and an air gap are required by code. This is an unusual situation since icemaker appliances are not common to residential kitchens. However, they can and do happen and I think home inspectors should be prepared to address this particular situation in a standardized way.


  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Kitchen Floor Drain

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Maltry View Post
    The International Plumbing Code, which has no such Floor Drain definition, applies in the area of this residence. A plumbing fixture is defined (and I paraphrase) as a receptacle or device connected to both the water distribution and drainage systems of the premises. I suppose the icemaker and floor drain do constitute a plumbing fixture if combined. As such, any kind of backup valve, if viewed as a backwater valve, is disallowed (see IPC Section 715). However, some measure shall be taken to protect against backflow and flooding (see IPC Section 801.2). Therefore, a standpipe (or alarm - thanks Scott) and an air gap are required by code. This is an unusual situation since icemaker appliances are not common to residential kitchens. However, they can and do happen and I think home inspectors should be prepared to address this particular situation in a standardized way.
    I see stand alone ice makers I would say in about 15 to 20 percent of the homes I inspect. They are common in high end homes and homes that have wet bars. Most are connected to a drain via an indirect connection , some have a pump just like a condensation pump for an A/C unit and some drain into wherever they can make it disappear!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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