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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Iowa City, IA
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    97

    Default Water Main Material Composition

    Can someone identify the material composition of the main incoming water supply pipe (red) in this photo for me (i.e. steel, cast iron, etc.).



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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,546

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    I would call it 'steel' because it could be cast or it could be rolled and we don't have the info from the manufacturer.

    A question for you. Is this a blank that needs to be filled in in your software or are you required to report this info? It is a fire sprinkler system and it appears to be built to modern standards. Does your client need to know more than that?

    If I can't be sure I will put 'metal' and move on. Works for me.

    Last edited by John Kogel; 07-30-2014 at 09:47 AM.
    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Iowa City, IA
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    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    I would call it 'steel' because it could be cast or it could be rolled and we don't have the info from the manufacturer.

    A question for you. Is this a blank that needs to be filled in in your software or are you required to report this info? It is a fire sprinkler system and it appears to be built to modern standards. Does your client need to know more than that?

    If I can't be sure I will put 'metal' and move on. Works for me.
    Thanks for your input John. I was just curious for my own knowledge. It is the main that comings into a large condo building and feeds both the potable water supply, fire suppression sprinkler, and the exterior irrigation systems.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,248

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    The joints between the steel pipe and the red fittings are likely "grooved joints" where a groove is cut or rolled into the pipe, the fittings have a matching groove, an "O" ring goes on the pipe and into the groove, then the fitting is clamped over it.

    Most people prefer the rolled groove over the cut groove as the cut groove removes (cuts) out some of the pipe wall, whereas the rolled groove doesn't.

    Other say that the rolled groove creates a thin area in the pipe when the roller creates the groove, similar to braking a piece of sheet metal on a sheet metal brake - the thickness of the sheet metal is 'stretched' around the angle of the bend and is therefore thinner.

    I just say "Is that a leak right there?"

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The joints between the steel pipe and the red fittings are likely "grooved joints" where a groove is cut or rolled into the pipe, the fittings have a matching groove, an "O" ring goes on the pipe and into the groove, then the fitting is clamped over it.

    Most people prefer the rolled groove over the cut groove as the cut groove removes (cuts) out some of the pipe wall, whereas the rolled groove doesn't.

    Other say that the rolled groove creates a thin area in the pipe when the roller creates the groove, similar to braking a piece of sheet metal on a sheet metal brake - the thickness of the sheet metal is 'stretched' around the angle of the bend and is therefore thinner.

    I just say "Is that a leak right there?"
    The red pie coming out of the wall is ductile iron, the silver pipe is galvanized steel pipe, the fittings are Victaulic. The Victaulic fittings do not use an o-ring but special gasket. As to the statement about thin areas FM & UL approve these of these fittings. Thin areas are also created when pipe is threaded.

    go to this link for additional info: http://static.victaulic.com/assets/u...ture/06.01.pdf


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Iowa City, IA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The joints between the steel pipe and the red fittings are likely "grooved joints" where a groove is cut or rolled into the pipe, the fittings have a matching groove, an "O" ring goes on the pipe and into the groove, then the fitting is clamped over it.

    Most people prefer the rolled groove over the cut groove as the cut groove removes (cuts) out some of the pipe wall, whereas the rolled groove doesn't.

    Other say that the rolled groove creates a thin area in the pipe when the roller creates the groove, similar to braking a piece of sheet metal on a sheet metal brake - the thickness of the sheet metal is 'stretched' around the angle of the bend and is therefore thinner.

    I just say "Is that a leak right there?"
    Jerry, Thanks for the info about the fittings and joints. But what "kind" of material would you call the horizontal pipe (reddish in color) that comes in through the wall (bottom corner) with bolts used to make the connection in the flange end of the pipe?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Kolar View Post
    Jerry, Thanks for the info about the fittings and joints. But what "kind" of material would you call the horizontal pipe (reddish in color) that comes in through the wall (bottom corner) with bolts used to make the connection in the flange end of the pipe?
    The red pipe is ductile iron.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Iowa City, IA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Water Main Material Composition

    Quote Originally Posted by William Heuberger View Post
    The red pipe is ductile iron.
    Ah ha! Thank you William!


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