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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Default Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    On a recent inspection I called out further review for the above title. I searched past posts but could not find specific documentation.

    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...pen-flame.html

    A licensed plumber stated all ok, but I'll be recommending he provide his own documentation. I do not know the brand of piping used, but similar info from Gastite states that the melting point for their tubing is 2400 degrees. I won't be using this as a source obviously, but wondered if any out there could help.

    Thank you,
    Chris

    ScreenHunter_09 Mar. 02 18.29.jpg

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Arizona
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    84

    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Thanks for the past help. This forum has always been a great help on previous posts. I see that I posted in the wrong area...my bad

    Any other reason for no feedback?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Peoria Arizona
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    If you read some of the different Operating Specifications, the flexible gas connectors are rated from -40 degrees to 150 degrees F.

    http://www.brasscraft.com/PDF/300.02...Connectors.pdf

    http://www.brasscraft.com/PDF/300.06...Connectors.pdf

    Gas Log & Fireplace Connectors

    Jeff

    Last edited by Jeff Euriech; 03-03-2015 at 10:49 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    I see similar installations, too. In the past, I called out some and had plumbers, installers and even an AHJ tell me that they are ok. However, if the flex is actually in the flame, that is wrong.....usually.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    No. San Diego Co., CA
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Okay, as long as it is an approved connection for the application and out of direct contact with flame. I haven't run across any manufacturers ( or code for that matter) stipulating any specific distance from flame but obviously the further the better.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
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    Cool Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Flexible gas appliance connectors are not CSST. Flex connectors are approved for use inside fireplaces as long as they don't see flame impingement or significant heat. The unit shown is a sand pan burner. It is a high btu input with a large sloppy flame that could easily waft over to that flex connector which is curved forwards. It should be rotated towards the rear. This is also why gas should enter on the left and wrap around behind the burner so you don't have to shove the burner off center to make room for the connector and valve. That gas line penetration needs to be properly sealed both chinked at the inner wall conduit then with high temperature cement at the knockout.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Holladay, UT
    Posts
    565

    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Hi Bob, I always learn something from your posts. Gas fireplace installation is not one of my strong points. Where could I go for reference material and installation practices other than the manufacturer. Thanks!!

    Tom Rees / A Closer Look Home Inspection / Salt Lake City, Utah

  8. #8
    Loren Sanders Sr.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    Flexible gas appliance connectors are not CSST. Flex connectors are approved for use inside fireplaces as long as they don't see flame impingement or significant heat. The unit shown is a sand pan burner. It is a high btu input with a large sloppy flame that could easily waft over to that flex connector which is curved forwards. It should be rotated towards the rear. This is also why gas should enter on the left and wrap around behind the burner so you don't have to shove the burner off center to make room for the connector and valve. That gas line penetration needs to be properly sealed both chinked at the inner wall conduit then with high temperature cement at the knockout.
    I suggest the piping should all be hard piped with black gas piping and a union used to make the connection. When one makes this type of installation one should ask if one would install it this way in his own home where his family is. Sometimes common sense is in order. I agree with the sealing with Hi Temp Cement is in order. Guys, don't take short cuts in your work...gives you a bad reputation and probably higher insurance rates and possibly a law suit.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    Flexible gas appliance connectors are not CSST. Flex connectors are approved for use inside fireplaces as long as they don't see flame impingement or significant heat. The unit shown is a sand pan burner. It is a high btu input with a large sloppy flame that could easily waft over to that flex connector which is curved forwards. It should be rotated towards the rear. This is also why gas should enter on the left and wrap around behind the burner so you don't have to shove the burner off center to make room for the connector and valve. That gas line penetration needs to be properly sealed both chinked at the inner wall conduit then with high temperature cement at the knockout.
    I suggest the piping should all be hard piped with black gas piping and a union used to make the connection. When one makes this type of installation one should ask if one would install it this way in his own home where his family is. Sometimes common sense is in order. I agree with the sealing with Hi Temp Cement is in order. Guys, don't take short cuts in your work...gives you a bad reputation and probably higher insurance rates and possibly a law suit.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    Flexible gas appliance connectors are not CSST. Flex connectors are approved for use inside fireplaces as long as they don't see flame impingement or significant heat. The unit shown is a sand pan burner. It is a high btu input with a large sloppy flame that could easily waft over to that flex connector which is curved forwards. It should be rotated towards the rear. This is also why gas should enter on the left and wrap around behind the burner so you don't have to shove the burner off center to make room for the connector and valve. That gas line penetration needs to be properly sealed both chinked at the inner wall conduit then with high temperature cement at the knockout.
    I suggest the piping should all be hard piped with black gas piping and a union used to make the connection. When one makes this type of installation one should ask if one would install it this way in his own home where his family is. Sometimes common sense is in order. I agree with the sealing with Hi Temp Cement is in order. Guys, don't take short cuts in your work...gives you a bad reputation and probably higher insurance rates and possibly a law suit.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Cool Re: Flexible gas connector in contact with flame

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rees View Post
    Hi Bob, I always learn something from your posts. Gas fireplace installation is not one of my strong points. Where could I go for reference material and installation practices other than the manufacturer. Thanks!!
    The very best is Dale Feb's Certified Fireplace and Chimney Inspector's course. It's a week and not cheap but the best there is. You'll learn more about building codes, documentation and and report writing than with any other course I've heard of.

    You can get some good generic information from the National Fireplace Institute at nficertified.org
    HTH

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

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