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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    California
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    22

    Question TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Ok, everyone knows that a TPR should discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by occupants, because discharge indicates that something is wrong, and to prevent unobserved termination capping...etc

    But does anyone know the YEAR that this came to be ??

    I have some houses built in 1989 in California, that the builder in order to give the owner some land, (is all I can assume), put the right hand side of the property directly on the property line, yes that's right if you want to paint the house, spray it off or even clean the windows you have to go into your neighbors yard. Oddly enough this is the same side that the A/C drains into, and the TPR valve is at. So in essence it is up to your neighbor to tell you if you have a TPR issue as you cannot see it.

    So again, I am looking for a date / year when the 'must be visible' came in to play...Thanks

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Joe,

    Basically, it has 'always' been that way.

    You saw where the T&P discharge line was, on the neighbors side of the house on the zero lot line side, right?

    Soo ... it was "visible", right?

    Code does not address "visible" from where, that is left to common sense (and many contractors exhibit so little common sense that one wonders how they can manage to be to nonsensical).

    Also, were there any soffit vents on that side of the house? Any overhang on that side of the house? Any windows on that side of the house?

    If so, there may very well be fire related issues as that wall would need to be at least 1 hour rated, which means 1 hour rated soffit vents (have fire dampers above each vent), 1 hour rated windows, possibly even 1 hour rated roofing at that point, and any overhang along that side would be ... over the neighbors property, so anything they wanted to do to the overhang is ... well ... that overhang is 'theirs'.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    California
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    22

    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Joe,

    Basically, it has 'always' been that way.

    You saw where the T&P discharge line was, on the neighbors side of the house on the zero lot line side, right?

    Soo ... it was "visible", right?

    Code does not address "visible" from where, that is left to common sense (and many contractors exhibit so little common sense that one wonders how they can manage to be to nonsensical).

    Also, were there any soffit vents on that side of the house? Any overhang on that side of the house? Any windows on that side of the house?

    If so, there may very well be fire related issues as that wall would need to be at least 1 hour rated, which means 1 hour rated soffit vents (have fire dampers above each vent), 1 hour rated windows, possibly even 1 hour rated roofing at that point, and any overhang along that side would be ... over the neighbors property, so anything they wanted to do to the overhang is ... well ... that overhang is 'theirs'.

    It was visible if you looked over the fence, (I would not call it easily visible) this was a 2-story house and I do believe a window was upstairs but no way could you see the line from there, also there was no over-hangs, no soffits, nothing on that side, the house was for all purposes the fence. This was not a common wall so fire rating should not matter, it was a good 15' to the neighbors house. Instead of building the house with 7' of yard on each side, they built it with 0' on 1 side and 15' on the other side.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    This was not a common wall so fire rating should not matter, it was a good 15' to the neighbors house.
    It's not the distance to the other house that determines fire rating, it's the distance from the property line that determines the fire rating.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    California
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    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    It's not the distance to the other house that determines fire rating, it's the distance from the property line that determines the fire rating.
    Didn't know that, and without tearing it down I would have no way to tell.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
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    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    Didn't know that, and without tearing it down I would have no way to tell.
    A window on that wall or any combustible construction would be a problem.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  7. #7
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    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
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    1,437

    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    Zero lot line is common here. It's a pain when the neighbor isn't home, has a locked gate or a big dog.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: TPR Valves and Discharge Piping

    To add additional information and clarification to the below part of the discussion;

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    This was not a common wall so fire rating should not matter, it was a good 15' to the neighbors house.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    It's not the distance to the other house that determines fire rating, it's the distance from the property line that determines the fire rating.
    For residential, the foremost requirement will be based on how for the wall of the house is from from the property line as the requirement was originally intended to reduce the risk of fire spreading from one properly to another to another and entire towns burning down.

    There are also some requirements which apply to two or more building on the same lot (no property line between them), but those are lesser requirements and most often only come into play for detached garages.

    For non-residential properties, there are stricker requirements for distance to property lines (more restrictive than for residential), and lesser requirements for buildings on the same lot (but also more restrictive than for residential).

    As soon as you see a zero lot line house (or basically less than 3' to 5' to the property line, many times it's "less than 10 feet") ... it you see any openings (wndows, doors, exhaust vents, soffit vents, etc) start thinking about that wall and fire rating ... and the fire rating established for that distance would apply to both sides of the wall (fire from outside the building or from inside the building).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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