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  1. #1
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    Default Faucet cartridge longevity

    I used to install and repair sink faucets with rubber or silicone washers that wore out after several years. Then I installed some single-handle faucets that incorporate cartridges. I wonder about the expected lifespan.

    Eight years ago, I installed a Kraus single-handle faucet at a bathroom sink. A few years ago, it started to leak, and I replaced the cartridge. It's started to leak again. There are only two of us, and this is not the only bathroom we use.

    Is this reasonable longevity?

    I'm trying to decide whether to replace the cartridge again, swap it out for a Moen single-handle faucet, or go back to the washer type. What are your thoughts/experiences?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    I haven't heard of Kraus before, is it a 'builder's line brand, a mid-level, or higher quality brand?

    Of course, keeping in mind that many brands have different price lrvel/quality faucets.

    I prefer Moen and Delta, but have had excellent results with dome other brands too.

    Delta has, at least for all the Delra faucets I've had, had lifetime warranty on their parts, including sprayers (like at kitchen faucets).

    Hard to beat a lifetime warranty. And, yes, Delta has always sent replacement parts when they were needed.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Thanks, Jerry.

    Kraus is priced between Delta and Moen. I believe they claim U.S. manufacture, like Moen, but offer a five-year warranty, rather than lifetime. I'm a bit more concerned with reliability than with warranty terms; I also like the idea of buying products whose manufacture may, I recognize it's just may, be kinder to the factory workers and environment than I expect in China.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by david shapiro View Post
    I'm a bit more concerned with reliability than with warranty terms;
    David, I agree, however, nothing lasts forever, and knowing that a product has a company who will stand behind their product is very worthwhile.

    The kitchen faucet in the house we had in Ormond Beach, FL, was put in in 2006 when we bought the house and remodeled the kitchen. Between 2006 and 2021 when we sold the house and moved to Asheville, NC, I had to replace the cartridge once and the hand-held sprayer once, both replaced under their lifetime warranty. Both were simple for me to replace.

    I think that is a very good lifespan of use.

    That said, though, the tub/shower valves in both bathrooms were the old Moen Moentrol types originally installed in 1979. I have no idea of their life between 1979 and 2006, but between 2006 and 2021 I replaced both cartridges once. I have always been a fan of those old Moentrol faucets as they were well made and long-lasting. They were also very easy to replace the cartridge in them.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Most cartridges last for many years, maybe that model uses lesser quality materials or poor factory standards. Maybe the water quality is a bit off.

    Moen offers lifetime parts (call them and they send the new part for free), and other fixture manufactures do that as well.

    I recently replaced a cartridge in a 5-year-old American Standard bath faucet, gets heavy daily use.

    I wouldn't think you'd want to buy (if you could) a faucet with rubber washers & seats in today's world.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Thanks, Jerry, Dom.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    The denouement, with additional details:

    I will be replacing the ~8 y.o. Kraus faucet with a Moen. Nowadays some Moen faucets are manufactured in the U.S., some assembled here. Some have lifetime warranties for the original owner, some far more limited.

    Here's why:

    I really wanted to give cartridge replacement a shot, partly because I will need to unscrew a tilt-out drawer to undo the faucet, and partly out of perverse, cognitive-dissonance commitment: it took forever for me to figure out which allen wrench I needed, as the cartridge access faces the backsplash. However, once I got it out, I realized it just was not worth replacing. Kraus no longer supports this model, and I can get a Moen for little more than the price of an aftermarket cartridge that should fit. Kraus did generously offer to sell me a current model, at discount--with a genuine five-year warranty! I demurred politely.

    Happy holidays to those who celebrate around now.

    -The Grinch


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Thanks for the update.

    It will likely be a good decision, even if the faucet you select has a shorter than 5 year warranty, as Moen parts are still available for 40 year old (or more) fixtures.

    (FWIW, my brother called Moen very recently for a 10 year old +/- kitchen faucet problem, they shipped the parts out free.)


  9. #9

    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Hello everyone,

    Great discussion on faucet cartridge longevity! At Aaron Services, we've dealt with a variety of faucet issues and have some insights that might help shed light on this topic.

    Cartridge Longevity:
    It's true that the lifespan of faucet cartridges can vary significantly based on the brand, model, and the quality of water in your area. Hard water, for instance, can be particularly harsh on plumbing fixtures, leading to quicker degradation of cartridges. It?s important to consider water treatment solutions if you're dealing with hard water to extend the life of your plumbing components.

    Choosing a Faucet:
    When choosing a new faucet or deciding whether to replace a cartridge, it's essential to consider both the quality of the product and the warranty offered. Brands like Moen and Delta not only provide quality products but also stand behind them with strong warranties, which can be a significant advantage.

    Installation Tips:
    Proper faucet installation and regular maintenance are key to extending the life of your faucets. Make sure that your faucet is installed correctly and that you regularly check for signs of wear or leaks. Sometimes, even a minor adjustment can significantly extend a faucet's life.

    When to Replace:
    If you find yourself frequently replacing parts or dealing with leaks, it might be more cost-effective in the long run to invest in a higher-quality faucet from a reputable manufacturer. This upfront investment can save you time and money on future repairs.

    Lastly, if you're facing recurring issues or need advice on a specific situation, our team at Aaron Services is always here to help with expert plumbing services. We understand the nuances of various installations and can provide tailored recommendations based on your needs.

    Thanks for sharing your experiences, and don't hesitate to reach out if you need professional advice!

    P.S. Also, for those interested in further optimizing their home water usage and saving on bills, I invite you to check out our Water Savings Calculator. This tool can help you understand how much you could save by switching to water-efficient fixtures, like low-flow faucets and showerheads. These small changes not only contribute to significant savings over time but also help in conserving a precious resource. Feel free to explore and see how adjusting your home fixtures can make an environmental and financial impact!

    Happy holidays and best wishes for your plumbing projects!


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Services View Post
    Thanks for sharing your experiences, and don't hesitate to reach out if you need professional advice!
    Thank for sharing your perspective. As you seem to be deeply invested in the plumbing world as I am in electrical, I'd like your perspective on another matter.

    First question: how common has it been since the early 1990s for a residence's interior water lines to be run in copper (or other metallic systems)?

    Second question: how commonly have you run into water lines with trickle current running along them?

    Third question: how commonly do you encounter interior metal water lines with metal ground wires coming from receptacles and bonded to them?

    NFPA 73, Electrical Inspection of Existing Dwellings, has a May deadline for comments on the first draft of its next, 2025, edition. One of my PIs would have required bonding around interruptions in metallic interior water lines, such as nonmetallic tubing or pipe, or push fittings that don't maintain electrical continuity. I plan to offer a comment modifying the PI, so that with luck it will be accepted. However, permission to run a ground wire from an ungrounded receptacle and replace with with a three-prong receptacle was eliminated in the 1993 NEC. The concern was that if the grounding path through the plumbing line was interrupted, a ground fault would not trip the overcurrent device but would leave the plumbing energized. I don't know how much of a risk remains.

    I'd appreciate your thoughts.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    David, they are posting boilerplate in various categories.

    I noticed the first one down in the homeowner section yesterday, I think it was. Then the current two posts today.

    I would be surprised if you get an answer and a conversation going, but we will find out.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  12. #12

    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Hello David,

    Thank you for reaching out with such detailed questions. It's great to engage with someone as immersed in their field as you are in electrical systems. I?m glad to share insights from the plumbing perspective that might help inform your upcoming comments for NFPA 73.


    First Question: Interior Water Lines Materials Since the 1990s


    Since the early 1990s, the use of copper for interior water lines has remained fairly common due to its durability and resistance to corrosion. However, there has been a significant shift towards using PEX (cross-linked polyethylene) in residential plumbing. PEX is flexible, easier to install, less prone to freeze-breakage, and generally more cost-effective than copper. While copper is still widely regarded for its longevity and reliability, PEX has become increasingly popular, especially in new construction and major renovations.

    Second Question: Trickle Current in Water Lines

    Encountering trickle currents along water lines is uncommon but not unheard of. This usually happens when there's a fault in the electrical system, and the electrical current seeks alternative paths to ground. Metal pipes can inadvertently become these paths if not properly isolated or if the electrical grounding system is compromised. It's a rare occurrence, but one that requires immediate correction to prevent potential safety hazards.

    Third Question: Metal Water Lines and Grounding

    It is increasingly uncommon to see interior metal water lines used as grounding electrodes, primarily because of the reasons you've mentioned and updates in building codes and standards. The National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes typically require that water piping systems, if used as part of the grounding system, be supplemented by other grounding electrodes. The concern, as you noted, is ensuring that any interruption does not compromise the grounding path, thereby posing a risk of leaving the plumbing system energized.

    Regarding Your NFPA 73 Comment and Concerns

    Your approach to requiring bonding around interruptions in metallic water lines is prudent. The risk of an energized plumbing system due to interrupted grounding paths is significant and warrants careful consideration in the NFPA standards. Modern plumbing and electrical systems are designed to minimize such risks, but as you?ve correctly pointed out, older systems or those with mixed materials can present unique challenges. Updating standards to address these scenarios comprehensively is crucial.

    As for the practice of using plumbing as a ground, the elimination of permission to run ground wires from ungrounded receptacles to plumbing lines in the 1993 NEC was a significant step toward improving safety. The residual risks you mention are exactly why ongoing updates to codes like NFPA 73 are so essential.

    I hope these insights assist in your efforts with the NFPA comments. Should you need more detailed discussion or specific case studies, feel free to reach out. Our team at Aaron Services is always here to provide expert advice.


  13. #13

    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Hi Jerry,

    I appreciate your skepticism? it's always good to keep us on our toes! We're here not just to share what we know but also to learn from and engage with the community. We're looking forward to more interactive discussions and hope to prove that our contributions are indeed valuable.

    Thanks for keeping the dialogue open and honest.

    p.s.
    Aaron Services has over 1,700 reviews with an average rating of 4.9 stars. We take pride in our service and are eager to contribute here with the same level of expertise and care. Take a look - https://www.google.com/search?q=aaro...28bb8778a2c9,1,,,,

    Last edited by Aaron Services; Yesterday at 03:28 PM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Services View Post
    I appreciate your skepticism?
    When someone posts here without using their real name, which is what is asked for when registering, it raises red flags.

    When someone posts multiple boiler plate posts, those red flags become hurricane warning flags.

    You can click on the "Contact Us" link at the bottom of the web page and ask Brian, the owner of the site, to change your user name to your real name ... or not ... and which ever you do will tell us a lot of what to expect.

    Not skepticism as much as historical precedent from others who have done those things.

    I would like to see that I was wrong and that it may have been, as you say, skepticism. Looking forward to your input as a real person posting questions and/or answering questions from others.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  15. #15

    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    When someone posts here without using their real name, which is what is asked for when registering, it raises red flags.

    When someone posts multiple boiler plate posts, those red flags become hurricane warning flags.

    You can click on the "Contact Us" link at the bottom of the web page and ask Brian, the owner of the site, to change your user name to your real name ... or not ... and which ever you do will tell us a lot of what to expect.

    Not skepticism as much as historical precedent from others who have done those things.

    I would like to see that I was wrong and that it may have been, as you say, skepticism. Looking forward to your input as a real person posting questions and/or answering questions from others.
    Fair enough, Jerry. I appreciate your point about using real names to foster transparency within the forum. I chose to use our company name, hoping it would make it easier for local residents who might be looking for our services to recognize us. Additionally, I have recently reevaluated the use of my real name on the internet due to privacy concerns and the overwhelming amount of spam it has attracted.


    I am curious, what did you mean by boilerplate posts? I haven't posted anything yet, I only responded to a few posts that didn't have many replies as my intention was merely to engage in discussions that hadn?t received much attention. I thought that responding to these could be a good starting point.


    If Brian feels that my continued participation isn?t suitable without using a real name, I understand if he chooses to deactivate my account, and I will seek another community where I can contribute.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Your continued posts under your company name will not affect anything. We had a few (a couple of them?) other members who didn't use their real names when registering either, and didn't change them later.

    It's, as you said, a transparency issue.

    I fully understand about the spam issue, but you'll get that with any name you use as spam bots just plug whatever "name" they find into whatever they send out. It's all automated, no thinking person behind it.

    Using real names is for professional reasons.

    Real names is not "required", they are the asked for and used professionally.

    Saying " Welcome to this board 'Mr Aaron Services' " just sounds like, well, so fake and insincere. Like welcoming a poster board cutout into a photo shoot. But that just doesn't give a warm and fuzzy welcome.

    Oh well ... welcome aboard Mr. Aaron Services.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  17. #17

    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Your continued posts under your company name will not affect anything. We had a few (a couple of them?) other members who didn't use their real names when registering either, and didn't change them later.

    It's, as you said, a transparency issue.

    I fully understand about the spam issue, but you'll get that with any name you use as spam bots just plug whatever "name" they find into whatever they send out. It's all automated, no thinking person behind it.

    Using real names is for professional reasons.

    Real names is not "required", they are the asked for and used professionally.

    Saying " Welcome to this board 'Mr Aaron Services' " just sounds like, well, so fake and insincere. Like welcoming a poster board cutout into a photo shoot. But that just doesn't give a warm and fuzzy welcome.

    Oh well ... welcome aboard Mr. Aaron Services.
    You can just say "Welcome, Aaron Services"?nothing wrong with that. What I meant about spam isn't just the automated emails you're talking about. I have a pretty unique name, and a couple of months ago, when I Googled myself, it was a bit unnerving how much personal information was accessible without my knowledge. All the addresses I've ever lived at, all my previous phone numbers, were easily findable just by scrolling through a few pages of Google search results. Since then, I've been more cautious about how my information is shared online. Do yourself a favor and Google yourself; see what you find. I know we are getting a bit off-topic, but hopefully, this will help you understand my perspective better.


  18. #18
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    Default Re: Faucet cartridge longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Services View Post
    Do yourself a favor and Google yourself; see what you find.
    I have done that before, and I find all kinds of things, many about people with my same name and some actually about me.

    If you believe everything you read on the internet ... well ... not sure what to say if you do.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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