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Thread: What is this?

  1. #1
    Jim McClendon's Avatar
    Jim McClendon Guest

    Default What is this?

    It is attached to the cold water supply and appears to drop into the ac condensation drain line.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Only thing I can think of an attempt at a way to flush out the condensate line.

    Looks to me like its going to be

    "An attic water-garden with decorative waterfall..."

    if that value is fully opened when the supply is pressurized.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: What is this?

    It could also be called a cross contamination potability.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Do The Mice have an Ice Maker Hooked Up?

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  5. #5
    Jim McClendon's Avatar
    Jim McClendon Guest

    Talking Re: What is this?

    My favorite is the mice icemaker supply line.


  6. #6
    Richard Moore's Avatar
    Richard Moore Guest

    Default Re: What is this?

    As I couldn't figure out how the smaller take-off was controlled, I did a little googling looking for a similar valve. I think (fairly sure) what you have there is actually a pressure relief valve...

    See Watts: BRV | Specialty Ball Valves | Water Safety & Flow Control

    Series BRV Combination Ball Valve and Relief Valves are used in commercial and residential applications on water heater installations. It consists of a bronze body construction with a full port (reduced port with PEX connection), nickel-plated brass ball, blowout-proof brass stem, PTFE seats, stem packing, and stem thrust bearing, Viton relief ball, stainless steel relief spring, brass adapter, and steel handle (the relief valve outlet includes a drain tube connection with PEX or compression fitting models). Series BRV has a low profile design and can be installed in any position. It is for applications that require a means to shut off the water supply to the water heater and for providing protection from excess water pressure caused by thermal expansion. Pressure Rated: 400psi. Relief Valve Pressure Settings: 75, 80, 100 or 125psi (5.2, 5.5, 6.9 or 8.6 bar).
    My understanding is that these are sometimes used in combination with a temperature only gas shut-off valve at the water heater when the plumbing for a normal T&P valve is not practical. (see Watts: 210-5 | Automatic Gas Shutoff Valve | Water Safety & Flow Control )

    I've never actually seen that set-up, and why you would have one in this application is a mystery, but I'm also sure that it shouldn't be connected to the AC condensate piping. An over-pressure discharge would also try to feed back to the AC and probably flood the attic. Frankly, the WH plumbing in the photo looks FUBAR and it's time for a plumber.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Michael has probably the right idea. They hooked up the line to be able to flush out the primary condensate drain line periodically instead of having to pay out the 175. to the HVAC man to do so.

    Then again it could be to an ice-maker.

    Looks like they need some insulation on those water lines being in the attic space.

    rick


  8. #8
    Richard Moore's Avatar
    Richard Moore Guest

    Default Re: What is this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Michael has probably the right idea. They hooked up the line to be able to flush out the primary condensate drain line periodically instead of having to pay out the 175. to the HVAC man to do so.
    Rick, did you see my post above? With all due respect, the green handle is the shut-off for the main feed to the water heater. There is no shut-off handle for the smaller tee so how would that work for flushing?

    I'm 99.999% certain this is a Watts combo shut-off & pressure relief valve.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: What is this?

    I think Richard Nailed it.

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    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Richard,

    I had not read down that far when I posted, but now you have shed new light.

    I believe you are correctamundo.

    rick


  11. #11
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Richard got the valve right, but ...

    Michael and Scott have the results right.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  12. #12
    Jim McClendon's Avatar
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Thanks to all.


  13. #13
    Rick Seifert's Avatar
    Rick Seifert Guest

    Default Re: What is this?

    Looks like a stop/waste valve to me. When the valve is in the off position the internal orifice is opened to allow the pressure to bleed off


  14. #14
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    Holladay, UT
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    Default Re: What is this?

    In my area code requires an expansion tank in a closed system with water pressure over 80 psi. This looks like a Thermal Expansion Ball Valve which serves the same purpose as an expansion tank. Not real common and more expensive than expansion tank.


  15. #15
    Matthew Skowron's Avatar
    Matthew Skowron Guest

    Default Re: What is this?

    Valve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    all you never wanted to know about valves and more


  16. #16
    Matthew Skowron's Avatar
    Matthew Skowron Guest

  17. #17
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    Default Re: What is this?

    Matthew,



    This is from Richard's post on 2/5 above:
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Moore View Post
    I did a little googling looking for a similar valve. I think (fairly sure) what you have there is actually a pressure relief valve...

    See Watts: BRV | Specialty Ball Valves | Water Safety & Flow Control
    Your link shows the same valve.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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