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  1. #1
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    Mar 2007
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    Default What is this "tank"?

    "Tank" at right of picture:

    1) What is it?

    2) How do I inspect it?

    3) Where do I learn more about it?

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  2. #2
    Tim Connors's Avatar
    Tim Connors Guest

    Talking Re: What is this "tank"?

    This is an above floor ejector pit (no hole neccessary) for sewage. You will also see this application used for basement wet bars, washers and etc. Can also be used when basement toliets are built on a platform.


  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Hudson, WI
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Connors View Post
    This is an above floor ejector pit (no hole neccessary) for sewage. You will also see this application used for basement wet bars, washers and etc. Can also be used when basement toliets are built on a platform.
    You're right Tim.

    I didn't expand the pic before posting. oops. I deleted my post.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    Thanks,

    I've never seen one before (other than the "Quick John" type where the front section of the tank is a raised support for the toilet) as usually a drain line below the basement floor is entering a sump.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  5. #5
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    Healdsburg, CA
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    For those in the Golden State; CPC 2007 - 710. We don't inspect, but disclaim. When they go bad it is not a pleasent sight! I also advise all to inform their clients not to use any plumbings fixtures connected to a sewage ejector system, especially a WC, should the electrical power be off.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    West Coast Jerry,

    Have you read what is under that drawing?

    "The discharge for the pump should be 2 in. dia. min. Pipes >2 in. for discharge could prematurely wear out the pump due to increased head pressure."

    I'm not quite sure on this, but ...

    Isn't "2 in. dia. min." and " >2 in. " the same thing?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  7. #7
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    I have also seen them not vented properly.


  8. #8
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    Memphis TN.
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    West Coast Jerry,

    Have you read what is under that drawing?

    "The discharge for the pump should be 2 in. dia. min. Pipes >2 in. for discharge could prematurely wear out the pump due to increased head pressure."

    I'm not quite sure on this, but ...

    Isn't "2 in. dia. min." and " >2 in. " the same thing?

    Mr. Peck,

    I read it as "2 in. dia. min. and a warning if 2 in. was used as the minimum install that it

    could prematurely wear out the pump due to increased head pressure.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Stephens View Post
    I read it as "2 in. dia. min. and a warning if 2 in. was used as the minimum install that it

    could prematurely wear out the pump due to increased head pressure.
    Billy,

    Except that it says ">"2 inches, i.e., "greater than" 2 inches - not "2 inches".

    I believe the symbol should have been "<" for "less than" 2 inches.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    CPC 2007
    Sewage Ejector Systems:
    710.3.1
    Shall have a minimum discharge capacity of twenty (20) gallons per minute.
    710.3.2In single dwelling units, the ejector or pump shall be capable of passing a one and one-half (1-1/2) inch diameter solid ball, and the discharge piping of each ejector or pump shall have a back water valve and gate valve, and be a minimum of two (2) inches in diameter.
    710.3.3In other than single-dwelling units, the ejector or pump shall be capable of passing a Two (2) inch diameter solid ball, and the discharge piping of each ejector or pump shall Have a backwater valve and gate valve, and be a minimum of three (3) inches in diameter.
    710.3.3.1[HCD1&HCD2]The minimum size of any pump or any discharge pipe from a sump having a water closet connected there to shall be not less than (2) inches Any pump or any discharge pipe from a sump having a water closet connected there to shall be not less than (2) inches..
    710.4The discharge line from such ejector, pump, or other mechanical device shall be provided with an accessible back water or swing check valve and gate or ball valve. If the gravity drainage line to which the discharge line connects is horizontal, the method of connection shall be from the top through a wye branch fitting. The gate or ball valve shall be located on the discharge side of the back water or check valve, gate or ball valves, when installed in drainage piping, shall be full-way type with working parts of corrosion-resistant metal. Sizes four (4) inches or more in diameter shall have cast-iron bodies, and sizes less than four (4) inches, cast-iron or brass bodies

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    OK Jerry P., Read it out loud and see if you get what I did.
    Paraphrase: You must use a minimum 2" discharge pipe but If you use a pipe bigger than 2" it may wear out quicker. So just use the 2" pipe instead of a 3 or 4 or 5"...
    JMHO

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  12. #12
    Brandon Chew's Avatar
    Brandon Chew Guest

    Default Re: What is this "tank"?

    "The discharge for the pump should be 2 in. dia. min. Pipes >2 in. for discharge could prematurely wear out the pump due to increased head pressure."
    I believe the symbol should have been "<" for "less than" 2 inches.
    I agree. The diagram has a misprint.

    The first part, which agrees with the code cite that Jerry M provided, says the pipe needs to be a minimum of 2 inches in diameter. The second part reads "Pipes greater than 2 inches for discharge..." but should read "Pipes less than 2 inches for discharge...." For any given flow rate, the head pressure is going to be higher on a smaller diameter discharge pipe than it will be on a larger one.


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