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Thread: Flow guard CPVC

  1. #1
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Flow guard CPVC

    Anyone heard anything good/bad/indifferent about this supply pipe.
    Found this on 1997 colonial. Very rare around here to see anything but copper. Flow guard Gold CPVC. Says good for 100 PSI and I believe it said 160 degrees.
    Thanks

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    Just normal CPVC. With the price of copper you will be seeing more CPVC and PEX.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    imported_John Smith's Avatar
    imported_John Smith Guest

    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    I just inspected a new home in Katy Texas with Flow Guard brand CPVC piping. Not a cheap home neither, about 260K


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    (C)PVC can not be used for hot/cold water supply, just TPR drain line.
    Say what?

    CPVC CAN BE USED for all water distribution piping, hot, cold, T&P relief valve discharge line, etc.

    PVC may only be used for the water service outside the house or DWV piping.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
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    Talking Re: Flow guard CPVC

    Quote Originally Posted by imported_John Smith View Post
    I just inspected a new home in Katy Texas with Flow Guard brand CPVC piping. Not a cheap home neither, about 260K
    You cant buy a home here for 260K, except maybe a 1950 1000 square foot home with no upgrades.

    Bill Siegel
    Florida Home Inspection Team Inc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    We just have more build able land here. A $260K house here will only use $20k to 30k for land cost. Also our labor is cheaper. So a new 260k house here is typically going to be a 2300 sq ft two story house, 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2-3 baths, and two car garage in a new neighborhood. I'll bet your land price is at least $120k for a starter home like you described.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  7. #7
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    Thanks All. Land price is the difference. Lots here are 200-300 thousand.
    Just a little out of hand.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anacortes, Washington
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    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    I did a remodel of my own home with CPVC. Great stuff - easy to work with, forgiving if things don't exactly align, and difficult to get a bad joint. Most of my runs were in an attic with cellulose insulation and I didn't want to risk a fire sweating copper up there, so plastic became the material of choice. Didn't require any expensive tool like PEX does. At the time I was living in earthquake country and the added bonus was that CPVC was pretty resistant to movement.

    //Rick


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Flow guard CPVC

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    We just have more build able land here. A $260K house here will only use $20k to 30k for land cost. Also our labor is cheaper. So a new 260k house here is typically going to be a 2300 sq ft two story house, 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2-3 baths, and two car garage in a new neighborhood. I'll bet your land price is at least $120k for a starter home like you described.
    Double your guess.

    When we first moved to South Florida in 1987, the first house we had was an attached Townhouse (Patio Home really, it was one floor, but Townhouse is the better known term). We had an end unit which overlooked the wider lawn space between Phase I and Phase II where our girls and their friends used to play. Kind of like having a nice size side yard - it was probably about 50 feet wide.

    We paid $65k for that house. We sold it 7 years later for around $80k (prices had not gone up much at that time as there was still a lot of buildable land in South Florida). Our unit was the largest unit at 1,360 sf and had a 1 car garage. The land it was on was probably 35 feet wide (the width of the unit) by maybe 65 feet deep (guessing here).

    Now, however, there is little buildable land left down there.

    We had friends from South Florida up visiting just this past weekend (they used to own the unit next to us, they sold it and moved to a condo - yecch! - but they like the condo), they asked us what we thought those houses went for today.

    My guess was $150k, knowing that the market is down a bit.

    They said a friend of theirs just sold their unit (it was a smaller unit than we had and was not an end unit either) for $250k.

    Those are now considered 'starter homes'.

    Yes, the land cost is way up there.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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