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  1. #1
    Joshua Hardesty's Avatar
    Joshua Hardesty Guest

    Default Count the problems!

    We were called over to this house to fix the problems because the inspector failed the previous plumber. Wonder why! There was actually more wrong under the house but I haven't snapped any photos of that yet. They include using silicon to join pipe and fittings, an impressive custom-trap job, and pipe sloping the wrong direction. Done by a plumber with 40 years experience.

    For the ones not TOO obvious:

    0004, the 90 is a dry vent
    0007, that's an offset flange, because 12" would've meant he would cut a floor joist, which he had no problem doing elsewhere. Plus 10" would have worked fine.
    0011, that's a dry vent.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Joshua,

    Is 005 a large sweep sanitary tee installed for a horizontal change in direction, or is that a combination wye and 1/8 bend?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Looks like wye and 1/8th...



    RR


  4. #4
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Were you doing a construction inspection or a warranty inspection? If it was during construction then you should advise the client to call the AHJ as to why they passed the work.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    James,

    I think Joshua is a plumbing contractor, and he was hired to correct that mess, AFTER the AHJ did not approve it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Joshua Hardesty's Avatar
    Joshua Hardesty Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Jerry's correct.

    About a year ago, a man approached us on a jobsite saying he needed a plumber for a little remodel. We had to turn him down though, we were in the middle of a large commercial job (completely renovating an 80-year old apartment complex with 55 units) and weren't able to help him at the time. We met up with him again at the apartments recently and was told the plumbing failed, and he asked us over to explain some of the things marked off since he didn't know the lingo. The original plumber did this mess and charged the guy $5,000 for it, it comes out to about $1000 per fixture.

    Jerry, 0005 is a trap pushed up about as high as it will go to the bottom of the floor. Then there's a verticle offset, then a horizontal offset, before going into that combo. I can't remember, but I think the combo picks up a sink.


  7. #7
    Tim Moreira's Avatar
    Tim Moreira Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Jeff,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    What is a dry vent and why is a problem?
    A dry vent is a regular vent from a toilet or sink that goes up through the roof.

    A wet vent is according to the 03 IRC definitions:

    "WET VENT. A vent that also receives the discharge of wastes from other fixtures"


  8. #8
    Joshua Hardesty's Avatar
    Joshua Hardesty Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    What is a dry vent and why is a problem?
    It's a problem because the dry vent is being run horizontally. Dry vents shouldn't be run flat like that until they're 6" above the flood rim of the fixture they're venting.


  9. #9
    Richard Moore's Avatar
    Richard Moore Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    Mr Magoo Plumbing?

    Joshua,

    On 0007...I can see how an offset flange wouldn't be quite as efficient as a straight one. But, are they actually not allowed...or just a bad idea?


  10. #10
    Joshua Hardesty's Avatar
    Joshua Hardesty Guest

    Default Re: Count the problems!

    I *think* here in NC they're not allowed, but I don't have the codebook in front of me.


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